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Pro Team goes down in Plane crash..


BucsBoy02

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That's a tough one. I believe the leagues have backup plans in case of such an occurance. But plans and reality are always different things. Honestly, if a whole team went down, I'd think they'd have to take a few weeks off (depending on the sport), and they'd probably hastily re-write the schedule, with all teams and networks involved, not including that team. Then they'd probably (somehow) play out the schedule. The next season the team would return as an "expansion" team.

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Wow, if that were to happen I'm sure the league would stop for a while, but they probably have plans. Then it would probably be up to the owner what would happen. If they lost everyone it would probably be the owner's choice just to get rid of the team and probably the NFL would have an expansion team, or try to rebuild like an expansion team (similar to what Marshall did, except for the obvious differences in how players are taken).

That would be a tragic event, though, and it is very hard to think that something like that would happen.

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It's not mentioned much, and definitely not publicized, but all four major American sports leagues have a contingency plan in place for this type of thing.

In the one case where I've actually seen the contingency plan (it was several years ago and I can't remember which league to be sure, but something tells me it's the NFL), presuming it was during the course of the season the league would suspend play for one week. A special supplemental draft would then be staged, by telephone conference call, to restock the team's roster, with each of the other teams exposing 5 players to create the draft pool. The team would then resume play the week after the draft.

Of course I suspect if this nightmare of a scenario ever actually came to pass, any plans made in advance would go out the proverbial window. While you try to prepare for every situation you can think of, something terrible like this actually happening would result in adjustments 'on the fly,' and I can't see a scenario where a league, despite advance planning, wouldn't shutter the team for the remainder of that season, giving it time to mourn, then rebuild properly.

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just a question...and you dont have to answer if you dont want to, but what makes one think of these things? i know its reality and it could happen, but thats kinda random imo.

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In the case of hockey and baseball, teams would have enough players in their minor league systems to field a team the rest of the season... I would think the entire league would take a week off and then just bump the schedule back to accommodate (similar to what MLB did after 9/11)

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just a question...and you dont have to answer if you dont want to, but what makes one think of these things? i know its reality and it could happen, but thats kinda random imo.

Just something that I've always wondered. If it did happen, How would it play out or how do you all think it would be played out. Eh, I did watch we are Marshall the other day.

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just a question...and you dont have to answer if you dont want to, but what makes one think of these things? i know its reality and it could happen, but thats kinda random imo.

Just something that I've always wondered. If it did happen, How would it play out or how do you all think it would be played out. Eh, I did watch we are Marshall the other day.

ahh ok, i understand lol.

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It used to be my job to think of these things, but not from the league's point of view. I was director of emergency response for a major U.S. airline that operates worldwide and aside from scheduled flights, we flew numerous team charters. As far as the airline, those would be handled in the same way as a regularly scheduled flight - the airline would assign specially trained volunteer employees to assist people with logistical issues and to coordinate access to other resources such as counselors.

The job was rewarding in its own way...being able to help people (survivors and the families of non-survivors) in what was a very dark and difficult time, working with a very dedicated and capable team of people, and knowing you could cut it under the most trying circumstances.

The drawbacks included being on-call 24/7/365 with no exceptions ever, the anticipation of always knowing the pager would go off several times a year (usually just for events like severe turbulence or emergency landings), and having to constantly plan for the worst. For example, when the airline operated a trans-polar 777 proving flight to the Far East, rather than celebrating the positive aspects of flying passengers on such a route, our job was to figure out what to do if a plane full of passengers had to make an emergency landing or actually crashed in the Arctic.

One of the many things I learned was never to say "worst case scenario" because believe me, whatever humans can think of, there's always something out in left field waiting to blindside you (like 9/11 for example).

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In the case of hockey and baseball, teams would have enough players in their minor league systems to field a team the rest of the season... I would think the entire league would take a week off and then just bump the schedule back to accommodate (similar to what MLB did after 9/11)

I don't think it would be that easy for hockey or basketball, because most of the arenas that house NHL or NBA teams probably have other functions or other leagues scheduled during those days in the following weeks. In a case like that, what they would probably have to do is postpone all games of the following week and then pick up the schedule where it is supposed to and reschedule those postponed games for the end of the regular season.

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It used to be my job to think of these things, but not from the league's point of view. I was director of emergency response for a major U.S. airline that operates worldwide and aside from scheduled flights, we flew numerous team charters.

Seriously, how do you get a job like that? Is there a college major that leads to that field? I am asking because it sounds very interesting. What qualifications are required etc? I know it sounds warped but game planning that type of stuff is fascinating to me.

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It used to be my job to think of these things, but not from the league's point of view. I was director of emergency response for a major U.S. airline that operates worldwide and aside from scheduled flights, we flew numerous team charters.

Seriously, how do you get a job like that? Is there a college major that leads to that field? I am asking because it sounds very interesting. What qualifications are required etc? I know it sounds warped but game planning that type of stuff is fascinating to me.

I was thinking the same thing. That sounds like a very interesting albeit stressful job. How does one go about getting into that line of work?

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In the case of hockey and baseball, teams would have enough players in their minor league systems to field a team the rest of the season... I would think the entire league would take a week off and then just bump the schedule back to accommodate (similar to what MLB did after 9/11)

I don't think it would be that easy for hockey or basketball, because most of the arenas that house NHL or NBA teams probably have other functions or other leagues scheduled during those days in the following weeks. In a case like that, what they would probably have to do is postpone all games of the following week and then pick up the schedule where it is supposed to and reschedule those postponed games for the end of the regular season.

Or, try to fill in some dates within the season that both teams have off, like they do in baseball.

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In the one case where I've actually seen the contingency plan (it was several years ago and I can't remember which league to be sure, but something tells me it's the NFL), presuming it was during the course of the season the league would suspend play for one week. A special supplemental draft would then be staged, by telephone conference call, to restock the team's roster, with each of the other teams exposing 5 players to create the draft pool. The team would then resume play the week after the draft.

I'd heard some kind of similar plan once, but it was for major league baseball. I don't recalled that it called for postponing any games other than those of the team affected, but I can't see a league not deciding to call things off for a while because this would probably be quite overwhelming to all players and fans.

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Was it Man U or Liverpool that went down in the 60's?

That was Man U in 1958.

23 of 44 people died.

8 players died from injuried (7 immediately, 1 later) and 2 more players sustained injuried that prevented them from playing again.

Also, their Manager was in hospital for two months.

The team finished the season with Reserve and Youth players.

In February this year, when they play Man City, they will be wearing a replica 1958 kit, to commemorate 50 years since the tragedy.

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