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Colorado Rockies


Grish

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After getting the call from the local Little League and being assigned the Rockies as the team. I have come to the determination that the Rockies logos are limited and to me a little uninspired... Sorry the wordmark is difficult... what would be better, is there a solution considering the color choices they have made...

or is all just me, I just don't get the baseball feel from their uniform and logo sets.

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I'd like to help, but I have no idea what you're referring to.

i other words i wonder if there is a better logo and font choice that would make the Rockies look better.

Um ... yes?

Or maybe no.

I was in a similar boat nigh on 10 years ago, when I volunteered to coach a neighborhood little league team and was assigned the Devil Rays. As a youth baseball coach, you probably don't have any say in what your team looks like once the name has been chosen; it's not like your league is likely to give you the choice of which of the team's logos you can use on your team's caps and shirts. At least you get to rally your team around being named after the reigning NL champions and America's favorite team of last fall.

What you can do is suggest to the league that it consider expanding its offerings to include minor-league team identities in future. A number of minor-league teams have been offering youth team identity packages. I think the Biscuits, Dragons, Mud Hens, and Nuts have been leaders here. I've heard anecdotal reports that these youth team identities can make it easier to do sponsorship fundraising, too; your local barbecue joint will find a more natural pairing with the Biscuits than the Twins; your local comic shop my prefer to back the Dragons than the Yankees.

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I'd like to help, but I have no idea what you're referring to.

i other words i wonder if there is a better logo and font choice that would make the Rockies look better.

Um ... yes?

Or maybe no.

I was in a similar boat nigh on 10 years ago, when I volunteered to coach a neighborhood little league team and was assigned the Devil Rays. As a youth baseball coach, you probably don't have any say in what your team looks like once the name has been chosen; it's not like your league is likely to give you the choice of which of the team's logos you can use on your team's caps and shirts. At least you get to rally your team around being named after the reigning NL champions and America's favorite team of last fall.

What you can do is suggest to the league that it consider expanding its offerings to include minor-league team identities in future. A number of minor-league teams have been offering youth team identity packages. I think the Biscuits, Dragons, Mud Hens, and Nuts have been leaders here. I've heard anecdotal reports that these youth team identities can make it easier to do sponsorship fundraising, too; your local barbecue joint will find a more natural pairing with the Biscuits than the Twins; your local comic shop my prefer to back the Dragons than the Yankees.

This is my first venture into Little League -- maybe down the line when I am there for some time. It is just a little shocking, to get such a bland team with little mojo on their logos....

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This is my first venture into Little League -- maybe down the line when I am there for some time. It is just a little shocking, to get such a bland team with little mojo on their logos....

Well, remember that your kids won't care about the quality of the logos. They'll care about the colors and whether the shirts are uncomfortably hot in the summer sun. And for your players, "Rockies" should be a great team name. The winning streak, the come-back-from-the-dead-to-win-the-Pennant thing; there's a lot for a kid to be proud of wearing a Rockies uniform this year.

Just make sure you never say anything about not liking the team's logo to any member of the team. You've got to project committed pride in your team's uniform and make sure the kids take pride in their uniforms.

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"Just make sure you never say anything about not liking the team's logo to any member of the team. You've got to project committed pride in your team's uniform and make sure the kids take pride in their uniforms."

Great post. Taking pride in the game, the uniform and the privilege of playing on a team are more important than lots of coaches portray it. My team was the D-Rays last year, of all things, and we made it cool by outfitting every adult who helped in a green D-Rays hat, making the boys carry themselves the right way, and playing all-out hard-nosed ball. If the D-Rays can be cool, the Rockies can be even better, with their newfound history.

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What you can do is suggest to the league that it consider expanding its offerings to include minor-league team identities in future. A number of minor-league teams have been offering youth team identity packages. I think the Biscuits, Dragons, Mud Hens, and Nuts have been leaders here.

I'd think twice before setting a bunch of 10-year-old boys loose with Nuts as their nickname. :P

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"Just make sure you never say anything about not liking the team's logo to any member of the team. You've got to project committed pride in your team's uniform and make sure the kids take pride in their uniforms."

Great post. Taking pride in the game, the uniform and the privilege of playing on a team are more important than lots of coaches portray it. My team was the D-Rays last year, of all things, and we made it cool by outfitting every adult who helped in a green D-Rays hat, making the boys carry themselves the right way, and playing all-out hard-nosed ball. If the D-Rays can be cool, the Rockies can be even better, with their newfound history.

Hey -- I coached the Welles Park Devil Rays in 1999 and did about the same thing (though at the time it was purple, not green). My kids eked into the playoffs and lost a close game to miss the semifinals, and despite having a tough year in the win-loss sense, at the end of the game my kids were crying because they wanted to keep on playing. The other team's players were crying because their coach was laying into them for almost getting beaten by the freakin' D-Rays, whom the Tigers had beaten quite handily during the season. That one moment made the whole season worthwhile to me -- the league's quasi-official team for all the kids who get picked last in gym class showed real pride in themselves and love of the game. Dollars to donuts my team of second-grade Devil Rays played with more team pride than the actual 1999 Devil Rays.

Also, for kids under about fifth grade, it's often best not to tell them the exact score during the game. The kids who have their heads in the game will know anyway, and it's good to let the kids build some self-sufficiency. But mainly, kids wear their emotions so much on their sleeves that they can easily become disheartened after a single bad inning. I found it much better for the team, and for the whole teaching-situational-ball thing, to answer, "what's the score, coach?" with relative statements like, "we're keeping it close, so remember to keep that elbow up and make contact here" or "we're up by a few, so let's remember to get that glove down and stop the ball in the infield".

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"Just make sure you never say anything about not liking the team's logo to any member of the team. You've got to project committed pride in your team's uniform and make sure the kids take pride in their uniforms."

Great post. Taking pride in the game, the uniform and the privilege of playing on a team are more important than lots of coaches portray it. My team was the D-Rays last year, of all things, and we made it cool by outfitting every adult who helped in a green D-Rays hat, making the boys carry themselves the right way, and playing all-out hard-nosed ball. If the D-Rays can be cool, the Rockies can be even better, with their newfound history.

Hey -- I coached the Welles Park Devil Rays in 1999 and did about the same thing (though at the time it was purple, not green). My kids eked into the playoffs and lost a close game to miss the semifinals, and despite having a tough year in the win-loss sense, at the end of the game my kids were crying because they wanted to keep on playing. The other team's players were crying because their coach was laying into them for almost getting beaten by the freakin' D-Rays, whom the Tigers had beaten quite handily during the season. That one moment made the whole season worthwhile to me -- the league's quasi-official team for all the kids who get picked last in gym class showed real pride in themselves and love of the game. Dollars to donuts my team of second-grade Devil Rays played with more team pride than the actual 1999 Devil Rays.

Also, for kids under about fifth grade, it's often best not to tell them the exact score during the game. The kids who have their heads in the game will know anyway, and it's good to let the kids build some self-sufficiency. But mainly, kids wear their emotions so much on their sleeves that they can easily become disheartened after a single bad inning. I found it much better for the team, and for the whole teaching-situational-ball thing, to answer, "what's the score, coach?" with relative statements like, "we're keeping it close, so remember to keep that elbow up and make contact here" or "we're up by a few, so let's remember to get that glove down and stop the ball in the infield".

Trust me, I have done a ton of coaching... the post was more about never having noticed the Rockies lack of "Rock!" to their uniforms. I have done the purple and black before... I play up the fact that teams can tell us from a mile away because we are the only one's in purple, pride and etc... I am getting a local bid on shirts that read "Rockies Rock!" I teach this age too and everything must ROCK!

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What I'd do, if I had permission/capability, is to do a simple white jersey with black pinstripes, and the "R" from the "CR" wordmark on the left breast, similar to their (current?) secondaries.

But I really like the Rocky Balboa idea. A nice black n' gold combo with Stallone's face on the chest. You could even do a cross between the latest movie and the Bad News Bears by putting the "Adrian's Restaurant" logo above the number on the back, a la Chico's Bail Bonds. No one, kid or adult, would ever forget it, I guarantee it.

I actually sponsor a LL team in the town I grew up in back in Ohio. I did it on a lark really - LL gave me a lot, so I thought it'd be nice to give back. Team sponsorship for their "Major" league (where players stay on the same team for multiple years) is around $250 a year normally, I agreed to sponsor a team on one condition: that I picked the team's name and got to design and provide the uniforms each season. "McIntire's Mavericks" have played four years now, decked out in a different look every year, and while the team itself apparently stinks on the field (I've only seen the little sprites play one game, as I'm rarely up there), they seem to like what I come up with each season.

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I'd like to help, but I have no idea what you're referring to.

i other words i wonder if there is a better logo and font choice that would make the Rockies look better.

Um ... yes?

Or maybe no.

I was in a similar boat nigh on 10 years ago, when I volunteered to coach a neighborhood little league team and was assigned the Devil Rays. As a youth baseball coach, you probably don't have any say in what your team looks like once the name has been chosen; it's not like your league is likely to give you the choice of which of the team's logos you can use on your team's caps and shirts. At least you get to rally your team around being named after the reigning NL champions and America's favorite team of last fall.

What you can do is suggest to the league that it consider expanding its offerings to include minor-league team identities in future. A number of minor-league teams have been offering youth team identity packages. I think the Biscuits, Dragons, Mud Hens, and Nuts have been leaders here. I've heard anecdotal reports that these youth team identities can make it easier to do sponsorship fundraising, too; your local barbecue joint will find a more natural pairing with the Biscuits than the Twins; your local comic shop my prefer to back the Dragons than the Yankees.

This is my first venture into Little League -- maybe down the line when I am there for some time. It is just a little shocking, to get such a bland team with little mojo on their logos....

Okay I realize it's your team, so you can do whatever. But never being in Little League, do they hand you the uniforms etc, or can you order your own? From what I understand is that you're coming to this team late notice, and you want more of you in the look? What about next year doing script for the name or changing the font used. I do know from coaching and playing in a rec league that we had the rec league logo on the front and we had to put the player number on the left arm and the back. We could pick the name and the colors and hats were our choice. I wish I could've worn a major league type uniform that had the name across the front. As a kid that would've been so cool. Trying to look hip and hot wasn't a thought, though looking like a major leaguer was a cool thing. I just wonder if the question would've been asked if you would've been given a team such as the Yankees, Dodgers, Tigers, Cubs, or Giants which all I guess have no "mojo" (whatever the hell that is) logos. Maybe having these really cool logos is what really means something to kids these days, but I know growing up to wear what the Major Leaguers were wearing was what was really cool.

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Simply put, just bite your tongue about being the Rockies and go with the assigned uniforms. At that age, the kids are just excited to have a uniform, or would rather be at soccer practice.

My brother coached both his sons in Little League. The 9 and 10s had minor league uniforms, and the kids had no clue what the teams were. And when they got to be in the Majors, they all knew they couldn't be the Yankees.

They deal, they're kids. We bite our tongues because we throw up at the site of certain uninspired logos :)

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