Jump to content

mapleleafs.com webmasters


MVP

Recommended Posts

The other guys hardly paid attention to the details when I was there, things like this happened all the time.

Then again us logo and uniform folk are an odd bunch when it comes to details.

Details? That is an obvious photoshop job of a Bruins jersey. You think if they were going to use phtoshop they would do a better job.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
Well, the hockey team was named after a successful local baseball team, but I don't know where the baseball team got its name.

The argument I heard around here recently by someone (sorry if I forget who -- might have been you) was that they are named after THE maple leaf, not multiple maple leaves.

If that is the case then I guess you could compare it to the Minnesota Wild (named after THE wild, not multiple wilds) the only difference being that the Maple Leafs added the "s" to the end probably because crazy singular names were not even conceivable back then.

An alternate way of looking at it would be maybe "Leafs" was an acceptable plural of leaf back in the 1920's - much like sox (red sox, white sox) was an acceptable plural of sock back in the early 1900's.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The argument I heard around here recently by someone (sorry if I forget who -- might have been you) was that they are named after THE maple leaf, not multiple maple leaves.

Which maple leaf? I haven't seen any references to the baseball team using a singular name (although it was a long time ago).

An alternate way of looking at it would be maybe "Leafs" was an acceptable plural of leaf back in the 1920's - much like sox (red sox, white sox) was an acceptable plural of sock back in the early 1900's.

"Sox" wasn't really an acceptable plural of sock in general parlance, but rather a snappy newspaper headline contraction.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The argument I heard around here recently by someone (sorry if I forget who -- might have been you) was that they are named after THE maple leaf, not multiple maple leaves.

Which maple leaf? I haven't seen any references to the baseball team using a singular name (although it was a long time ago).

I would say the Canadian symbol (a maple leaf :P) - although the giant leaf didn't appear on the flag until the '60s, there's a reason every flag proposal bounced about included one - it was a national symbol prior to the flag.

An alternate way of looking at it would be maybe "Leafs" was an acceptable plural of leaf back in the 1920's - much like sox (red sox, white sox) was an acceptable plural of sock back in the early 1900's.

"Sox" wasn't really an acceptable plural of sock in general parlance, but rather a snappy newspaper headline contraction.

If my classes in English-language history taught me anything it would be that in the early 20th Century in the United States some English words were modified to remove what they deemed to be "unnecessary characters"... some stuck (see "color"), others didn't (see "sox")

Found one reference to this whole dealy here

http://www.twainquotes.com/19060312.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I knew about the movement (isn't that the same one which gave us "Pittsburg?" Or am I conflating two distinct attempts to rewrite American English?). That's the first time I've heard that "Sox" was a part of it.

I would say the Canadian symbol (a maple leaf :P) - although the giant leaf didn't appear on the flag until the '60s, there's a reason every flag proposal bounced about included one - it was a national symbol prior to the flag.

True, but weren't they usually displayed in sets of three?

canadacoatofarms.gif

Kinda works against the single-noun theory.... :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From mapleleafs.com

In February of 1927, Conn Smythe, who had built the New York Rangers franchise but was dismissed in favour of Lester Patrick, raised enough money to buy the St. Pats and prevented the team from moving to Philadelphia. Smythe, a military man, immediately had the Toronto franchise name changed from the St. Pats to Maple Leafs, the name of a World War I fighting unit, the Maple Leaf Regiment. He also switched the uniform colours to blue and white from green and white.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I knew about the movement (isn't that the same one which gave us "Pittsburg?" Or am I conflating two distinct attempts to rewrite American English?). That's the first time I've heard that "Sox" was a part of it.

I've heard that theory before, and I don't buy it. For one thing, these attempts to simplify English spelling to back to Noah Webster's codification of American English in the late 1700s, and Webster's reforms were generally much more successful than any subsequent effort. (Americans don't spell "honor" or "color" with a U, for example, thanks to Webster's work around 1800, long before the early 20th century. He also gave us "theater" and "center", "plow" and "jail".)

For another, I know a thing or two about newspapering, and even had there never been a movement to simplify spelling, it would be "Sox" in headlines. Especially in the years between the Civil War and 1960. It wasn't out of devotion to spelling reform, after all, that Variety ran the most famous headline in American history in 1935: "Sticks Nix Hick Pix". Impact and brevity often trump spelling and strict grammar in headlines.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For another, I know a thing or two about newspapering, and even had there never been a movement to simplify spelling, it would be "Sox" in headlines. Especially in the years between the Civil War and 1960. It wasn't out of devotion to spelling reform, after all, that Variety ran the most famous headline in American history in 1935: "Sticks Nix Hick Pix". Impact and brevity often trump spelling and strict grammar in headlines.

That's my sense as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From mapleleafs.com
In February of 1927, Conn Smythe, who had built the New York Rangers franchise but was dismissed in favour of Lester Patrick, raised enough money to buy the St. Pats and prevented the team from moving to Philadelphia. Smythe, a military man, immediately had the Toronto franchise name changed from the St. Pats to Maple Leafs, the name of a World War I fighting unit, the Maple Leaf Regiment. He also switched the uniform colours to blue and white from green and white.

Move them to Philadelphia? Thank God we didnt get stuck with that joke.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From mapleleafs.com
In February of 1927, Conn Smythe, who had built the New York Rangers franchise but was dismissed in favour of Lester Patrick, raised enough money to buy the St. Pats and prevented the team from moving to Philadelphia. Smythe, a military man, immediately had the Toronto franchise name changed from the St. Pats to Maple Leafs, the name of a World War I fighting unit, the Maple Leaf Regiment. He also switched the uniform colours to blue and white from green and white.

Move them to Philadelphia? Thank God we didnt get stuck with that joke.

Wachovia can't handle the weight of 13 cup banners?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.