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Pantone colors and Media Guides


swisherHOU

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I was flipping through the Houston Texans 2007 Media Guide and they list their color names but also gave the Pantone numbers right next to them (Deep Steel Blue (Pantone 5395C)

Battle Red (Pantone 187C). I know the Pantone numbers are usually guarded so is this pretty rare or do other teams list them as well?

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I'm going to take a wild guess and say that if it's a media guide then it's for the use of the media to use the correct colors in print and in digital graphics, and that it's not so guarded but put in there under the understanding that it is to be only used for those purposes and not for us uniform geeks.

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I know the Pantone numbers are usually guarded so is this pretty rare or do other teams list them as well?

If you know where to look you can find the Tampa Bay Buccaneers' Pantone solid color codes (and one textile code) on their website.

Are they still accurate? I have no idea.

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I know the Pantone numbers are usually guarded so is this pretty rare or do other teams list them as well?

If you know where to look you can find the Tampa Bay Buccaneers' Pantone solid color codes (and one textile code) on their website.

Are they still accurate? I have no idea.

Checking...I'll let ya know.

B)

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Question... Why are PANTONE colors any better that Hex colors? That's what I use...

The Color Authority of the CCSLC (a.k.a. PANTONE) could tell you all the ins and outs of this much better than any of us could, but I'll tell you in a nutshell what I know of it: HEX colors (or hexacolors) are used for the web, whereas PMS colors (Pantone Matching System) are more often used for print purposes (and, as most of us know thanks to PANTONE's expertise, textile/fabric as well). You can use PMS colors on the web, but it won't look the same on screen as it will on the color chips themselves, and this is why: screen colors (HEX, in this instance) are RGB, or light-based, which makes colors appear brighter than they really are otherwise on some monitors, whereas print colors are ink-based, either in CMYK (the standard 4-color system for print--those colors being Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and blacK, or spot colors, which PANTONE colors are (and they themselves are mixtures of different ink colors, just in a specific set formula).

Kinda help you out a little bit?

PMS (Pantone) colors are specific, whereas HEX colors are "in the ballpark", if that makes any sense. That's why so many of us tear through and pore over so many things either via Google or through someone's media guide in order to get the true color of a certain team or so.

(Corollary: That's also why damn near all of us up in here are so daggone jealous of PANTONE's knowledge and expertise of, as well as connections with, this stuff. :P )

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Question... Why are PANTONE colors any better that Hex colors? That's what I use...

The Color Authority of the CCSLC (a.k.a. PANTONE) could tell you all the ins and outs of this much better than any of us could, but I'll tell you in a nutshell what I know of it: HEX colors (or hexacolors) are used for the web, whereas PMS colors (Pantone Matching System) are more often used for print purposes (and, as most of us know thanks to PANTONE's expertise, textile/fabric as well). You can use PMS colors on the web, but it won't look the same on screen as it will on the color chips themselves, and this is why: screen colors (HEX, in this instance) are RGB, or light-based, which makes colors appear brighter than they really are otherwise on some monitors, whereas print colors are ink-based, either in CMYK (the standard 4-color system for print--those colors being Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and blacK, or spot colors, which PANTONE colors are (and they themselves are mixtures of different ink colors, just in a specific set formula).

Kinda help you out a little bit?

PMS (Pantone) colors are specific, whereas HEX colors are "in the ballpark", if that makes any sense. That's why so many of us tear through and pore over so many things either via Google or through someone's media guide in order to get the true color of a certain team or so.

(Corollary: That's also why damn near all of us up in here are so daggone jealous of PANTONE's knowledge and expertise of, as well as connections with, this stuff. :P )

Thanks Bucco, that makes more sense now(though it probably won't ever make complete sense to me, lol)

Thanks again.

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The Color Authority of the CCSLC (a.k.a. PANTONE) could tell you all the ins and outs of this much better than any of us could, but I'll tell you in a nutshell what I know of it: HEX colors (or hexacolors) are used for the web, whereas PMS colors (Pantone Matching System) are more often used for print purposes (and, as most of us know thanks to PANTONE's expertise, textile/fabric as well). You can use PMS colors on the web, but it won't look the same on screen as it will on the color chips themselves, and this is why: screen colors (HEX, in this instance) are RGB, or light-based, which makes colors appear brighter than they really are otherwise on some monitors, whereas print colors are ink-based, either in CMYK (the standard 4-color system for print--those colors being Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and blacK, or spot colors, which PANTONE colors are (and they themselves are mixtures of different ink colors, just in a specific set formula).

Kinda help you out a little bit?

PMS (Pantone) colors are specific, whereas HEX colors are "in the ballpark", if that makes any sense. That's why so many of us tear through and pore over so many things either via Google or through someone's media guide in order to get the true color of a certain team or so.

Very well put. What I'd also like to throw out there is that the RGB/Hex values I use are specifically measured by the people at Pantone, Inc. to most accurately represent their colors on computer monitors. These RGB values will (almost always) look more accurate than simply taking an Illustrator Pantone swatch file and using that color. Adobe's getting better at it, but most of the time, Pantone's colors (either using the sRGB255 or Adobe (1998) color space) will look remarkably closer to the actual color intended. Closer than CMYK. And if you don't believe me, go pick up a copy of the PANTONE Color Bridge...makes you realize how crappy printing in CMYK can be.

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Back to the original question...

I've got Mets media guides dating back to 1997 and by the end of the season, they're all full of notes and other marks (meaning I really USE them for reference and whatnot--they're not just to have them if ya know what I mean), and they've never made any mention to my knowledge...

So it's probably a team-by-team basis...

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Yeah, it's definitely on a team-by-team basis. Back when I started collecting this information, some teams were more than happy to provide the information, while others acted as if I was asking for confidential goverment files. So, I've always just taken the high road in this regard; since not everyone would be happy with them being in the open, I just protect them all.

Since the USFL and XFL are no longer in operation, I have made exceptions for them on the SSUR. Someday, if the teams and leagues decide that divulging this information is OK, then I'll stop being such a hard-a$$ about it. I hope so...it would make the discussions about them a lot easier!

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