Sign in to follow this  
randyc

Pitcher dealt for 10 bats

Recommended Posts

Uggh. Didn't the GBL trade a player for a case of beer a few years ago?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the other team is willing to give him up for 10 bats or a case of beer, is he worth having?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was hoping this was a thread about Aaron Heilman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Me and my dad always joked about trading guys for a bag of pucks and some gas for the zamboni, but I didn't think I'd ever hear a story like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Weren't Harry Chiti and Dickie Noles both traded for themselves back in the day?

According to Wikipedia:

On April 25, 1962, Chiti was purchased by the expansion New York Mets from the Cleveland Indians for a player to be named later. That "player to be named later" ended up being Harry Chiti, arranged to be sent back to the Indians on June 15, 1962.

In 1987, Noles became the second player, after Harry Chiti, in Major League Baseball history to be traded for himself. Noles was traded from the Cubs to the Detroit Tigers for a player to be named later. Several months later, the teams were unable to agree on what player Chicago would receive, and so Noles was shipped back to the Cubs, completing a deal in which he was traded for himself.

Other weird trades:

Kerry Ligtenberg was once traded for 72 baseballs and six bats.

As part of the shift of "Monday Night Football" from ABC to ESPN, broadcaster Al Michaels was allowed to jump to NBC in exchange for, among other things, the rights to a cartoon bunny named Oswald the Lucky Rabbit. Walt Disney, owners of ABC and ESPN, had created the Oswald cartoon in the 1920s, but NBC owned the rights to the character.

Schaumburg Assigned the contract of RHP Nigel Thatch (Rookie) to Fullerton of the Golden Baseball League in exchange for 1 pallet (60 cases) of Budweiser beer.

On March 5, 1973, at the New York Yankees' spring training camp in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., pitchers Mike Kekich and Fritz Peterson announced they had swapped wives, two children apiece and even family dogs.

Apparently in Romania it's pretty common for soccer players to be traded for meat, milk, tires, beer, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I once met Dickie Noles and asked what was it like to be traded for yourself and he just looked at me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.seattlehockey.net/breakers/breakers.htm

In January of 1983 the Breakers made what is undoubtedly the strangest trade in the history of hockey. Seattle owned the rights to forward Tom Martin, who was playing with the University of Denver. They traded his rights to the Victoria Cougars "for a used bus and future considerations" (quote from Total Hockey, 2nd ed.). When asked about the trade years later, Breakers owner John Hamilton stated "It may have been the best deal I ever made." What did Martin have to say about the deal? "I heard the bus was a really nice one."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How do you deal with something like this as a player? Honestly if I was ever traded for something stupid like that I don't think I would be able to play the sport anymore. Talk about being slandered by your team.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not really. Your services are being traded, as a commodity, same as you would trade anything else. I personally think I'd enjoy the novelty of it myself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How do you deal with something like this as a player? Honestly if I was ever traded for something stupid like that I don't think I would be able to play the sport anymore. Talk about being slandered by your team.

I would be a little embarassed, mostly because it would give my friends some fodder for the old ribbing cannon, but considering the circumstances around him not being able to play in Canada (it's not like he just sucked and they wanted him gone), it's not that big a deal. I'd actually try and use it as an ironic badge of honor like he said: "It'll make a good story if I make it to the Majors." I hope he does.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the more unusual trades in Major League Baseball occurred on the 30th of May 1922, when the St Louis Cardinals were playing a doubleheader against the Chicago Cubs. After the first game, the Cardinals Cliff Heathcote was traded for the Cubs Max Flack. Both players played for their new teams in the second game of the doubleheader.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stop bumping old threads [mod redacted]

Watch the unnecessary personal attacks.

-Lee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this