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Forgive me for not knowing this but why is Selig based out of Milwaukee and Miller Park?

EDIT: Just found the answer to my question. He's part owner of the Milwaukee Brewers. However, I would think that would sort of interfere with his duties as commissioner since he's drawn more to one specific team.

Guessing this has already been answered but I haven't scrolled down yet: Bud Selig was the guy who bought the Seattle Pilots and turned them into the Milwaukee Brewers. When he became the commissioner, he turned day-to-day ops over to his daughter, which is about when the Brewers became a national laughingstock. Then he sold them to Mark Attanasio and they got good again.

Yeah, the question was answered but maybe you can answer a new one for me. Were the Seattle Pilots struggling to connect with their fans, or maybe financially when Bud bought and moved them?

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Forgive me for not knowing this but why is Selig based out of Milwaukee and Miller Park?

EDIT: Just found the answer to my question. He's part owner of the Milwaukee Brewers. However, I would think that would sort of interfere with his duties as commissioner since he's drawn more to one specific team.

Guessing this has already been answered but I haven't scrolled down yet: Bud Selig was the guy who bought the Seattle Pilots and turned them into the Milwaukee Brewers. When he became the commissioner, he turned day-to-day ops over to his daughter, which is about when the Brewers became a national laughingstock. Then he sold them to Mark Attanasio and they got good again.

Yeah, the question was answered but maybe you can answer a new one for me. Were the Seattle Pilots struggling to connect with their fans, or maybe financially when Bud bought and moved them?

From what I remember, poor facility (minor league park) and financial. Selig was/is a big time car dealer.

TF2.png

2012

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What does a Jellyfish have to do with Target Field?

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Forgive me for not knowing this but why is Selig based out of Milwaukee and Miller Park?

EDIT: Just found the answer to my question. He's part owner of the Milwaukee Brewers. However, I would think that would sort of interfere with his duties as commissioner since he's drawn more to one specific team.

Guessing this has already been answered but I haven't scrolled down yet: Bud Selig was the guy who bought the Seattle Pilots and turned them into the Milwaukee Brewers. When he became the commissioner, he turned day-to-day ops over to his daughter, which is about when the Brewers became a national laughingstock. Then he sold them to Mark Attanasio and they got good again.

Which ought to dispel any silly rumors that Bud was in any way pulling strings behind the scenes - when he ran the club, the Brewers were one of the best-run franchises in all of baseball. They fell apart almost instantly once he became Commissioner.

Can't wait to see the rest of those Twins logos. And the "shaking hands" sign, if it really does move, might be my most favorite ballpark feature ever.

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What does a Jellyfish have to do with Target Field?

I believe that's supposed to be a mushroom cloud, not a jellyfish.

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x1110g.jpg

I also added this in the MLB speculation topic of the complete new Twins logo.

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x1110g.jpg

I also added this in the MLB speculation topic of the complete new Twins logo.

I like it!

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Not to continue the threadjack but...

Seattle in the 60s was growing quickly with Boeing a huge economic engine as the jet age kicked in. The World's Fair brought it to national attention in 61, and baseball started looking at it for expansion - a natural with a major city, no competiton for hundreds of miles (nearest teams were San Fran, LA and Kansas City). But the ownership group was underfunded, and the fixup of old Sicks Stadium, a Triple AAA park, was delayed to the point where not all the seats were ready for opening day. The plumbing didn't work well, the facilities were substandard and the tickets were too expensive($6 top, very high for 69; when the Brewers started play next year, covered mezzanine seats at County Stadium went for $5.) They also went with over the hill "names" instead of building young; Lou Pinella was traded away to Kansas City where he beame Rookie of the Year. In short, a mess, and the owners went bankrupt. With the dome still years away, no local owners were interested, and Selig, who had been looking for a team since the Braves left, was ready.

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Not to continue the threadjack but...

Seattle in the 60s was growing quickly with Boeing a huge economic engine as the jet age kicked in. The World's Fair brought it to national attention in 61, and baseball started looking at it for expansion - a natural with a major city, no competiton for hundreds of miles (nearest teams were San Fran, LA and Kansas City). But the ownership group was underfunded, and the fixup of old Sicks Stadium, a Triple AAA park, was delayed to the point where not all the seats were ready for opening day. The plumbing didn't work well, the facilities were substandard and the tickets were too expensive($6 top, very high for 69; when the Brewers started play next year, covered mezzanine seats at County Stadium went for $5.) They also went with over the hill "names" instead of building young; Lou Pinella was traded away to Kansas City where he beame Rookie of the Year. In short, a mess, and the owners went bankrupt. With the dome still years away, no local owners were interested, and Selig, who had been looking for a team since the Braves left, was ready.

That?s cool, I really had no idea. Thanks for the history lesson on that.

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And just to clarify one other point, Selig has never been based out of Miller Park. He has two offices - one on Park Avenue in Manhattan, and one in the old First Wisconsin building in Milwaukee.

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Have you or do you know anyone who has ever run into Bud Selig at a Kopp's stand? I heard he's a pretty affable guy.

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You won't find Bud at a Kopps stand - he's strictly a Gilles man. :D

I ran into Bud at a Brewers' game. He was sitting in a suite that runs along the back of the lower level. Would have been easy for him to stay out of sight in the glassed-in area, but he was out there in the seats along the aisle, chatting with anyone who wanted, signing autographs. Seemed like a nice person.

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It?s kind of funny, if you didn?t know much about Bud Selig before the whole Canseco Steroid Book came out, your perception of him is probably not a very good one, but it sounds like he?s a nice guy who happens to have his crap together.

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It?s kind of funny, if you didn?t know much about Bud Selig before the whole Canseco Steroid Book came out, your perception of him is probably not a very good one, but it sounds like he?s a nice guy who happens to have his crap together.

I don't think the public perception is that he's a "bad guy" per say, just someone who turned a blind eye to a very obvious issue going on in his sport. Maybe I'm wrong, but it seems like everything I read about him in the columns and internet says otherwise. He's actually one of the major reasons why the game is where it is today. His work has taken MLB to new heights. The majority of clubs built or renovated new stadiums within the last 15 years, attendance and revenues continue to skyrocket, new lucrative TV contracts were signed, baseball expanded into new areas of the country, they came back full circle from a strike that nearly killed half the teams in baseball, etc.

Of course, with the good comes the bad. In order to keep the game marketable and do all of the above he had to turn a blind eye to what his players were doing regarding drugs. Homeruns and larger then life superstars put people in the seats, sells jerseys, and makes people turn on their TV to watch. I'm not sure if I would have done anything any different if I was in his shoes. He's had a real tough job to do and I think he's done it quite well. Too bad he won't be known for the good stuff he's done. His legacy will always be tainted with the whole steroid thing.

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I don't know if I'd actually put all the blame on Bud. The union dragged its feet for a very long time on the issue, and the player's union is stronger in baseball than in most other sports.

But yes. Good with the bad. For every Wild Card, you have Interleague Play.

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I don't know if I'd actually put all the blame on Bud. The union dragged its feet for a very long time on the issue, and the player's union is stronger in baseball than in most other sports.

But yes. Good with the bad. For every Wild Card, you have Interleague Play.

Oh I'm almost positive the Player's Union totally knew about it...how could they not? I agree, Bud shouldn't have all the blame put on him, but I think in 10-15 years when we look back on the "steroid era" he will. Thats the sad truth to this whole thing. And yes, interleague play definitely was and still is a bad idea. :)

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It?s kind of funny, if you didn?t know much about Bud Selig before the whole Canseco Steroid Book came out, your perception of him is probably not a very good one, but it sounds like he?s a nice guy who happens to have his crap together.

I don't think the public perception is that he's a "bad guy" per say, just someone who turned a blind eye to a very obvious issue going on in his sport. Maybe I'm wrong, but it seems like everything I read about him in the columns and internet says otherwise. He's actually one of the major reasons why the game is where it is today. His work has taken MLB to new heights. The majority of clubs built or renovated new stadiums within the last 15 years, attendance and revenues continue to skyrocket, new lucrative TV contracts were signed, baseball expanded into new areas of the country, they came back full circle from a strike that nearly killed half the teams in baseball, etc.

Of course, with the good comes the bad. In order to keep the game marketable and do all of the above he had to turn a blind eye to what his players were doing regarding drugs. Homeruns and larger then life superstars put people in the seats, sells jerseys, and makes people turn on their TV to watch. I'm not sure if I would have done anything any different if I was in his shoes. He's had a real tough job to do and I think he's done it quite well. Too bad he won't be known for the good stuff he's done. His legacy will always be tainted with the whole steroid thing.

So should we all look at Barry Bonds with such judgmental eyes?

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