Jump to content

Possible leak of MLB 2003 Steroid List


Bleujayone

Recommended Posts

As posted on CBS Sports.com

I'll let everyone here decide if this is real or bunk....

http://www.cbssports.com/mcc/messages/chrono/15811074

"I hate rumor-mongering and I hate the argument over steroids, but this is too ?juicy? to pass up.

rotoinfo.com has posted the list of 103 names on the mythical 2003 steroid list.

I don't believe this to be true at all. Simply take a look at the names and feel free to discuss it in the comments. If you take it any further, please excuse yourself from the Internet.

This could all be a crock of nothing, and that?s the way I?m leaning right now."

1.Nomar Garciaparra

2.Manny Ramirez

3.Johnny Damon

4.Trot Nixon

5.David Ortiz

6.Shea Hillenbrand

7.Derek Lowe

8.Pedro Martinez

9.Brian Roberts

10.Jay Gibbons

11.Melvin Mora

12.Jerry Hairston

13.Jason Giambi

14.Alfonso Soriano

15.Raul Mondesi

16. Aaron Boone

17.Andy Pettitte

18.Jose Contreras

19.Roger Clemens

20.Carlos Delgado

21.Vernon Wells

22.Frank Catalanotto

23.Kenny Rogers

24.Magglio Ordonez

25.Sandy Alomar

26.Bartolo Colon

27.Brent Abernathy

28.Jose Lima

29.Milton Bradley

30.Casey Blake

31.Danys Baez

32.Craig Monroe

33.Dmitri Young

34.Alex Sanchez

35.Eric Chavez

36.Miguel Tejada

37.Eric Byrnes

38.Jose Guillen

39.Keith Foulke

40.Ricardo Rincon

41.Bret Boone

42.Mike Cameron

43.Randy Winn

44.Ryan Franklin

45.Freddy Garcia

46.Rafael Soriano

47.Scott Spiezio

48.Troy Glaus

49.Francisco Rodriguez

50.Ben Weber

51.Alex Rodriguez

52.Juan Gonzalez

53.Rafael Palmeiro

54.Carl Everett

55.Javy Lopez

56.Gary Sheffield

57.Mike Hampton

58.Ivan Rodriguez

59.Derrek Lee

60.Bobby Abreu

61.Terry Adams

62.Fernando Tatis

63.Livan Hernandez

64.Hector Almonte

65.Tony Armas

66.Dan Smith

67.Roberto Alomar

68.Cliff Floyd

69.Roger Cedeno

70.Jeromy Burnitz

71.Moises Alou

72.Sammy Sosa

73.Corey Patterson

74.Carlos Zambrano

75.Mark Prior

76.Kerry Wood

77.Matt Clement

78.Antonio Alfonseca

79.Juan Cruz

80.Aramis Ramirez

81.Craig Wilson

82.Kris Benson

83.Richie Sexson

84.Geoff Jenkins

85.Valerio de los Santos

86.Benito Santiago

87.Rich Aurilia

88.Barry Bonds

89.Andres Galarraga

90.Jason Schmidt

91.Felix Rodriguez

92.Jason Christiansen

93.Matt Herges

94.Paul Lo Duca

95.Shawn Green

96.Oliver Perez

97.Adrian Beltre

98.Eric Gagne

99.Guillermo Mota

100.Luis Gonzalez

101.Todd Helton

102.Ryan Klesko

103.Gary Matthews

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It looks like a fair amount of guys that are on the Mitchell Report are on here. Then again, the list would have no credibility whatsoever if someone on the Mitchell Report wasn't on the list, so take that with a grain of salt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You guys didn't see this earlier? It's been out for 4 or 5 days now. I'm almost positive that it's bull :censored:, given the lack of fringe-type players, the large number of seemingly handpicked big names, and the fact that when this list was first released on Rotoinfo (which I've never heard of and gave no sources whatsoever), Jeromy Burnitz was on the list twice, #70 and #96.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank god Ken Griffey Jr. has not been on any of these lists. If it ever comes out that he took steroids, I'm going to quit baseball and stop watching forever. I will completely disassociate myself with the game of baseball.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This could be the list and if it is the biggest shock I will say is Pedro Martinez, this guy weighs 150lbs. I would never though he was a juicer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You guys didn't see this earlier? It's been out for 4 or 5 days now. I'm almost positive that it's bull :censored:, given the lack of fringe-type players, the large number of seemingly handpicked big names, and the fact that when this list was first released on Rotoinfo (which I've never heard of and gave no sources whatsoever), Jeromy Burnitz was on the list twice, #70 and #96.

You are correct as this was on Deadspin earlier this week then was taken down. Jason Grimsley admitted he failed a test in 2003, but is not listed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It looks like they just compiled a list of all the players who were caught or admitted to it and added in a bunch of players who have started to struggle in the past couple of seasons.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jeromy Burnitz was on the list twice, #70 and #96.

Not on this list. #96 is listed as Oliver Perez.

Maybe you're right and the list is nonsense. I would say again that MLB should just bite the bullet, release the damn list and get it over with. It'll either confirm the above list or prove it to be otherwise. In any event, it would bring this whole affair into the light. Then and only then would the sport have any real possibility of being able to deal with the issue and move on. Otherwise, it will always be the festering pile of dog crap in the middle of the room that no one wants to address. Eventually somebody has got to pick up this mess.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank god Ken Griffey Jr. has not been on any of these lists. If it ever comes out that he took steroids, I'm going to quit baseball and stop watching forever. I will completely disassociate myself with the game of baseball.

Seconded. When Junior was still here in Cincinnati, everytime something about steroids came out, the Cincinnati Enquirer would have an article about how Griffey was never mentioned in any of it.

Also, I would hate it if Jerry Hairston really took steroids.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jeromy Burnitz was on the list twice, #70 and #96.

Not on this list. #96 is listed as Oliver Perez.

Maybe you're right and the list is nonsense. I would say again that MLB should just bite the bullet, release the damn list and get it over with. It'll either confirm the above list or prove it to be otherwise. In any event, it would bring this whole affair into the light. Then and only then would the sport have any real possibility of being able to deal with the issue and move on. Otherwise, it will always be the festering pile of dog crap in the middle of the room that no one wants to address. Eventually somebody has got to pick up this mess.

Heres how you clean it up

MLB announces that the HOF should not account for steroids, and that anyone who used steroids before 2005, when they began suspending players should be granted amnesty, and thus the matter is close. MLB should make at the same time one cleansing statement admitting that as a league, it looked the other way, and did not take the issue seriously, and acknowledge allot of players took steroids, and the fact the league did not take the issue seriously probably caused this. Also mention there were several players who were in it just to cheat the system, but with so many players using steroids it would be unfair to determine who those players were, as opposed to the players who ended up using steroids to keep up with other abusers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

None of those names seriously shock me, but if Andres Galarraga was a steroid user I'll be greatly disappointed.

I'll say this is fake, ESPN would be all over this if it were true.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jeromy Burnitz was on the list twice, #70 and #96.

Not on this list. #96 is listed as Oliver Perez.

Maybe you're right and the list is nonsense. I would say again that MLB should just bite the bullet, release the damn list and get it over with. It'll either confirm the above list or prove it to be otherwise. In any event, it would bring this whole affair into the light. Then and only then would the sport have any real possibility of being able to deal with the issue and move on. Otherwise, it will always be the festering pile of dog crap in the middle of the room that no one wants to address. Eventually somebody has got to pick up this mess.

MLB won't release that list unless they really, really want to piss off the Players' Union. The only reason the union allowed this drug testing was that MLB promised confidentiality with the results. The legal issues that could come from this would be astounding.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jeromy Burnitz was on the list twice, #70 and #96.

Not on this list. #96 is listed as Oliver Perez.

Maybe you're right and the list is nonsense. I would say again that MLB should just bite the bullet, release the damn list and get it over with. It'll either confirm the above list or prove it to be otherwise. In any event, it would bring this whole affair into the light. Then and only then would the sport have any real possibility of being able to deal with the issue and move on. Otherwise, it will always be the festering pile of dog crap in the middle of the room that no one wants to address. Eventually somebody has got to pick up this mess.

Was

When it was first released, there were 104 names and two of them were Jeromy Burnitz. It was soon edited.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jeromy Burnitz was on the list twice, #70 and #96.

Not on this list. #96 is listed as Oliver Perez.

Maybe you're right and the list is nonsense. I would say again that MLB should just bite the bullet, release the damn list and get it over with. It'll either confirm the above list or prove it to be otherwise. In any event, it would bring this whole affair into the light. Then and only then would the sport have any real possibility of being able to deal with the issue and move on. Otherwise, it will always be the festering pile of dog crap in the middle of the room that no one wants to address. Eventually somebody has got to pick up this mess.

Heres how you clean it up

MLB announces that the HOF should not account for steroids, and that anyone who used steroids before 2005, when they began suspending players should be granted amnesty, and thus the matter is close. MLB should make at the same time one cleansing statement admitting that as a league, it looked the other way, and did not take the issue seriously, and acknowledge allot of players took steroids, and the fact the league did not take the issue seriously probably caused this. Also mention there were several players who were in it just to cheat the system, but with so many players using steroids it would be unfair to determine who those players were, as opposed to the players who ended up using steroids to keep up with other abusers.

You cannot release names, period. The document was sealed, however there have been people who apparently want to "snitch". I would think that someone like you Tank would appreciate the justice system and the sealing of documents because of your career and political leanings. If both parties agree to sealed documents, then so be it. Congress could take away the anti-trust agreement not, but cannot enforce it retroactively for names of failed tests.

Heck, many of us here hate our employers, government interference in out lives (like asking for ID in airports), or other information gathering, yet, some want a sealed court document be released by "the employer". Any court should find MLB guilty of a workplace violation. How you anyone who would like MLB to release name think about if their employer, regardless of nation, publicly sent out a memo that you failed a drug test and named the substance(s)? This is unlike an arrest therefore public record.

Deadspin From Tuesday

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The records should never have been sealed to begin with. There are no minors involved, there is no threat to national security and if the information in it is true then it's hardly defamation of character. This move was simply to avoid embarrassment and potential fan backlash. That the public knows the existence of said document is damaging already. Sweeping previous mentioned dog crap under the rug does not make it go away. I would argue it makes it worse.

The players union should hardly be in a position to negotiate this particular document to be sealed. They, like the players themselves and MLB looked the other way knowing full well steroids were running rampant. One of the responsibilities of any union is to look out for the safety and best interests of its members. Allowing them to participate in a physically unsafe (however voluntary) and illegal activity (regardless that MLB lacked outright rules & testing against it), is completely contradictory of its very existence. Seriously, can you imagine a union in any other industry getting away with allowing their members to partake in a dangerous and life threatening activity- especially in co-operation with the industry itself? Yes, a union is suppose to work an industry to be sure the workers are being treated proper, but they also have responsibility to be sure the workers also maintain standards. The fact that the players' union has also hindered the proper testing and investigation of steroids, shows that it is also very much part of the problem. In fact, I would go further to say that they are in some ways more guilty for allowing this to continue.

The union already has many black marks against it. It is far too powerful for its own good, it has taken many pointless positions against MLB and even against the players it professes to defend. Many steps MLB could take to potentially improve the game have been met with a reflexive stonewall tactic by the union. This is not to say that MLB's lack of progress can be blamed solely on the union, but it can be said they are indeed a big part of the problems.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jeromy Burnitz was on the list twice, #70 and #96.

Not on this list. #96 is listed as Oliver Perez.

Maybe you're right and the list is nonsense. I would say again that MLB should just bite the bullet, release the damn list and get it over with. It'll either confirm the above list or prove it to be otherwise. In any event, it would bring this whole affair into the light. Then and only then would the sport have any real possibility of being able to deal with the issue and move on. Otherwise, it will always be the festering pile of dog crap in the middle of the room that no one wants to address. Eventually somebody has got to pick up this mess.

Where have you been the last decade? It's already been in the light. The only people who need to come to grips with the issue of this being another "era" in baseball are those holier-than-thou media types in their ivory towers filled with nostalgia.

As for the list in particular....Names are getting slowly released because of subpoenas in court procedings over the BALCO case since the Federal Government seized the list. MLB guaranteed anonymity to the union for the tests, and it would have existed to this day had the Players Association actually had the sense to destroy the records like they should have.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The records should never have been sealed to begin with. There are no minors involved, there is no threat to national security and if the information in it is true then it's hardly defamation of character. This move was simply to avoid embarrassment and potential fan backlash. That the public knows the existence of said document is damaging already. Sweeping previous mentioned dog crap under the rug does not make it go away. I would argue it makes it worse.

The players union should hardly be in a position to negotiate this particular document to be sealed. They, like the players themselves and MLB looked the other way knowing full well steroids were running rampant. One of the responsibilities of any union is to look out for the safety and best interests of its members. Allowing them to participate in a physically unsafe (however voluntary) and illegal activity (regardless that MLB lacked outright rules & testing against it), is completely contradictory of its very existence. Seriously, can you imagine a union in any other industry getting away with allowing their members to partake in a dangerous and life threatening activity- especially in co-operation with the industry itself? Yes, a union is suppose to work an industry to be sure the workers are being treated proper, but they also have responsibility to be sure the workers also maintain standards. The fact that the players' union has also hindered the proper testing and investigation of steroids, shows that it is also very much part of the problem. In fact, I would go further to say that they are in some ways more guilty for allowing this to continue.

The union already has many black marks against it. It is far too powerful for its own good, it has taken many pointless positions against MLB and even against the players it professes to defend. Many steps MLB could take to potentially improve the game have been met with a reflexive stonewall tactic by the union. This is not to say that MLB's lack of progress can be blamed solely on the union, but it can be said they are indeed a big part of the problems.

I couldn't agree with you more. I'm not a big fan of this Union either.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.