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Possible leak of MLB 2003 Steroid List


Bleujayone

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The records should never have been sealed to begin with. There are no minors involved, there is no threat to national security and if the information in it is true then it's hardly defamation of character. This move was simply to avoid embarrassment and potential fan backlash. That the public knows the existence of said document is damaging already. Sweeping previous mentioned dog crap under the rug does not make it go away. I would argue it makes it worse.

The players union should hardly be in a position to negotiate this particular document to be sealed. They, like the players themselves and MLB looked the other way knowing full well steroids were running rampant. One of the responsibilities of any union is to look out for the safety and best interests of its members. Allowing them to participate in a physically unsafe (however voluntary) and illegal activity (regardless that MLB lacked outright rules & testing against it), is completely contradictory of its very existence. Seriously, can you imagine a union in any other industry getting away with allowing their members to partake in a dangerous and life threatening activity- especially in co-operation with the industry itself? Yes, a union is suppose to work an industry to be sure the workers are being treated proper, but they also have responsibility to be sure the workers also maintain standards. The fact that the players' union has also hindered the proper testing and investigation of steroids, shows that it is also very much part of the problem. In fact, I would go further to say that they are in some ways more guilty for allowing this to continue.

The union already has many black marks against it. It is far too powerful for its own good, it has taken many pointless positions against MLB and even against the players it professes to defend. Many steps MLB could take to potentially improve the game have been met with a reflexive stonewall tactic by the union. This is not to say that MLB's lack of progress can be blamed solely on the union, but it can be said they are indeed a big part of the problems.

And the NFL/NFLPA is...?

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Unions just try to do what is best for their workers - most money, most freedoms, most protections, etc. There are two sides to any negotiation, and at some point, the owners must have decided that it's not worth a prolonged work stoppage (more than the '81 and '94 strikes) and just gave in to most of what the union wanted. Don't blame the union, blame the owners.

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Well, there are at least 3 guys on there who couldn't muster a good season even with illegal substances. I'm looking at you, Ben Weber (although I always liked his windup), Hector Almonte (who?), and Matt Herges (again, who?).

And, for the record, I'm glad I don't see the name "Jim Edmonds" on there. My world would be crushed for a few minutes.

I nominate David Ortiz for "least surprising".

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This list looks a hell of alot like the fake list that was leaked an hour before the real Mitchell Report was released.

I'm not buying this at all.

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Echoing what some others here have said, I'm glad that I haven't seen Ken Griffey Jr. or Jim Edmonds on this list. Those two and also Albert Pujols.

However: Why shouldn't this list be released? Seriously, more good will come to us, the fans, and the game itself, knowing who have and who haven't taken steroids. This has festered out of control.

Best policy from here on out (though easier said than done): ZERO TOLERANCE!! Steroids has done enough damage to baseball!!

If Selig and Fehr (sp?, former union president) hadn't done so much pussyfooting around with steroid use, and if the fans were made aware of who has and who hasn't, then we wouldn't be in this mess.

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However: Why shouldn't this list be released?

Because a deal is a deal, that's why.

This was not a deal any of the paying customers asked for. And deals are broken and reversed all the time.

If there was a deal automakers and autoworkers unions made to bury a report on illegal manufacturing practices, and people were aware of the existence of such a report, I would hardly think consumers would sit by- even if no one could prove harm.

This was a "deal" to hide a report of wrongdoing. It was done to avoid the consequence of disclosure. They had proof of specific guilty parties involved, and the heads of all involved decided it would be better to deny the information rather than own up to the mistakes committed by all and try to atone for them. If baseball were actually serious about their integrity they'd accept there is something very wrong and share in the blame and repair.

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However: Why shouldn't this list be released?

Because a deal is a deal, that's why.

This was not a deal any of the paying customers asked for. And deals are broken and reversed all the time.

If there was a deal automakers and autoworkers unions made to bury a report on illegal manufacturing practices, and people were aware of the existence of such a report, I would hardly think consumers would sit by- even if no one could prove harm.

This was a "deal" to hide a report of wrongdoing. It was done to avoid the consequence of disclosure. They had proof of specific guilty parties involved, and the heads of all involved decided it would be better to deny the information rather than own up to the mistakes committed by all and try to atone for them. If baseball were actually serious about their integrity they'd accept there is something very wrong and share in the blame and repair.

Such a position is fine in Idealtopia. However, Idealtopia is a fictional place. Kind of like the Garden of Eden actually.

In "reality", which is a place we do live in, compromise is necessary. If a deal hadn't been made, it is likely the Union would have never acceded to any testing in the first place. Which is probably worse from an "integrity" standpoint.

Of course, the auto manufacturer analogy is somewhat flawed. The only people being "harmed" are the players, and they do so voluntarily. Much different than sending a family of 5 out to die in a shoddy vehicle methinks.

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I have a better idea to see who's on the list.

Let's go read both books that Canseco wrote. We'll write down all the names he mentions, and use that as the master list.

You'll notice that no one Canseco has named has even considered filing a lawsuit.

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