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Best font for resume?

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What I would do is write it in something plain and boring to start with (a tnr or arial) then mess about with the font and find something you like, and you think still looks professional. I think its worth finding something difficult, just to make it more individual, but its got to be something you are comfortable with.

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Mixing a serif and a sans is not a violation. In fact, it is encouraged. When mixing typefaces, it is best to use two typefaces that contrast heavily. Serif and sans, wild and subdued, black and roman, and so on. There need to be characteristics to differentiate them. Mixing Helvetica and Futura? Bad idea. Too similar. Mixing Times and News Gothic? Good idea. Sufficient contrast in style.

Also, the old wives' tale about serif fonts being more legible than sans is just that; a myth. Ever see a serif font on a highway sign? Something that's sole purpose is to be read and identified as soon and from as far away as possible? If there is any noticeable difference, it only applies to extremely long passages of text, like novels, dictionaries, essays and the like. A résumé need not adhere for this reason. With that said, a serif says, 'classic' and a sans says, 'modern.' No bones about it.

Microsoft Word résumés are so 1998. The .pdf is where it's at. A .pdf will allow you to use any font you want without fear of it turning default on your potential employer, and they are perfectly acceptable to any hiring manager worth his or her salt.

Some good choices:

SERIF

Caslon

Garamond

Times (universal)

Georgia (universal)

SANS

Franklin Gothic

Akzidenz Grotesk

News Gothic

Helvetica (universal)

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can a PDF be scanned for keywords though? If an employer is looking for a skill with a certain software package (I currently specialize in legal and SEC Compliance software) and they use one of those systems that parses out text looking for certain words or phrases, will the pdf work?

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They should be, unless you created the PDF in a way that converted text to outlines (say, in Illustrator), the text should be identifiable as just that, text. So the reader should have no problems searching for specific words.

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Here is a question. Do you Design your resume or do you keep it simple. I am going to be applying for a designer position and wondering if a more creative resume is better or not.

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Here is a question. Do you Design your resume or do you keep it simple. I am going to be applying for a designer position and wondering if a more creative resume is better or not.

Those aren't mutually exclusive goals. I expect both from résumés I receive in our design studio, certainly for applicants applying as designers. I would be looking for page layout skills; whitespace, typography and the grid.

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Comic Sans

Just kidding.

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Can I toss in an idea from out of left field?

Try the oddball approach...and go with a font most wouldn't dare go near in a situation such as this...or ever:

Courier New.

I mean, after all, is that not the default font when coding in CSS/HTML/writing replies in this forum? Some kind of crazy way, I think that might both catch your employer's eye (especially if he has any kind of programming background) and provide a bit of a subliminal boost, if you catch my drift.

Just my two-cent suggestion. Try it out at your own leisure/risk.

This thread might be dead, but I figured I'd comment anyway.

I read resumes all the time, and honestly, when someone uses courier new, it's the first one I read. I find it to be the most "user-friendly" font in terms of spacing and easy-on-the-eyesedness. It's an advantage on the resume front for sure, because often times, when I have a pile of new applicants, I sometimes don't even get to every resume...if yours, based on font gets to the top of the pile, you're definitely more likely to get an interview from me.

After fonts, the next thing I look for is spacing. Any resume that has more than three lines of font in a row (other than a cover letter) is a BIG minus. If you can't explain what your background is/what your duties were at a former job/what your education is/other interesting facts in three lines or less, I certainly don't have time to interview you.

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There are some good templates on the current Microsoft Word package. The one I use is from there, its colourful (header and headings) and looks pretty neat. I also take the header and use it for my cover letter. I guess having a nice resume is pointless if your cover letter looks plain and boring. It got me an interview for later this week, but I'm in the outdoor ed industry so things may be a bit different....

I also prefer to post my applications because it looks better in hard copy and also, the potential employer has a copy of it in their hands. THey've got to physically open the envelope and more likely to remember to get back to you as opposed to an email which they will probably click 'next'.....

Everyone has different thoughts I guess, but I guess 'good luck' to everyone...

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Can I toss in an idea from out of left field?

Try the oddball approach...and go with a font most wouldn't dare go near in a situation such as this...or ever:

Courier New.

I mean, after all, is that not the default font when coding in CSS/HTML/writing replies in this forum? Some kind of crazy way, I think that might both catch your employer's eye (especially if he has any kind of programming background) and provide a bit of a subliminal boost, if you catch my drift.

Just my two-cent suggestion. Try it out at your own leisure/risk.

This thread might be dead, but I figured I'd comment anyway.

I read resumes all the time, and honestly, when someone uses courier new, it's the first one I read. I find it to be the most "user-friendly" font in terms of spacing and easy-on-the-eyesedness. It's an advantage on the resume front for sure, because often times, when I have a pile of new applicants, I sometimes don't even get to every resume...if yours, based on font gets to the top of the pile, you're definitely more likely to get an interview from me.

After fonts, the next thing I look for is spacing. Any resume that has more than three lines of font in a row (other than a cover letter) is a BIG minus. If you can't explain what your background is/what your duties were at a former job/what your education is/other interesting facts in three lines or less, I certainly don't have time to interview you.

If I ever got a resume set in Courier New, I'd laugh it all the way to the bottom of the stack. It's a manuscript font. Sure it will get you noticed, but not in a good way. Courier reminds me of high school slackers who come up a little short on their research paper. 'Just set it in Courier to turn five and a half pages into seven!' Teachers eventually figured this out and outlawed Courier. It's made to be edited. A resume does not fit that criteria.

And if you don't have time to read more than three lines about an applicant's experience, you don't have time to interview anyone, to be quite honest.

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Comic Sans

Ahhh, yes. If anything says "I mean business", it would be that font .... Right, Dan Gilbert?

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Comic Sans

Ahhh, yes. If anything says "I mean business", it would be that font .... Right, Dan Gilbert?

One school I attended used this font for their newsletter. Annoyed the hell out of me!

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