slats7

Logoed airplanes

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I live very close to BWI Airport so a lot of low-flying planes go over my house. Last Saturday, I saw a Indianapolis Colts AirTran plain which was weird because the colts weren't playing the Ravens that Sunday, so I don't know what it's business in Maryland was...

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I live very close to BWI Airport so a lot of low-flying planes go over my house. Last Saturday, I saw a Indianapolis Colts AirTran plain which was weird because the colts weren't playing the Ravens that Sunday, so I don't know what it's business in Maryland was...

Back when the Seahawks and Alaska Air had the "Seahawk One" I posted earlier, it was put into general use when not flying the team around. The seats had nameplates for which players sat there, so you could say "I sat in the same seat as Steve Largent!"

That would be my guess as to why you saw the Colts plane...

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I live very close to BWI Airport so a lot of low-flying planes go over my house. Last Saturday, I saw a Indianapolis Colts AirTran plain which was weird because the colts weren't playing the Ravens that Sunday, so I don't know what it's business in Maryland was...

Back when the Seahawks and Alaska Air had the "Seahawk One" I posted earlier, it was put into general use when not flying the team around. The seats had nameplates for which players sat there, so you could say "I sat in the same seat as Steve Largent!"

That would be my guess as to why you saw the Colts plane...

Aren't the colts playing at the Redskins on Monday night? BWI isn't that far from Landover, nor is it as busy as Dullas so I'd imagine they just decided to fly into BWI.

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I live very close to BWI Airport so a lot of low-flying planes go over my house. Last Saturday, I saw a Indianapolis Colts AirTran plain which was weird because the colts weren't playing the Ravens that Sunday, so I don't know what it's business in Maryland was...

Back when the Seahawks and Alaska Air had the "Seahawk One" I posted earlier, it was put into general use when not flying the team around. The seats had nameplates for which players sat there, so you could say "I sat in the same seat as Steve Largent!"

That would be my guess as to why you saw the Colts plane...

Aren't the colts playing at the Redskins on Monday night? BWI isn't that far from Landover, nor is it as busy as Dullas so I'd imagine they just decided to fly into BWI.

No, this was last Saturday and they would probably fly into Dulles or National (in DC). Or maybe they would fly into BWI, but it was last Saturday, so it doesn't matter.

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I live very close to BWI Airport so a lot of low-flying planes go over my house. Last Saturday, I saw a Indianapolis Colts AirTran plain which was weird because the colts weren't playing the Ravens that Sunday, so I don't know what it's business in Maryland was...

Back when the Seahawks and Alaska Air had the "Seahawk One" I posted earlier, it was put into general use when not flying the team around. The seats had nameplates for which players sat there, so you could say "I sat in the same seat as Steve Largent!"

That would be my guess as to why you saw the Colts plane...

Aren't the colts playing at the Redskins on Monday night? BWI isn't that far from Landover, nor is it as busy as Dullas so I'd imagine they just decided to fly into BWI.

No, this was last Saturday and they would probably fly into Dulles or National (in DC). Or maybe they would fly into BWI, but it was last Saturday, so it doesn't matter.

The AirTran plane with the Colts livery is not the Colts charter. That AirTran plane is a B717, which is too small to carry an NFL team in terms of a charter (100 passengers), plus, it is range is about 2000 miles. A team needs a B757 (or Airbus equivalent, A320) as a minimum since they have cargo issues too.

Being an airline sponsor for a team does not necessarily equate to being selected as their charter operator.

For the NFL, the charter airlines are the following:

Arizona Cardinals: Delta

Atlanta Falcons: Delta

Baltimore Ravens: Delta

Buffalo Bills: They use anyone (Continental, Delta)

Carolina Panthers: US Airways

Chicago Bears: United

Cincinnati Bengals: Delta

Cleveland Browns: Delta

Dallas Cowboys: American

Denver Broncos: United

Detroit Lions: Delta

Green Bay Packers: Delta

Houston Texans: Continental/United

Indianapolis Colts: Delta

Jacksonvill Jaguars: Delta

Kansas City Chiefs: Delta

Miami Dolphins: American

Minnesota Vikings: Delta

New England Patriots: Delta

New Orleans Saints: Delta

New York Giants: Continental/United

New York Jets: Continental/United

Oakland Raiders: Hawaiian

Philadelphia Eagles: Delta

Pittsburgh Steelers: US Airways

San Diego Chargers: Delta

San Francisco 49ers: Delta, but used United for the ATL game

Seattle Seahawks: Hawaiian

St. Louis Rams: Delta

Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Continental/United

Tennessee Titans: Delta

Washington Redskins: United

Virgin Atlantic is the carrier for both Denver and SF for the game in London.

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One of my jobs at AA was coordinating 'special operations' like charters and aircraft filming and dfwabel is correct, these paintjobs are flying billboards for marketing purposes only. I explained about maintenance routings in the 'Secrets of the Airline Industry' thread and that's just one of the challenges involved in having a specific plane available for a charter on a given day. It involves a huge commitment of time and resources, especially for very large carriers like American and Delta, and so the only time it usually happens is if the team is flying off to the World Series or Super Bowl.

For the curious, here's what usually happens with charters: Crew Sked allots pilots and F/As but the aircraft is specified by type only up until a day or two before. An Ops Analyst at the airline's control center (System Operations Control* at AA) prepares a very detailed Ops Order that spells out all the who, what, why, where, and how of the charter. Much of it is the same as a scheduled flight, departure/arrival times, origin/destination, and the specific aircraft, which would be determined by then. Where you had to be careful was anything not like a normal flight.

For example, a colleague did an Ops Order for the White House press corps. Their plane usually lands just before Air Force One so they can be set up and waiting when the President arrives. The destination was one of the L.A. satellite airports, maybe Long Beach or Ontario, I can't recall. My colleage forgot a step, the one instructing the pilots to taxi after landing to a general aviation area on the opposite side of the airport from AA's usual gates.

When the charter landed, since they had no instructions to the contrary, the pilots did what they would normally do, taxied over to AA's gates and asked local Ops which one to take. Of course local Ops didn't expect the plane but everyone thought it was in the right place but local Ops just hadn't been informed. In the cabin, the reporters knew where they were supposed to be deplaning so they were yelling at the F/As. General confusion ensued and by the time it was straightened out and the plane made its way across the airport, President Clinton was in his limo headed to town. :cry:

For my colleague, that's what we called a 'CLM' (career-limiting move).

* From aa.com:

===

System Operations Control Center

Located in a three-story building near DFW Airport, the System Operations Control Center is the nerve center of the worldwide American Airlines route network, coordinating the day-to-day, minute-by-minute operation of the airline. Years ago, many of SOC’s activities were performed at key regional locations like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles. Now, all of these critical operational oversight functions are consolidated in one major, cutting-edge operating center – SOC. Today, SOC must manage a global, complex, and fast-moving network of people, aircraft, equipment and facilities, with safety and customer service top priorities.

Overall, SOC fulfills two major needs for American: 1) The need to coordinate and monitor daily and minute-by-minute operating decisions on a centralized, system-wide basis for what is now a global network, and 2) The need to meet Federal Aviation Regulations for operational control of the route system and the decisions that affect those operations. In doing this, SOC:

Manages System Operating Integrity

Safety (in flight and on the ground)

Customer Service (dependability)

Communications (flow of operational information)

Manages System Balance

Aircraft (availability, substitutions, spare airplanes)

People (flight crews, ground employees, passengers)

Airports (Air Traffic Control, construction, closures)

Facilities (gates, terminals, ground transportation)

Airspace (weather, route congestion)

SOC is managed by a total of four Center Managers and eight Sector Managers who, working in shifts around the clock:

Act as full-time representatives of top management for monitoring and effectively controlling the use of Company resources.

Consider the entire operation, anticipate events, and resolve competing interests.

Manage any abnormal or emergency situation that affects any part of the airline, its passengers, it employees or its facilities.

Key functional areas of SOC include:

Flight Dispatch – 176 FAA certified flight dispatchers are assigned to more than 30 Dispatch Desks, working 27 geographical areas. They are co-responsible with AA’s Captains for the safety of flight operations.

Weight and Balance – A total of 70 highly trained Weight and Balance people establish a working Load Plan to field locations for all AA departures systemwide

Flight Planning Support – A team of 14 highly trained people ensures the accuracy of the flight plan route database, covering more than 10,000 routes worldwide.

Corporate Complaint Resolution – A team of eight senior analysts works to ensure maximum accessibility for travelers with disabilities or medical conditions.

Air Traffic Systems – Two managers interface with 22 Regional Air Route Traffic Control Centers to help manage air traffic issues.

Operations Coordinators – This team of experts helps manage unplanned operational events such as those presented by hurricanes, winter snow and ice storms and summer severe weather conditions.

Command Center -- In the heart of SOC, the Command Center becomes the system-wide focal point for managing emergencies and serious service disruptions.

===

I worked there for 8 years and no one will ever convince me there's a cooler place to work, at least for a lifelong airline geek. This isn't me but it's a great view looking down from the command center to the dispatch floor.

Fellows+039.jpg

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Using the best state flag in the nation:

maryland1.jpg

Saying that Maryland has the best flag in the union will get no argument from me, but SWEET JEEBUS that is one FUGLY lookin' jet!

I don't know, it doesn't look to shabby when you see it in person.

I was gonna post this earlier, but I never got to it. Last Sunday, I saw that plane go over my street at about the same place the Colts plane was. I thought it looked great.

Now, are their more than one of these planes or is this a freak coincidence that I keep seeing uniquely logoed airplanes?

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Howsabout this blast from the past, August 22, 1958?

5114724052_31b692de33_b.jpg

NEW BEECHCRAFT TWIN-BONANZA for the Milwaukee Braves is admired by Joseph Cairnes, center, Milwaukee club president, and Lynn Stone, left, manager of the Wichita Braves, along with Leddy Greever, Beech vice-president - commercial sales. The six-place, twin-engine executive transport will be used to fly Braves officials to business points and farm team locations. Supercharged, the Twin-Bonanza has a top speed of 240 mph. The plane is trimmed with Braves insignia on fuselage and baseballs on nose section.

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Just out of curiosity...

does anyone think it would be possible to make a template for an airplane similar to that used for the helmets (eg Davidsons thread).

I know there are loads out there for Flight Sim games but they dont provide a finished picture without putting it into the game itself.

Considering the size of the aerospace industry there must be a 3D render model out there. Maybe someone knows of one, been looking myself but didnt find anything.

Obviously I could use a plain aircraft and just draw on top of that but the results wouldnt be as good and thought it would be worth asking in here to see what peoples thoughts are.

Would be great if its possible because then I could combine my two great passions of sports and aircraft (being an aerospace engineering student).

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Honestly I like the Falcons one the best,it has a unique design taken from the arms on the jersey.

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Just seeing this thread now, I like it.

I was sitting at the Alaska gate at Seattle last month and saw an U of Idaho plane on the way in and an Oregon plane on the way out. Should hace snapped a picture.

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