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ThePreacher

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My rule of thumb is that if the nickname includes a modifier, it's minor league. Just off of the top of my head, I can't think of any exceptions to this rule. I'm not sure about the Maple Leafs - is the actual leaf called a "Maple Leaf", or is maple an adjective? I guess it would get grandfathered in because it's so old, but if the team was named today, we'd probably laugh at that name.

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And even though said movie wasn't very good...

HEY! Bite your tongue! :P

The first one was your average 90s kids sports movie. Nothing great, or even above average, but it wasn't terrible, considering the intended audience. D2, however, was a steaming pile of cinematic :censored: Team USA ditches their uniforms for Mighty Ducks unis? Really? And they switch the goalie and sniper to give the sniper a clear shot, AND IT WORKS? There's suspension of disbelief and then there's insulting the intelligence of everyone who's ever played or seen a minuet of hockey in their life. And since when did Iceland become a hockey powerhouse?

D3 was pretty much the first one in prep school, only with more stupid moments.

Really though, it's not the fact that they named the team after movies I don't like that's my problem. It's that they're named after movies, period.

My rule of thumb is that if the nickname includes a modifier, it's minor league. Just off of the top of my head, I can't think of any exceptions to this rule. I'm not sure about the Maple Leafs - is the actual leaf called a "Maple Leaf", or is maple an adjective? I guess it would get grandfathered in because it's so old, but if the team was named today, we'd probably laugh at that name.

I'm not sure about Maple Leafs. I would think it wouldn't count because without it the name could refer to any kind of leaf, when in fact it's specifically suppose to be a maple leaf.

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My rule of thumb is that if the nickname includes a modifier, it's minor league. Just off of the top of my head, I can't think of any exceptions to this rule. I'm not sure about the Maple Leafs - is the actual leaf called a "Maple Leaf", or is maple an adjective? I guess it would get grandfathered in because it's so old, but if the team was named today, we'd probably laugh at that name.

"Maple Leaf" is a noun describing an object. Just as the Rocky Mountains is a Noun, not an adjective describing a noun.

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Wrong. A leaf is a leaf. The tree or plant determines what kind of leaf it is, so a maple (adj) tree (noun) gives us a maple (adj) leaf (noun). In other words, a maple leaf is just a leaf from a maple tree. Dig?

The Rocky Mountains are such because although they are rocky, and mountains, that can be said of any mountain range; however, since someone somewhere named them the Rocky Mountains (probably for famed boxer and statue Rocky Balboa, who grew up a mere 3000 miles away from them), they are their own proper noun.

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Wrong. A leaf is a leaf. The tree or plant determines what kind of leaf it is, so a maple (adj) tree (noun) gives us a maple (adj) leaf (noun). In other words, a maple leaf is just a leaf from a maple tree. Dig?

The Rocky Mountains are such because although they are rocky, and mountains, that can be said of any mountain range; however, since someone somewhere named them the Rocky Mountains (probably for famed boxer and statue Rocky Balboa, who grew up a mere 3000 miles away from them), they are their own proper noun.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/maple

Maple; noun

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Wrong. A leaf is a leaf. The tree or plant determines what kind of leaf it is, so a maple (adj) tree (noun) gives us a maple (adj) leaf (noun). In other words, a maple leaf is just a leaf from a maple tree. Dig?

HA! Do you honestly believe that? I feel sorry for you.

Maple Leaf is a proper noun.

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As I've read through this thread one thing stands out loud and clear. If it's not blue and white, doesn't have that 5,000 point leaf on it and it's west of Toronto, Ice Cap hates it. :hockeysmiley:

Not at all, but you keep on being you sparky.

I tried to be you for Halloween, Ice Cap. I found a Maple Leafs jersey, painted myself all blue and went out trick or treating. I kept getting the same reaction, "What are you Jack Frost? Christmas ain't for another friggin' two months! Get outta here!!!"

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Wrong. A leaf is a leaf. The tree or plant determines what kind of leaf it is, so a maple (adj) tree (noun) gives us a maple (adj) leaf (noun). In other words, a maple leaf is just a leaf from a maple tree. Dig?

HA! Do you honestly believe that? I feel sorry for you.

But he's right.

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Wrong. A leaf is a leaf. The tree or plant determines what kind of leaf it is, so a maple (adj) tree (noun) gives us a maple (adj) leaf (noun). In other words, a maple leaf is just a leaf from a maple tree. Dig?

HA! Do you honestly believe that? I feel sorry for you.

But he's right.

Interesting addition.

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Wrong. A leaf is a leaf. The tree or plant determines what kind of leaf it is, so a maple (adj) tree (noun) gives us a maple (adj) leaf (noun). In other words, a maple leaf is just a leaf from a maple tree. Dig?

HA! Do you honestly believe that? I feel sorry for you.

But he's right.

Except that he's wrong. This isn't a debatable point. "Maple Leaf" is in and of itself a noun. Maple is part of that noun, not an adjective. In fact maple isn't considered an adjective at all under any circumstances.

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Okay. I was taught that in, say, the sentence "I like maple syrup," "maple" is the adjective for the noun "syrup," distinguishing it from corn syrup or whatever. Nouns can be used as adjectives all the time. In the same sense, "maple" would modify "leaf," like "tin" modifies "can."

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Okay. I was taught that in, say, the sentence "I like maple syrup," "maple" is the adjective for the noun "syrup," distinguishing it from corn syrup or whatever. Nouns can be used as adjectives all the time. In the same sense, "maple" would modify "leaf," like "tin" modifies "can."

I don't know what to say other then, in the example you're using, you're just wrong. "Maple leaf" is a proper noun. There's not much to go into other then the fact that it, well, a noun.

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