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EPL Television Revenue Distributions


Mac the Knife

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Yeah, EPL money is unreal.

The largest single-game financial prize in all of sport: the Championship play-off game for promotion to the Premiership.

^Exactly. I'm hoping Reading can pull it off and get themselves back in the Premiership. But yeah, it's ridiculous how much you rake in with EPL money. Blackpool can finally finish their ground even though they're going back down.

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Yeah, EPL money is unreal.

The largest single-game financial prize in all of sport: the Championship play-off game for promotion to the Premiership.

^Exactly. I'm hoping Reading can pull it off and get themselves back in the Premiership. But yeah, it's ridiculous how much you rake in with EPL money. Blackpool can finally finish their ground even though they're going back down.

While it might be one of the most equitable leagues, it also means teams tend to come back up right away because they're still getting Premiership money a couple years after leaving the league.
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Yeah, EPL money is unreal.

The largest single-game financial prize in all of sport: the Championship play-off game for promotion to the Premiership.

^Exactly. I'm hoping Reading can pull it off and get themselves back in the Premiership. But yeah, it's ridiculous how much you rake in with EPL money. Blackpool can finally finish their ground even though they're going back down.

While it might be one of the most equitable leagues, it also means teams tend to come back up right away because they're still getting Premiership money a couple years after leaving the league.

See "Small Heath Alliance" for more information on this phenomenon.

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While it might be one of the most equitable leagues, it also means teams tend to come back up right away because they're still getting Premiership money a couple years after leaving the league.

True, but (i) tell that to Portsmouth (LOL), and (ii) that's kind of a good thing as I see it, as it encourages clubs to improve - or in the case of those relegated to maintain - for the next year. A definite improvement incentive across the board.

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While it might be one of the most equitable leagues, it also means teams tend to come back up right away because they're still getting Premiership money a couple years after leaving the league.

True, but (i) tell that to Portsmouth (LOL), and (ii) that's kind of a good thing as I see it, as it encourages clubs to improve - or in the case of those relegated to maintain - for the next year. A definite improvement incentive across the board.

It should be pointed out, as well, that none of the 3 sides coming into the EPL in 2011-12 were relegated last season. (Middlesboro, Burnley and the other team I won't mention all finahing as also rans!) the Championship is getting higher in standard, and in the world of soccer right now the parachute payments given to relegated clubs doesn't amount to much.)

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So if you get relegated, are you pretty much effed? How can you go sign good players or even convince free agents to sign with you if you aren't getting paid the big TV revenue and you aren't even in the top league anymore?

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So if you get relegated, are you pretty much effed? How can you go sign good players or even convince free agents to sign with you if you aren't getting paid the big TV revenue and you aren't even in the top league anymore?

Only to a certain extent. If relegates, the team still receives a ?parachute? payment" from the EPL money pool for four years. If the team comes back into the EPL, then they forfeit that money and return to the main pool of EPL monies. Even so, that is the dilemma which management of those teams near relegation have to deal with. The balance of spending all you have to win or to spend enough to be competitive and be in good financial shape if you are relegated.

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Yeah and you get the TV money from the Football league. They are in a slightly stronger position than the rest of the championship (the second tier).

And most clubs that could get relegated have contracts that mean players get payed less for playing in the Championship.

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Why on earth would any decent player sign with a team that's even a little bit in danger of being relegated? If I'm a good player, I'd never sign a contract with a marginal team that could result in me getting paid less if the team blows and gets sent down. It seems like it's a system that keeps the haves at the top, and the have nots at the bottom (sound familiar?) Of course I know nothing about soccer so maybe I'm thinking about this all wrong.

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Why on earth would any decent player sign with a team that's even a little bit in danger of being relegated? If I'm a good player, I'd never sign a contract with a marginal team that could result in me getting paid less if the team blows and gets sent down. It seems like it's a system that keeps the haves at the top, and the have nots at the bottom (sound familiar?) Of course I know nothing about soccer so maybe I'm thinking about this all wrong.

Some players ego are big enough to believe they can be the vital player, I guess. But also the wage for any premier league player would be larger than 90% of championship players. Even pretty mediocre role players can turn out to be a drag on the wage bill if a team is relegated.

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Why on earth would any decent player sign with a team that's even a little bit in danger of being relegated? If I'm a good player, I'd never sign a contract with a marginal team that could result in me getting paid less if the team blows and gets sent down. It seems like it's a system that keeps the haves at the top, and the have nots at the bottom (sound familiar?) Of course I know nothing about soccer so maybe I'm thinking about this all wrong.

Some players ego are big enough to believe they can be the vital player, I guess. But also the wage for any premier league player would be larger than 90% of championship players. Even pretty mediocre role players can turn out to be a drag on the wage bill if a team is relegated.

You have to play where you can play and get a job. In most cases, if you are a guy dropped from a squad, there is a reason why and you were released from a team and not "transfered" to another team for some fee.

Also remember that if a player is "transfered" (aka traded) the team moving the player either pays or receives the "transfer fee". So the team who is more cash-strapped can sell a player then use that cash to buy a lower salaried player and still have money left over. Think of it like an unsuccessful, small market MLB team trading their highest paid player to another team for players and cash, and they still receive "Luxury tax" money on top of what the participating team gave them in cash back.

One thing to keep in mind is that "free agency" in soccer is different than in US pro sports. Even if you are released, if you want to remain playing in sometimes your options are much more limited.

In 2006, Juventus was relegated to Italy's #2 league due to a match fixing scandal. Some star players stayed (Nedved, Buffon, Del Piero) while others left (Viera, Cannavaro,

Then there is the Bosman Ruling (the EU version of Curt Flood v. Kuhn) for more caveats on where players can play , but that is another story.

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While it might be one of the most equitable leagues, it also means teams tend to come back up right away because they're still getting Premiership money a couple years after leaving the league.

True, but (i) tell that to Portsmouth (LOL), and (ii) that's kind of a good thing as I see it, as it encourages clubs to improve - or in the case of those relegated to maintain - for the next year. A definite improvement incentive across the board.

It should be pointed out, as well, that none of the 3 sides coming into the EPL in 2011-12 were relegated last season. (Middlesboro, Burnley and the other team I won't mention all finahing as also rans!) the Championship is getting higher in standard, and in the world of soccer right now the parachute payments given to relegated clubs doesn't amount to much.)

Its Middlesbrough.

Oh, and Burnley, Hull City, and Middlesbrough finished 8th, 11th, and 12th in a 24 club league. Hardly 'also rans'.

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While it might be one of the most equitable leagues, it also means teams tend to come back up right away because they're still getting Premiership money a couple years after leaving the league.

True, but (i) tell that to Portsmouth (LOL), and (ii) that's kind of a good thing as I see it, as it encourages clubs to improve - or in the case of those relegated to maintain - for the next year. A definite improvement incentive across the board.

It should be pointed out, as well, that none of the 3 sides coming into the EPL in 2011-12 were relegated last season. (Middlesboro, Burnley and the other team I won't mention all finahing as also rans!) the Championship is getting higher in standard, and in the world of soccer right now the parachute payments given to relegated clubs doesn't amount to much.)

Its Middlesbrough.

Oh, and Burnley, Hull City, and Middlesbrough finished 8th, 11th, and 12th in a 24 club league. Hardly 'also rans'.

Seems the perfect definition of also rans to me!

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