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2011NCAA Football Thread


Gary

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A lot of the losses come from the school accepting a bowl bid and the fans not showing up- so they have to buy back the tickets. Don't blame the bowl system, blame those fans.

So as an Ohio State alum and fan, I should get the blame for not wanting to drop a couple grand on a trip to the Gator Bowl to watch two 6-6 teams? Interesting.

In a way. I don't see anyone else to point the finger at. You want your team to do well and you want your team to land a great bowl game to finish up the season...then when it's prime time to support them, you back off and that school is put into a situation where they have to financially cover for you.

Who else can be blamed here? I hate we are even looking at it as the Blame Game, but I didn't bring that up.

You can't have it both ways- hope your team does well but then bitch about the losses your program takes for going to the bowl game you were pulling for them to reach. Just doesn't make sense to me. No one forces these teams into bowl games...there may be influence and pressure- but they can always decline. I'm just saying don't blame the bowl games- blame the athletic program and their fans/boosters.

Remember that now the secondary ticket market can give an alumnus better seats for less cost than what the school may charge them. The secondary market provides better seats for the same cost if not less.

A Feburary 2011 Athletic Business story:

In honor of its 14th consecutive bowl appearance, Georgia Tech offered $14 tickets to the Independence Bowl in Shreveport, La., but still only sold slightly more than half of its 10,000-ticket allotment. Atlantic Coast Conference brethren Boston College, Clemson and North Carolina experienced similar struggles, falling between 4,000 and 5,000 tickets short of selling out. Virginia Tech, which lost $1.77 million due to unsold Orange Bowl tickets in 2009, fared worst of all, failing to sell 11,000 tickets from its allotment of 17,500 for this year's Jan. 3 Orange Bowl. "There are two groups of people who go to bowl games," says Zach Lassiter, assistant athletic director for ticket operations at the University of Utah, and a charter member of NCAA Proactive Ticket Sales Professionals, a peer group that shares best practices. "Every school has that base of people for whom it doesn't matter who you're playing or where they game is, they're going to go. It's become their family's holiday tradition. There's the second group of fans for whom everything factors in ? the opponent, the city, how economically they can travel to the game."

While Utah's bowl base is growing, it's not enough to cover a given ticket allotment, according to Lassiter, who came within 2,000 tickets of selling out his 11,000-ticket allotment for the Dec. 22 Maaco Las Vegas Bowl against media darling Boise State.

Virginia Tech's latest ticket troubles came despite Hokies' head coach Frank Beamer encouraging reporters at a press conference following the ACC championship game to "be sure to tell our fans to buy their Orange Bowl tickets through us, not anywhere else."

Beyond staying home, fans indeed have options. Not only do the bowls retain the best seats for their own sales efforts, the secondary ticket market often has deals too good for fans to ignore. "That is an issue that I and my colleagues, other athletic directors, have been fighting for the last couple of years," Virginia Tech athletic director Jim Weaver told The Virginian-Pilot in mid-December. "We could sell more of our tickets if we had better tickets to sell."

Mercifully, the ACC doesn't leave its members entirely on the hook. Schools are responsible for the first 6,000 tickets and partially responsible for the next 2,000. The conference covers any unsold tickets beyond that. Some conferences, including the Pac-10 and Big 12, absorb the cost of any and all unsold bowl tickets. On the other end of the spectrum sits the Big East. "We pay our BCS rep $2 million to go to the game, and then we also have a travel allowance, which will come to about $300,000," says Big East associate commissioner John Paquette. "But the league does not share in ticket losses."

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Georgia Tech would struggle to sell its ticket allotment if they played in the Chick-Fil-A Bowl down the street from campus. Why the bowl committees in El Paso and Shreveport thought it was a good idea to invite Tech is beyond me.

1. The ACC has a contract with the Sun Bowl

2. They were an 8-4 ACC team. They had to go somewhere.

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Georgia Tech would struggle to sell its ticket allotment if they played in the Chick-Fil-A Bowl down the street from campus. Why the bowl committees in El Paso and Shreveport thought it was a good idea to invite Tech is beyond me.

Bowl committees do it because the schools via conferences allow them to do it. Since TV money is pooled then distributed to all teams, the bowl does not care, but the school is still on the hook for the cost of the seats. Until recently, the Citrus/Capital One Bowl was the best bowl to go to as they formerly paid for team travel and even band hotel rooms. That was a cost which the schools did not have to factor into their expenses.

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Georgia Tech would struggle to sell its ticket allotment if they played in the Chick-Fil-A Bowl down the street from campus. Why the bowl committees in El Paso and Shreveport thought it was a good idea to invite Tech is beyond me.

I swear I think my daughters and I were the only Ga. Tech fan at that game last year. The fact that they were playing Air Force, with huge Barksdale AFB in adjacent Bossier City, didn't help the fan balance.

Walking to the game, I had no tickets, was going to buy them at the gate with a credit card as I only had $20 in cash (I was going to hit an ATM in the stadium). A passer-by sold me three decent tickets for $15 TOTAL (that's right, $5 each).

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The NCAA has given Ohio State a one-year bowl ban.

plus...

I haven't heard anything else.

EDIT:

The NCAA has given Ohio State a one-year bowl ban.

Source? I thought the ruling was coming down at 3?

Ok, I have more. From Joe Schad: "Bowl ban for 2012, loss of additional scholarships & additional probation, show-cause penalty for Jim Tressel, source says"

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Check the new thread concerning the NCAA Sanctions on tOSU.

While early, your new thread could just be renamed for the 2012 NCAA season since the penalties directly relate to the 2012 season and in line to how the 2011 thread has the initial post of tOSU ring selling.

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Wow, that's it? Surprisingly light. I was expecting much harsher penalties.

They're saving the harsher stuff for Miami and Penn State.

Fixed.

/Why are you listening to Schad anyway?

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So just like the first PAC 12 title game, the second Big Ten title game might see a division champ set aside in favor of a second place team. Wisconsin could be next year's UCLA.

Ugglier yet, we could have sanctions against Penn State and the fully intact Legends Winner, doing battle against a Leadgers "winner" from Wisc/ILL/Purdue/IND that that finishes third in the division. If Penn State and tOSU are both eliminated, Wisconsin almost makes it by default, and with their QB situation next year, they could get in finishing 3rd place at about 4-4. I don't think I'd be buying the t-shirt for that.

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