therocheapproach

Winnipeg Jets Primary Logo

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I think it's sad that such a beautifully simple idea is now considered bland because of all the visual overload we are used to and expect from a modern sports identity. I don't think it's all the way there, but the bones of this are top notch. You definitely do not need to add much, if anything.

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I think it's sad that such a beautifully simple idea is now considered bland because of all the visual overload we are used to and expect from a modern sports identity. I don't think it's all the way there, but the bones of this are top notch. You definitely do not need to add much, if anything.

I think the days of sports logos with multiple strokes and collages of symbols are over. The new trend is clearing the clutter and giving the team marks some room to become iconic, rather than trying to force it. And now, teams are adding more and more secondary logos to carry all the different iconographies, instead of cramming them all in one mark.

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Funny, I've been noticing (aside from college athletics) that teams are using less secondary logos...but getting much better use out of the one or two supporting marks they have. Case in point: the new Nashville Predators. Primary is the saber-tooth tiger thing, depicting the nickname, secondary is the guitar-pick, indicative of the locale (music, and Tennessee). There's also that monogram I don't really care for all that much--but all three of them tie in together very well.

To Roche's point, I also believe the days of "overdone" logo packages are done. I think the former Jacksonville Jaguars package best illustrates the "old guard", if you will. There three different cat logos and at least three different wordmarks...then there's the two or three shield logos they had. Today, I believe they just have the cat head that's on the logo and that bridge-esque wordmark. Some teams only have one logo and one wordmark, and that works, too (see Lions, Detroit).

All in all, I agree with both Roche and Andrew in that we're starting to see much more streamlined and simplified branding identities, and I'm all for it. (Whether or not that makes it down to the minor-league sports levels I couldn't tell you.)

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Funny, I've been noticing (aside from college athletics) that teams are using less secondary logos...but getting much better use out of the one or two supporting marks they have. Case in point: the new Nashville Predators. Primary is the saber-tooth tiger thing, depicting the nickname, secondary is the guitar-pick, indicative of the locale (music, and Tennessee). There's also that monogram I don't really care for all that much--but all three of them tie in together very well.

To Roche's point, I also believe the days of "overdone" logo packages are done. I think the former Jacksonville Jaguars package best illustrates the "old guard", if you will. There three different cat logos and at least three different wordmarks...then there's the two or three shield logos they had. Today, I believe they just have the cat head that's on the logo and that bridge-esque wordmark. Some teams only have one logo and one wordmark, and that works, too (see Lions, Detroit).

All in all, I agree with both Roche and Andrew in that we're starting to see much more streamlined and simplified branding identities, and I'm all for it. (Whether or not that makes it down to the minor-league sports levels I couldn't tell you.)

Probably not, I think that the minor-league sports league, and college athletics will always remains a breeding grounds for experimental looks and multiple logos/wordmarks.

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Funny, I've been noticing (aside from college athletics) that teams are using less secondary logos...but getting much better use out of the one or two supporting marks they have. Case in point: the new Nashville Predators. Primary is the saber-tooth tiger thing, depicting the nickname, secondary is the guitar-pick, indicative of the locale (music, and Tennessee). There's also that monogram I don't really care for all that much--but all three of them tie in together very well.

To Roche's point, I also believe the days of "overdone" logo packages are done. I think the former Jacksonville Jaguars package best illustrates the "old guard", if you will. There three different cat logos and at least three different wordmarks...then there's the two or three shield logos they had. Today, I believe they just have the cat head that's on the logo and that bridge-esque wordmark. Some teams only have one logo and one wordmark, and that works, too (see Lions, Detroit).

All in all, I agree with both Roche and Andrew in that we're starting to see much more streamlined and simplified branding identities, and I'm all for it. (Whether or not that makes it down to the minor-league sports levels I couldn't tell you.)

Teams are going simpler with their identities, but because people aren't used to that, they generally are of the opinion that these newer, simpler identities are bland, which is the sad part. These nice, clutter-free identities get undeserved bad reputations.

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This is fantastic work. I might consider a custom number font (nothing crazy, but just modified enough to be noticeably not standard block - like the AZ Cardinals or Houston Texans.)

How would the crest would be applied to the jersey - would the circle be one piece and the jet be a second? I'm guessing you'd have one version of the crest with a white border, and one with a blue border, right?

How would the crest on the blue jersey look if it was an inverse rather than the same logo but with a different border? I doubt that you're going to be able to improve on what you have, but just curious. Anyway, besides possibly touching up the numbers, I wouldn't touch this one.

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Funny, I've been noticing (aside from college athletics) that teams are using less secondary logos...but getting much better use out of the one or two supporting marks they have. Case in point: the new Nashville Predators. Primary is the saber-tooth tiger thing, depicting the nickname, secondary is the guitar-pick, indicative of the locale (music, and Tennessee). There's also that monogram I don't really care for all that much--but all three of them tie in together very well.

To Roche's point, I also believe the days of "overdone" logo packages are done. I think the former Jacksonville Jaguars package best illustrates the "old guard", if you will. There three different cat logos and at least three different wordmarks...then there's the two or three shield logos they had. Today, I believe they just have the cat head that's on the logo and that bridge-esque wordmark. Some teams only have one logo and one wordmark, and that works, too (see Lions, Detroit).

All in all, I agree with both Roche and Andrew in that we're starting to see much more streamlined and simplified branding identities, and I'm all for it. (Whether or not that makes it down to the minor-league sports levels I couldn't tell you.)

I also like the idea of streamlined identities. I'm definitely not a fan of the "monogram" type, because there are very few cases where it works well. I'd rather just use one or two initials, depending on the city. Why does Nashville need "NP"? It reminds me too much of NFL Europa with the RheinFire. A good secondary can combine the one initial with some other imagery related to the nickname. If you have to rely on adding the initial of the nickname, then there's something wrong, because there should enough in the logo for it to relate to the primary without beating you over the head.

The logo here feels a little TOO simple for me. I understand what Andrew said before about the current genre adding a lot of colors, outlines, bevels, bells ans whistles, but I think there could be something else added. Maybe something that refers to Winnipeg itself? Maybe a secondary where the burst from the primary becomes the negative shape of a W?

The uniforms are beautiful, although the numbers look like they sit too high to the shoulders.

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