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What are some of the best baseball cities?


bigbean24

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New York, Boston, St. Louis, Philadelphia immediately come to mind. Though I'm not sure how many youth play the game in the area. Obviously baseball is played more in cities in Florida, California, and other area's where it's warm all year long. I'm not sure that in itself would make those cities "the best baseball towns".

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Boston and New York come to mind (more so Yankees). In Boston there seems to be a Red Sox obsession. Half the people you see in Boston will be wearing something Red Sox. (I would assume the same in New York). Also, if I had to guess I would say that Philly is a great baseball city. Generally the elite teams have the biggest fanbases. (Not to say that they are fairweather fans, there is just more interest)

As for playing baseball, I live in Connecticut, but only about an hour from NY and baseball is very popular. Everyone played baseball when they were a kid. There are even leagues for kids who do not play for their high school.

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Can't speak for other towns, but Atlanta is one of the best baseball cities in terms of overall interest. The Braves don't get a lot of attendance unless it's a big series, but that's just how the culture is down here. EVERYONE cares about the Braves, but only 20,000 people a night feel like dealing with traffic/parking/etc. People make an inaccurate assumption in claiming the Braves have a fairweather following--you can't spend five minutes in Atlanta without seeing a Braves hat on someones head...it's just kind of a weird baseball culture when it comes to attending games...

But, the metro area here is a baseball factory. Cobb County, where I live, is usually pumping out prospects, and Kennesaw State and Georgia Tech are big time baseball schools. Baseball might be more popular than basketball at Kennesaw State

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Can't speak for other towns, but Atlanta is one of the best baseball cities in terms of overall interest. The Braves don't get a lot of attendance unless it's a big series, but that's just how the culture is down here. EVERYONE cares about the Braves, but only 20,000 people a night feel like dealing with traffic/parking/etc. People make an inaccurate assumption in claiming the Braves have a fairweather following--you can't spend five minutes in Atlanta without seeing a Braves hat on someones head...it's just kind of a weird baseball culture when it comes to attending games...

But, the metro area here is a baseball factory. Cobb County, where I live, is usually pumping out prospects, and Kennesaw State and Georgia Tech are big time baseball schools. Baseball might be more popular than basketball at Kennesaw State

I don't know, man. I was at the game in '05, I believe, where they clinched the division title and there was like maybe 15,000 people there. Maybe even less. It may have changed in the last couple years, but to me, Atlanta was a city spoiled by the Braves' success.

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The traffic kills it for a lot of Braves fans that want to go to a game. If you work in downtown Atlanta and you get off work at about 4:00 PM, you gotta drive home (most people that work in Atlanta don't actually live in the city) pick up your family and drive back. Most people don't want to face that traffic more than once a day. You also gotta take into consideration that most Braves fans don't even live in Atlanta. The team from Atlanta has a huge National following thanks to TBS. I live in California now but I would be at Turner Field every day if I still lived there. But the Braves fans are well represented on the road. When they played the Angels this year (the 12-inning game) I was there and part of the crowd doing the tomahawk chop, It was LOUD.

Another fact to consider is that the highest concentration of major league players (from the USA) come from California, Georgia, Florida, and Texas. Georgia has the baseball camp that is like the Juilliard of baseball camps.

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Major League: St. Louis. Consistently referred to as the "Best Baseball Town in America". NYC, Chicago and LA may have two teams, but no one as the combination of respect, knowledge and pure love of the game of baseball like the StL. They cheer when opposing players make great plays, hell they even stood and applauded when the Red Sox won their first World Series in 84 years AT Busch Stadium. Those other cities are too well known for other sports or other things in general than just sports. St. Louis is a through and through, pure baseball city. The Yankees may be the greatest team ever, but St. Louis is the best baseball town.

- Now let the, "I'm sick of St. Louis lovers" comments begin. We've all heard them before.

As far as youth baseball, I honestly don't know. I wouldn't say it's here in Missouri, so I'll defer to make a selection.

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Everyone is going to claim their city is the best...but Cleveland sold out 455 games straight, that pretty much speaks for itself.

I'd say most cities follow their teams pretty well except Toronto, Pittsburgh, and Tampa Bay...

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Consistently referred to as the "Best Baseball Town in America".

And most often by itself.

Does any fanbase get more mileage out of "cheering for the other team's good plays"? Yeah, the manager to whom everyone is so loyal is a paranoid belligerent drunk who has had numerous steroid abusers come and go under his watch, but dadgum it, the fans cheer for the other team's good plays; this is the vector of dignified American sportsmanship. This is a stupid gimmick just like how Philadelphia fans are supposedly primordial swamp creatures (who apparently turn back into normal people and go to work downtown the next morning).

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In Canada, it would be Vancouver and the other cities in the Lower Mainland. When I was there a couple of weeks ago, I was amazed at the number of little league fields around the city. There also seemed to be quite a bit of support for the Canadians eventhough they're only a Short Season league team. Plus the Jays always get good support from the Lower Mainland when they're in Seattle.

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Consistently referred to as the "Best Baseball Town in America".

And most often by itself.

Does any fanbase get more mileage out of "cheering for the other team's good plays"? Yeah, the manager to whome everyone is so loyal is a paranoid belligerent drunk who has had numerous steroid abusers come and go under his watch, but dadgum it, the fans cheer for the other team's good plays; this is the vector of dignified American sportsmanship. This is a stupid gimmick just like how Philadelphia fans are supposedly primordial swamp creatures (who apparently turn back into normal people and go to work downtown the next morning).

Yeah seriously. The fact that not behaving like a goddamn cheerleader is sometimes necessary to get team improvement is seemingly an alien concept in St. Louis.

/Watches La Russa :censored: up a lineup card.

//Nobody else seems to notice or care.

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Although Boston has four teams, which are all pretty good for their respective leagues right now, no Boston fanbase comes close to the Red Sox. While they are very passionite sports fans in general in the Boston area, the love for the other 3 is nowhere near the love that the Red Sox get. Even in the NY area where I live, there's a good amount of Red Sox fans. Patriots, Celtics, Bruins? not so much. Needless to say, the Bronx is also a great baseball city.

How did I forget St. Louis? While I've never been there, all I hear are great things about the fanbase. Also, after going to Wrigley field last month, I realized just how much they love their Cubs. Say what you want about Cub fans, but they are a loyal fanbase.

Among other places that I have been, I would have to say that Anaheim is very far from a great baseball city. You just don't get the same "baseball obsession" type of vibe in Anaheim as you would in Boston, New York, St. Louis, etc.

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Odious "you're the best fans in baseball" ad campaign notwithstanding, St. Louis really is among the best baseball towns in America, though. That's the galling part. I just want 'em to shut up about it once in a while.

I think your elite tier of baseball-mad cities are New York, Boston, St. Louis, Chicago, and Cincinnati. Bay Area might be there too. Los Angeles is waiting to be one again. So is Baltimore. Milwaukee can put itself right there with the top when it wants to. Philadelphia's been one since Ryan Howard but I don't think it's a permanent ascension. Atlanta is a hornet's nest of baseball but nobody can or will drive to Braves games.

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The traffic kills it for a lot of Braves fans that want to go to a game. If you work in downtown Atlanta and you get off work at about 4:00 PM, you gotta drive home (most people that work in Atlanta don't actually live in the city) pick up your family and drive back. Most people don't want to face that traffic more than once a day. You also gotta take into consideration that most Braves fans don't even live in Atlanta. The team from Atlanta has a huge National following thanks to TBS. I live in California now but I would be at Turner Field every day if I still lived there. But the Braves fans are well represented on the road. When they played the Angels this year (the 12-inning game) I was there and part of the crowd doing the tomahawk chop, It was LOUD.

Another fact to consider is that the highest concentration of major league players (from the USA) come from California, Georgia, Florida, and Texas. Georgia has the baseball camp that is like the Juilliard of baseball camps.

100% agree. I think the success spoiled Atlanta fans which would knock it down in the MLB category of your "best baseball town", but if you look at the hometowns of many MLB players you'd be shocked to see how many come from the Atlanta metro. Youth baseball is strong down there. I grew up in Marietta (about 3 blocks from Mabry Middle for those from there) and I think I was playing tee ball before I hit elementary school.

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Everyone is going to claim their city is the best...but Cleveland sold out 455 games straight, that pretty much speaks for itself.

I'd say most cities follow their teams pretty well except Toronto, Pittsburgh, and Tampa Bay...

Yeah, and the Red Sox have sold out more in a row than the Tribe did. And uhh, have you checked out the Indians' attendance this year? It's right there, behind Toronto and Pittsburgh who "don't follow their teams pretty well." As much as I hate to defend Pittsburgh, they're actually drawing people to their games because their good, and selling out PNC, while the Tribe still struggle to get to 30,000. Don't give me the "Cleveland fans are the best because we sold out 455 games when we got a brand new ballpark and had a great team :censored:." We don't support the Tribe anywhere near as much as we should be right now. We're not the best fans in baseball. End of discussion.

I'd also like St. Louis fans to stop blowing themselves. Sure, it's a really good baseball town, but I wish they'd :censored:ing shut the hell up about how great they are. It's part of why a lot of people despise your team.

As far as "best baseball cities" goes, I have a friend who grew up in Atlanta, and from all accounts, the youth baseball in that city is remarkable. So I'd have to put Atlanta at the top of the "baseball cities" list. Second on my list would have to be Boston, as much as I hate to say it. I don't think NYC's a good baseball town either, with that population base, the Yanks should sell out every game.

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Odious "you're the best fans in baseball" ad campaign notwithstanding, St. Louis really is among the best baseball towns in America, though. That's the galling part. I just want 'em to shut up about it once in a while.

I think your elite tier of baseball-mad cities are New York, Boston, St. Louis, Chicago, and Cincinnati. Bay Area might be there too. Los Angeles is waiting to be one again. So is Baltimore. Milwaukee can put itself right there with the top when it wants to. Philadelphia's been one since Ryan Howard but I don't think it's a permanent ascension. Atlanta is a hornet's nest of baseball but nobody can or will drive to Braves games.

The title of the thread is "What are some of the best baseball cities?", so I think it was rather appropriate for me to address the topic. Plus, just google the topic and see how many say the same thing. ESPN once asked all their baseball analysts and Dave Campbell was the only one to NOT say St. Louis (he said Cincinnati because theyvwee the first team). I hate when people say a city is because they have two teams or more championships. That doesn't mean the city is the best, just the team. Yankees are the best team ever but honestly have some some of the worst fans. Philadelphia fans are notorious. I do agree Cubs fans are extremely loyal and some of the best, which is why I would put them near the top, not because Chicago has 2 teams. It's not a question determine by statistics, but rather by personal behavior and actions by the fans and population of the city.

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Both Baltimore and Kansas City are just waiting for a team to support.

PS. Worst baseball towns. Miami and Tampa. Florida doesn't deserve pro baseball.

Agreed. Rays fans couldn't even fill the Trop in 2008 during their World Series run. While there are some loyal Florida fans, baseball has no place in Florida. The Rays (world series berth, 2 divisions in 3 years) and the Marlins (2 WS titles in 7 years) are too good for their fairweather fans.

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