ashbob

Budweiser Gets Packaging Rebrand

Recommended Posts

Budweiser Unveils New "Bowtie" Design

ST. LOUIS (Aug. 3, 2011) – Budweiser, the iconic global beer brand, today revealed a new design, seen in its can and secondary packaging, that will roll out of U.S. breweries and into the hands of American beer drinkers this summer, before debuting in markets around the world later this year.

The new can design is Budweiser's 12th since Anheuser-Busch began offering its flagship brand in cans in 1936. The focal point of the design is Budweiser's iconic bowtie, complemented by the time-honored Budweiser creed and Anheuser-Busch medallion.

"Budweiser's success is rooted in aspects of the beer that will never change – a crisp, refreshing taste, an unwavering commitment to quality and the enormous pride we take in each batch," said Rob McCarthy, vice president, Budweiser. "Our refreshed packaging design gives Budweiser an updated look, which dramatizes the iconic Budweiser bowtie and incorporates the brand hallmarks that loyal Budweiser drinkers will recognize and appreciate."

Budweiser's new "bowtie" can and secondary packaging designs will be the global standard as the brand continues to expand internationally.

"This new visual identity is one of many steps in our quest to reinforce Budweiser's role as a true global beer brand. Together with our unifying global creative idea, the new global packaging look and feel will reinforce Budweiser's bond with consumers around the world," said Frank Abenante, vice president, Brands, AB InBev.

Using the same design principles as the newly designed can, the redesigned secondary packaging will be used for all package configurations and emphasizes the Budweiser creed, which highlights the beer's unique Beechwood Aging process and 135-year long commitment to quality. The packaging will also feature a "Quick Response" (QR) code that will better enable Budweiser to regularly communicate with consumers.

New Design Set

Bud_logo_400.jpg

budweiser_label_red_tab_600.jpg

budweiser_red_tab_top_view_600.jpg

budweiser_bottle_packaging_600.jpg

budweiser_perspective_12_cans_600.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually really like it. It's bright and modern, but maintains the brand's classic imagery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The red pull tab came out with their American flag style cans debuting over Memorial Day. The styling was similar as well, so I guess I am OK with it since I have accepted the cursive years ago.

Rumor was that they went for the red pull tab so that you could recognize a Budweiser if you had a cooler full of other beverages.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of times when companies redesign, they try to do too much. Not in this case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

man this is beautiful! very appropriate and extremely well crafted. you have to love a design team that looks over all the details, including the pull-tab. id like to see the blue in it still, but i dont think anyone will really miss it. and you dont mistake it as CocaCola either. A+

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

man this is beautiful! very appropriate and extremely well crafted. you have to love a design team that looks over all the details, including the pull-tab. id like to see the blue in it still, but i dont think anyone will really miss it. and you dont mistake it as CocaCola either. A+

The only time you will ever see "well crafted" & Budweiser together is when discussing the branding, never about the contents...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's to modern. Maybe I'm mistaken, but I take Budweiser to be the Coca-Cola of American beer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's to modern. Maybe I'm mistaken, but I take Budweiser to be the Coca-Cola of American beer.

Agreed, I don't like it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's to modern. Maybe I'm mistaken, but I take Budweiser to be the Coca-Cola of American beer.

I'd say so, but I'm sure people from Millwaukee will tell you otherwise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's to modern. Maybe I'm mistaken, but I take Budweiser to be the Coca-Cola of American beer.

totally different brand archetypes. both identities reflect them well though. Budweiser is the "average joe", a blue collar American (though they want to be more 'global') every-man. it works hard from 9-5 and drives a truck.

Coke is mostly an "innocent". a happy free spirited optimist.

IMO, i dont think this is too modern for Bud, its just right. and im not sure if you were implying this or not, but its not like Coke isnt a modern identity either. they are the perfect example of modern minimalism

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's to modern. Maybe I'm mistaken, but I take Budweiser to be the Coca-Cola of American beer.

totally different brand archetypes. both identities reflect them well though. Budweiser is the "average joe", a blue collar American (though they want to be more 'global') every-man. it works hard from 9-5 and drives a truck....IMO, i dont think this is too modern for Bud, its just right.

A crown worked into the pull tab seems a little over the top of a beer of the average Joe/hardworking blue collar American.

The red-on-red detail, the emphasis of gold over blue, the after-mentioned pull tab crown, it all seems over the top for a brand that's supposed to appeal to the every man.

and im not sure if you were implying this or not, but its not like Coke isnt a modern identity either. they are the perfect example of modern minimalism

I was implying that Coke's identity isn't modern. You call it "modern minimalism" I call it classic and timeless. Modern minimalism is just another phrase for it.

standard-coca-cola-can.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The "r" gets lost in the white outside of the bowtie. I'd probably have made the bowtie a little bit larger so more of the r was on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A crown worked into the pull tab seems a little over the top of a beer of the average Joe/hardworking blue collar American.

The red-on-red detail, the emphasis of gold over blue, the after-mentioned pull tab crown, it all seems over the top for a brand that's supposed to appeal to the every man.

But Budweiser is branded and marketed as the "King of Beers". That, in my opinion, provides a solid reason for the gold and crown imagery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's to modern. Maybe I'm mistaken, but I take Budweiser to be the Coca-Cola of American beer.

totally different brand archetypes. both identities reflect them well though. Budweiser is the "average joe", a blue collar American (though they want to be more 'global') every-man. it works hard from 9-5 and drives a truck....IMO, i dont think this is too modern for Bud, its just right.

A crown worked into the pull tab seems a little over the top of a beer of the average Joe/hardworking blue collar American.

The red-on-red detail, the emphasis of gold over blue, the after-mentioned pull tab crown, it all seems over the top for a brand that's supposed to appeal to the every man.

and im not sure if you were implying this or not, but its not like Coke isnt a modern identity either. they are the perfect example of modern minimalism

I was implying that Coke's identity isn't modern. You call it "modern minimalism" I call it classic and timeless. Modern minimalism is just another phrase for it.

standard-coca-cola-can.jpg

Coke's packaging and yes even their logo has not always looked like that. its actually a fairly recent upgrade. what has stayed consistent is the colors and for a very long time the logo and "swoosh". they've dropped everything else. thats minimalism. but working with timeless elements

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really like this can. I think it is a great update and I love the red crown pull tab ever since it came out earlier this year. The current 24 oz can is probably my favorite style though, I just love the way it looks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A crown worked into the pull tab seems a little over the top of a beer of the average Joe/hardworking blue collar American.

The red-on-red detail, the emphasis of gold over blue, the after-mentioned pull tab crown, it all seems over the top for a brand that's supposed to appeal to the every man.

But Budweiser is branded and marketed as the "King of Beers". That, in my opinion, provides a solid reason for the gold and crown imagery.

You can either play up the "king of beers" thing or the "average Joe/blue collar" thing. The two don't go well together.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's to modern. Maybe I'm mistaken, but I take Budweiser to be the Coca-Cola of American beer.

totally different brand archetypes. both identities reflect them well though. Budweiser is the "average joe", a blue collar American (though they want to be more 'global') every-man. it works hard from 9-5 and drives a truck....IMO, i dont think this is too modern for Bud, its just right.

A crown worked into the pull tab seems a little over the top of a beer of the average Joe/hardworking blue collar American.

The red-on-red detail, the emphasis of gold over blue, the after-mentioned pull tab crown, it all seems over the top for a brand that's supposed to appeal to the every man.

and im not sure if you were implying this or not, but its not like Coke isnt a modern identity either. they are the perfect example of modern minimalism

I was implying that Coke's identity isn't modern. You call it "modern minimalism" I call it classic and timeless. Modern minimalism is just another phrase for it.

standard-coca-cola-can.jpg

Coke's packaging and yes even their logo has not always looked like that. its actually a fairly recent upgrade. what has stayed consistent is the colors and for a very long time the logo and "swoosh". they've dropped everything else. thats minimalism. but working with timeless elements

I typed up a response to your Coca-Cola claims, but this isn't a Coca-Cola thread. If you want to continue this discussion (which I wouldn't mind at all, having quite an interest in pop history and branding) the PM box is probably the place for it.

As to Budweiser...

Budweiser is a widely known brand with a lot of history behind it. Its packaging should reflect that. I maintain that the red-on-red details, the emphasis on gold, and the crown on the pull tab is both unfitting for a brand trying to appeal to the blue collar/average Joe archetype and for a brand as old and widely known as it is. The previous can (if the cans through the years picture in the original post is any indication, I rarely drink the stuff) seemed more fitting for a traditional blue collar/average Joe brand.

I can't see this guy...

Budweiser is the "average joe", a blue collar American (though they want to be more 'global') every-man. it works hard from 9-5 and drives a truck.

Being reflected in this identity package....

budweiser_label_red_tab_600.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Miller does the "Champagne of Beers" thing, and they also have marketing based on "Our beer's for rugged cowboys because it's from the cold-ass rockies", etc. Is that just as sucky marketing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.