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College Football Uniforms 2011 SEASON


Brave-Bird 08

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From the Birmingham News:

Despite Growing Trend, Auburn Plans To Stick With Its Usual Jerseys

Auburn rejected UA's idea to wear different socks in the BCS Championship Game

While "radical uniforms are the rage in college football" nowadays, it is unlikely Auburn Univ. will "ever wear dramatically different uniforms like its Under Armour counterpart at Maryland," according to Jon Solomon of the BIRMINGHAM NEWS. Solomon notes Auburn "rejected its apparel company's idea to wear different socks at the BCS Championship Game last January." UA Chair, President & CEO Kevin Plank yesterday said, "We had a white sock that had [an] orange strip vertically. It came all the way down to a game-time decision and we found out three hours before kickoff they weren't going to use the sock. So we said, 'Alright, we got ya, we got ya.'" Plank can "never see the Tigers adopting Maryland's approach." He said laughing, "Absolutely not." Plank said it was an "unfortunate incident" that kept the Univ. of South Carolina from wearing its Wounder Warrior Project jerseys against Auburn earlier this month. Solomon notes the uniform numbers "weren't as dramatically different as they needed to be for a day game." Plank said, "We've since made a contribution to the Wounded Warrior Foundation and they were still auctioning some of the jerseys off. The SEC decided they couldn't tell the numbers from the press box." Meanwhile, the company has drawn attention for the unique uniforms the Univ. of Maryland wore in their season opener against the Univ. of Miami. Plank said that he was "disappointed the media focused on Maryland's 32 different uniform combinations at an unveiling this summer, rather than 'how exciting' Maryland looked in the uniforms." He added that Maryland has the "ability to wear different uniform combinations each game, but won't necessarily do so" (BIRMINGHAM NEWS, 10/11).

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See, the problems with Maryland trying "the Oregon approach":

1) Maryland's offense and defense is about as conventional as conventional gets.

2) Aside from the colors and the unique number font, Oregon's uniforms are actually pretty conservative. Maryland's just have too much going on and look cluttered

3) Oregon wins. They'll probably be on their way to a BCS bowl. Maryland will be lucky to even be bowl-eligible.

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See, the problems with Maryland trying "the Oregon approach":

1) Maryland's offense and defense is about as conventional as conventional gets.

2) Aside from the colors and the unique number font, Oregon's uniforms are actually pretty conservative. Maryland's just have too much going on and look cluttered

3) Oregon wins. They'll probably be on their way to a BCS bowl. Maryland will be lucky to even be bowl-eligible.

2 of those have nothing to do with uniform design

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See, the problems with Maryland trying "the Oregon approach":

1) Maryland's offense and defense is about as conventional as conventional gets.

2) Aside from the colors and the unique number font, Oregon's uniforms are actually pretty conservative. Maryland's just have too much going on and look cluttered

3) Oregon wins. They'll probably be on their way to a BCS bowl. Maryland will be lucky to even be bowl-eligible.

2 of those have nothing to do with uniform design

It has to do with "attitude". The decision to go from the Fridge era threads to what they have now was made largely by AD Kevin Anderson, who wanted to infuse the football program with "attitude" and spur people to buy season tickets to football games. So in that regard the circumstances around the uniform change are as relevant as the design of the uniforms themselves.

If Maryland was running with a Mike Leach offense and a 3-3-5 stack defense, those unconventional uniforms would fit better with the unconventional style of play. And of course, public acceptance of a change usually goes over better when the team is winning. It's one thing for fans to think a team looks atrocious when they win, it's another when fans think a team looks atrocious when they lose.

If Edsall finishes something like 4-8, those uniforms will be synonymous with failure and a lack of cohesion between coaches and players instead of synonymous with attitude and excitement.

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See, the problems with Maryland trying "the Oregon approach":

1) Maryland's offense and defense is about as conventional as conventional gets.

2) Aside from the colors and the unique number font, Oregon's uniforms are actually pretty conservative. Maryland's just have too much going on and look cluttered

3) Oregon wins. They'll probably be on their way to a BCS bowl. Maryland will be lucky to even be bowl-eligible.

2 of those have nothing to do with uniform design

It has to do with "attitude". The decision to go from the Fridge era threads to what they have now was made largely by AD Kevin Anderson, who wanted to infuse the football program with "attitude" and spur people to buy season tickets to football games. So in that regard the circumstances around the uniform change are as relevant as the design of the uniforms themselves.

If Maryland was running with a Mike Leach offense and a 3-3-5 stack defense, those unconventional uniforms would fit better with the unconventional style of play. And of course, public acceptance of a change usually goes over better when the team is winning. It's one thing for fans to think a team looks atrocious when they win, it's another when fans think a team looks atrocious when they lose.

If Edsall finishes something like 4-8, those uniforms will be synonymous with failure and a lack of cohesion between coaches and players instead of synonymous with attitude and excitement.

their attitude and brand archetype is one thing. i dont see how you design differently for an Air Raid offense or a Wing T offense. if Oregon was running a West Coast offense, it wouldnt change who they are. perhaps a design is more accepted with a winning school, but i dont see how you design differently for a losing school or a winning one. in both cases, the design should be just be "good". and if any school were to take a chance on a radical design, it would/should be the losing one

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their attitude and brand archetype is one thing. i dont see how you design differently for an Air Raid offense or a Wing T offense. if Oregon was running a West Coast offense, it wouldnt change who they are. perhaps a design is more accepted with a winning school, but i dont see how you design differently for a losing school or a winning one. in both cases, the design should be just be "good". and if any school were to take a chance on a radical design, it would/should be the losing one

But that's the thing; Maryland was by no means a "losing" school the past decade. Yes, they had that awful 2-10 campaign in 2009 but that was when the team had a ton of new faces and a ton of injuries. Ralph Friedgen was a two-time ACC Coach of the Year and won NCAA Coach of the Year in 2003.

The "rebrand" of the football program wasn't meant for any reason but to generate attention - which they did for a little while. Had Maryland not beaten Miami on Labor Day, the conversation would have turned to "what the hell is/was Kevin Anderson thinking?" and I guarantee you the reaction to the "flag pride" threads would have been almost universal disapproval.

The uniform style clashes with Randy Edsall's M.O. as a head coach. Players aren't allowed to wear earrings, jewelry or even baseball caps or backpacks to the Terps practice facility, yet they take the field in "flashy" digs. There is a complete disconnect between the culture of the team (or at least the culture that the coach is trying to instill in the team) and the aesthetic of the uniforms.

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Saw this in the Nike store in Vegas. Thought I'd post just to give you a different look at them maybe

319549_166729703414148_100002313573452_327804_1156505942_n.jpg

Either that photo has some extremely funky lighting, or those uniforms use three different greens and two gold/bronzes. The bright kelly green on the helmet looks especially jarring over the muted forest greens on the jersey.

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their attitude and brand archetype is one thing. i dont see how you design differently for an Air Raid offense or a Wing T offense. if Oregon was running a West Coast offense, it wouldnt change who they are. perhaps a design is more accepted with a winning school, but i dont see how you design differently for a losing school or a winning one. in both cases, the design should be just be "good". and if any school were to take a chance on a radical design, it would/should be the losing one

But that's the thing; Maryland was by no means a "losing" school the past decade. Yes, they had that awful 2-10 campaign in 2009 but that was when the team had a ton of new faces and a ton of injuries. Ralph Friedgen was a two-time ACC Coach of the Year and won NCAA Coach of the Year in 2003.

The "rebrand" of the football program wasn't meant for any reason but to generate attention - which they did for a little while. Had Maryland not beaten Miami on Labor Day, the conversation would have turned to "what the hell is/was Kevin Anderson thinking?" and I guarantee you the reaction to the "flag pride" threads would have been almost universal disapproval.

The uniform style clashes with Randy Edsall's M.O. as a head coach. Players aren't allowed to wear earrings, jewelry or even baseball caps or backpacks to the Terps practice facility, yet they take the field in "flashy" digs. There is a complete disconnect between the culture of the team (or at least the culture that the coach is trying to instill in the team) and the aesthetic of the uniforms.

i agree about Maryland's football program. and the reason for the re-brand. in this case its UA treating their home team like Nike does theirs. but failing to see why it all works for Oregon. with UA and Maryland its a clash of culture. culture is something you can design for. what i was getting at is it dosent matter about what system they run. Oregon could still run a fast paced no huddle check-with-me system and still retain their attitude and culture if that system was spread-option, west coast, air raid, wing-t, etc. its not WHAT you run but HOW you run it.

i apologize if i misread your "conventional style of play" statement as a take on play system as opposed to their culture and approach to football.

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Saw this in the Nike store in Vegas. Thought I'd post just to give you a different look at them maybe

319549_166729703414148_100002313573452_327804_1156505942_n.jpg

See, this doesn't look that bad. If they paired this with a pair green or bronze pants, it'd be acceptable IMO. But the plain black pants kill it for me.

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