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Say it ain't so, Joe


Viper
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I was giving Joe Pa the benefit of the doubt, I liked Joe Paterno, but I was fooled by the ditehering old man. He was a snake a cold hearted snake.

A lot of people were Tank. I never followed NCAA football until relatively recently and yet I knew who Joe Paterno was. I never looked up to him like a kind of creepy surrogate grandfather like a lot of people did, but I assumed his reputation was based in truth, and I had no reason to question it. Until this story broke.

A lot of people were taken in by a carefully crafted public image. It happens. The real test of character comes afterwards. After the truth's been revealed, do you have the emotional maturity to recognize what you were always told was based on lies? Can you cast aside the cult of personality you bought into and recognize the man, Joe Paterno, for what he was? An enabler, a coward, and a sad excuse for a human being. Can you recognize not just the Penn State football program, but the University's administration in general, for what it is? A group of like-minded enablers and cowards?

Some people can't. Even after all that's happened, they still worship the self-absorbed rape enabler known as Joe Paterno and his football program. The real disgusting part of it, to me anyway, is that a lot of these apologists try to use the victims to their advantage. They say "can't you just let it all go so the victims can have closure?" It's disgusting. They don't care about the victims. They never did. They just can't stand to hear anymore means things about the man they adopted as their surrogate granddad.

Let the Penn State community (those that still buy into this nonsense) exist in their own closed off bubble for all I care. They'll be doing the rest of us a favour.

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That report is appalling, really. There's no other way to see it. JoPa did some awful things and the whole Penn State athletic department needs a break to first off send a message, but second off to reevaluate their priorities.

I will say this though, what came out doesn't surprise me at all. I'm not defending JoPa in any way on this, but the guy built his life around that program and from what I read, he was worried about having what he built crumble around him, so he took a terrible situation and made it worse tenfold. This doesn't excuse him at all (and shouldn't), but it seems to me like his life was built around Penn State so heavily that he took the mindset that nothing was going to ruin that for him as long as he could control it. It's a seriously sick, twisted, and selfish point of view. It just goes to show that you need to keep a proper perspective on things, because if you lose that, you can justify some pretty abhorrent things in your own head.

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Just take away the TV money and revenue sharing for 5 years. Money is why this happened. Football was just the most convenient instrument with which to funnel money to the university and various soon-to-be incarcerated or already dead people.

Of course making it about the money might be unpalatable to many because if this whole thing happened because of money, suddenly "It could never happen here" moral outrage becomes less viable for a whole lot of people. <_<

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It's amazing to think that all this could have been avoided with one simple act. If Paterno had simply picked up the phone and called the police the first time McQueary told him what happened, he would have died with his legacy intact and he would have been lauded as a hero for both making Penn State a great program and for helping to bring a sexual predator to justice.

Just one phone call. That's it.

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As Dexter Morgan alluded to, money and football are inextricably tied here. When I say "football is why this happened," I of course mean the financial aspects of the program, not running plays.

But they don't have to be. And that's why I like going after the money more. If we say it happened because of football, it allows all of the Nancy Graces of the world to go back to their day-to-day lives looking out for number one because by golly we aren't involved in a major football program so this would never happen to us. If we make it explicit that it happened because of money and the pursuit of "look out for number one"...well maybe the Nancy Graces need to consider some change in priorities and values too. And maybe that way we will get a punishment that does what it is supposed to do. Deter everyone else from doing what the Penn State administration did.

Downside is that this once again calls into question the fundamental beliefs of American society, but maybe that isn't a downside.

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It's amazing to think that all this could have been avoided with one simple act. If Paterno had simply picked up the phone and called the police the first time McQueary told him what happened, he would have died with his legacy intact and he would have been lauded as a hero for both making Penn State a great program and for helping to bring a sexual predator to justice.

Just one phone call. That's it.

Yep.

But he made the wrong choice, and then made that same wrong choice again every day for the next four thousand days. At any point, he could have called the police. At any point, he could have stopped the abuse.

What a sick, sick bastard.

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But they don't have to be. And that's why I like going after the money more. If we say it happened because of football, it allows all of the Nancy Graces of the world to go back to their day-to-day lives looking out for number one because by golly we aren't involved in a major football program so this would never happen to us. If we make it explicit that it happened because of money and the pursuit of "look out for number one"...well maybe the Nancy Graces need to consider some change in priorities and values too. And maybe that way we will get a punishment that does what it is supposed to do. Deter everyone else from doing what the Penn State administration did.

But how does suspending the football program, and with it all the money they would get from it, not deter others? I think you and I want the same end result--a financial crippling of the institution to serve as a head on a stick for everyone else--we're just quibbling over what the best way is to sever the head. Football made a lot of money for the school (and Joe Paterno). If football isn't there for a while, those revenue streams are gone. I think this has to get the worst punishment a program has ever gotten because this is the worst thing a program has ever done. I'm fine with bowl bans and suspended revenue sharing for years after an altogether lost year, but after all we've learned, there has to not be Penn State football for a while.

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Without their football program Penn State as a whole would be in deep trouble. It's what keeps the engine running.

Just curious what this means.

Football made a lot of money for the school (and Joe Paterno). If football isn't there for a while, those revenue streams are gone.

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Trivia who is the only school to win both the NCAA and NIT in the same season?

Answer 1950 CCNY

Why haven't they been to a tournament since

Because the entire sports prpgram was shutdown for fixing games. Its been done before.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CCNY_point_shaving_scandal

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BEAVERTON, Ore. -- The president of Nike Inc. says he has decided to change the name of the Joe Paterno Child Development Center, a child care facility at the company's headquarters.

CEO Mark Parker said Thursday he was deeply saddened by the news coming out of the Louis Freeh investigation on the child sex abuse scandal at Penn State.

In his report released earlier Thursday, Freeh said Paterno and other top school officials disregarded the welfare of Jerry Sandusky's victims as they failed to report abuse allegations against the longtime Penn State assistant coach.

"It is a terrible tragedy that children were unprotected from such abhorrent crimes," Parker said.

Nike founder Phil Knight, who defended Paterno at the coach's memorial service in January, also issued a statement.

"Throughout Joe Paterno's career, he strived to put young athletes in a position to succeed and win in sport but most importantly in life," Knight said. "Joe influenced thousands of young men to become better leaders, fathers and husbands.

"According to the investigation, it appears Joe made missteps that led to heartbreaking consequences. I missed that Joe missed it, and I am extremely saddened on this day. My love for Joe and his family remains."

http://espn.go.com/college-football/story/_/id/8160568/nike-takes-joe-paterno-name-child-care-center-company-headquarters

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But they don't have to be. And that's why I like going after the money more. If we say it happened because of football, it allows all of the Nancy Graces of the world to go back to their day-to-day lives looking out for number one because by golly we aren't involved in a major football program so this would never happen to us. If we make it explicit that it happened because of money and the pursuit of "look out for number one"...well maybe the Nancy Graces need to consider some change in priorities and values too. And maybe that way we will get a punishment that does what it is supposed to do. Deter everyone else from doing what the Penn State administration did.

But how does suspending the football program, and with it all the money they would get from it, not deter others? I think you and I want the same end result--a financial crippling of the institution to serve as a head on a stick for everyone else--we're just quibbling over what the best way is to sever the head. Football made a lot of money for the school (and Joe Paterno). If football isn't there for a while, those revenue streams are gone. I think this has to get the worst punishment a program has ever gotten because this is the worst thing a program has ever done. I'm fine with bowl bans and suspended revenue sharing for years after an altogether lost year, but after all we've learned, there has to not be Penn State football for a while.

Because football can be too easily compartmentalized and ignored in the eye of the general public. It's just something those crazy hilljacks in the South and a couple less civilized folks in the Midwest excessively care about, but the risk of such ethical compromises in the name of millions of dollars is confined to those communities. It could never happen to the rest of us.

*Reads about next ethical compromise in the name of millions of dollars by some other (former) community pillar in another industry in a another part of the country a couple of months later*

*"How horrible! But it could never happen here!"*

*Repetere ad infinitum*

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