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Bizarre/Unusual Numbers on Jerseys

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That particular rule about

00 really isn't all that uncommon of a number in baseball or basketball. In fact it's practically ubiquitous at the high school and college levels of basketball due to schools being discouraged (or even forbidden, the the case of the NCAA) from issuing any jerseys that feature an individual number higher than 5 (i.e. 10 or 53 is allowed, but not 17 or 46).

0 or 00 in baseball wasn't common until about 2 or 3 seasons ago, when Adam Ottavino switched his number

@illwauk: That rule regarding individual numbers higher than 5 being banned that you mentioned sounds like the most arbitrary and silliest rules out there.
Numbers -6--9 aren't used for refereeing purposes... So they say.

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That particular rule about

00 really isn't all that uncommon of a number in baseball or basketball. In fact it's practically ubiquitous at the high school and college levels of basketball due to schools being discouraged (or even forbidden, the the case of the NCAA) from issuing any jerseys that feature an individual number higher than 5 (i.e. 10 or 53 is allowed, but not 17 or 46).

0 or 00 in baseball wasn't common until about 2 or 3 seasons ago, when Adam Ottavino switched his number

@illwauk: That rule regarding individual numbers higher than 5 being banned that you mentioned sounds like the most arbitrary and silliest rules out there.

Until you consider that the only way a ref can signal a player number is with his hands. The rule makes it so he only has to use his hands once to display any number, Any thing over a 5 would require two hands per digit.

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That particular rule about

00 really isn't all that uncommon of a number in baseball or basketball. In fact it's practically ubiquitous at the high school and college levels of basketball due to schools being discouraged (or even forbidden, the the case of the NCAA) from issuing any jerseys that feature an individual number higher than 5 (i.e. 10 or 53 is allowed, but not 17 or 46).

0 or 00 in baseball wasn't common until about 2 or 3 seasons ago, when Adam Ottavino switched his number

@illwauk: That rule regarding individual numbers higher than 5 being banned that you mentioned sounds like the most arbitrary and silliest rules out there.

Until you consider that the only way a ref can signal a player number is with his hands. The rule makes it so he only has to use his hands once to display any number, Any thing over a 5 would require two hands per digit.

Now I getcha.

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On 10/3/2015 at 9:14 AM, FGM13 said:

Another strange number. Since his return from injury this year, Marcus Stroman of the Blue Jays has been wearing number 6, so add him to the list of Jays pitchers in the past few years with single digits (Towers-7, Drabek-4).

I know this was brought up earlier in this thread about single digit pitchers.

 

I know Rob Bell, Josh Towers, and Mike Leake (on the Cards last year) wore a single digit on their backs.  Then I found this list from 2005.

 

ONE-DIGIT WONDERS

Since major-league baseball teams regularly began wearing uniform numbers in 1929, only around 100 pitchers have donned single digits. Here's a list:

1930s

Year, Pitcher, Team, Number 
1931 Bob Weiland, Chicago White Sox, 2 
1932 Ed Gallagher, Boston Red Sox, 1 
1932 Johnny Welch, Boston Red Sox, 6 
1932 Pete Daglia, Chicago White Sox, 9 
1933 Mike Meola, Boston Red Sox, 3 
1933 Frank Ragland, Philadelphia Phillies, 4 
1933 Bots Nekola, Detroit Tigers, 8 (played in only two games during the season) 
1935 Woody Upchurch, Philadelphia Athletics, 9 (three games) 
1935 Harry Gumbert, New York Giants, 1 (rookie, six games) 
1935-36 George Earnshaw, Brooklyn Dodgers, 7 
1936 Bob Feller, Cleveland Indians 9  (rookie season only) 
1936 Fred Archer, Philadelphia Athletics 3 (six games) 
1936 Roy Weir, Boston Bees, 9 
1937 Chubby Dean, Philadelphia Athletics, 3 (two games) 
1937 Bill Trotter, St. Louis Browns, 9 
1938 Bill Lefebvre, Boston Red Sox, 1 
1938 Gene Ford, Chicago White Sox, 6 (four games) 
1939  Ewald "Lefty" Pyle, St. Louis Browns, 9 
1939 Eddie Smith, Chicago White Sox, 6 
1939 Max Butcher, Philadelphia Phillies, 8 
1939 Al Hollingsworth, Philadelphia Phillies, 7 
1939-40 Syl Johnson, Philadelphia Phillies, 3 
1939-40 Hugh Mulcahy, Philadelphia Phillies, 9 
1939 Ike Pearson, Philadelphia Phillies, 5

1940s

1940 Cy Blanton, Philadelphia Phillies 6 and 7 
1940 Lefty Hoerst, Philadelphia Phillies, 8 (six games, two numbers) 
1940 Red Anderson, Washington Senators, 3 (two games) 
1940 Ace Williams, Boston Bees, 5 (five games, changed numbers during season) 
1940 Ernie White, St. Louis Cardinals, 2 (rookie, changed numbers) 
1941 Bill Crouch, Philadelphia Phillies, 6 
1941-42 Gene Lambert, Philadelphia Phillies, 9 (two games, one game) 
1941 Rube Melton, Philadelphia Phillies, 8 (rookie) 
1941 Johnny Hutchings, Boston Braves, 5 (changed numbers) 
1941 Walt Lanfranconi, Chicago Cubs, 3, (two games) 
1941 Wimpy Quinn, Chicago Cubs, 4 (three games, three numbers) 
1942 Andy Lapihuska, Philadelphia Phillies, 6 (three games) 
1942 Si Johnson, Philadelphia Phillies, 8 (changed numbers) 
1942 Paul Masterson, Philadelphia Phillies, 8 (four games) 
1942-43 Bobo Newsome, Brooklyn Dodgers, 8 
1942 Schoolboy Rowe, Brooklyn Dodgers 8 
1942-43 Pete Center, Cleveland Indians, 7 (one game in 1942) 
1943 Lou Ciola, Philadelphia Athletics, 7 
1943 Al Gerheauser, Philadelphia Phillies, 6 
1943 Andy Karl, Philadelphia Phillies, 6 (nine games) 
1943 Bill Voiselle, New York Giants, 5 (four games) 
1943-45 Xavier Rescigno, Pittsburgh Pirates, 4 
1944 Stan Partenheimer, Boston Red Sox, 6 (one game) 
1944 John McGillen, Philadelphia Athletics, 3 (two games) 
1944  Chief Hogsett, Detroit Tigers, 2 (three games) 
1944 Jake Mooty, Detroit Tigers, 5 
1944-45 Ben Chapman, Brooklyn Dodgers, 5 
1944 Art Herring, Brooklyn Dodgers, 3 (changed numbers) 
1945 Billy Pierce, Detroit Tigers, 5  (rookie, five games, changed numbers from Hank Greenberg's number; Greenberg in military)  
1945 Charlie Gassaway, Philadelphia Athletics, 3 
1945 Lefty Wallace, Boston Braves, 9 (five games, changed numbers) 
1946 Art Houtteman, Detroit Tigers, 6 (one game) 
1946 Bob Lemon, Cleveland Indians, 6 (rookie season only) 
1946 Johnny Hutchings, Boston Braves, 5 
1946 Ralph Hamner, Chicago White Sox, 8 (rookie) 
1946 Ben Chapman, Philadelphia Phillies, 7 (one game) 
1946 Charlie Ripple, Philadelphia Phillies 8 (six games) 
1946 Hal Schumacher, New York Giants, 9 (changed numbers) 
1947 Cal Dorsett, Cleveland Indians, 9, (two games) 
1947 Lyman Linde, Cleveland Indians, 3, (one game) 
1947 Hal Gregg, Brooklyn Dodgers, 8 (changed numbers) 
1947 Al Lyons, Pittsburgh Pirates, 2 
1948 Tony Jacobs, Chicago Cubs, 2 (one game) 
1948 Jocko Thompson, Philadelphia Phillies, 9 (two games)

1950s

1950 Erv Dusak, St. Louis Cardinals, 7 
1950 Ray Scarborough, Chicago White Sox, 7 
1950 Murray Wall, Boston Braves, 6 (one game) 
1952 Mike Fornieles, Washington Senators, 4 (four games) 
1952 Raul Sanchez, Washington Senators, 5 (three games, changed numbers) 
1953 Al Aber, Detroit Tigers, 2 
1955 Glenn Cox, Kansas City Athletics, 8 (two games) 
1955 Saul Rogovin, Philadelphia Phillies, 9 
1955 Tony Jacobs, St. Louis Cardinals, 1 (one game) 
1956 George Brunet, Kansas City Athletics, 9 (rookie, six games, changed numbers) 
1956 Bud Byerly, Washington Senators, 8 
1957 Johnny Gray, Cleveland Indians, 6 (seven games) 
1957 Stover McIlwain, Chicago White Sox, 6 (one game) 
1957 Johnny O'Brien, Pittsburgh Pirates, 6 
1958 Hal Trosky, Chicago White Sox, 3 (two games) 
1958 Walt Craddock, Kansas City Athletics, 6 (changed numbers) 
1958 John Anderson, Philadelphia Phillies, 3 (five games)

1960s

1960 Eddie Fisher, San Francisco Giants, 7 (three games) 
1962 Bob Priddy, Pittsburgh Pirates, 8 (rookie, two games) 
1962 Jack Jenkins, Washington Senators, 1 (three games) 
1963 Bob Baird, Washington Senators, 8 (five games) 
1968 Bill Monbouquette, San Francisco Giants, 8 (seven games, changed numbers)

1970s

1970 Dooley Womack, Oakland Athletics, 3 (two games, changed numbers) 
1973 Horacio Pina, Oakland Athletics, 7 (changed numbers)

1980s

1985 Atlee Hammaker, San Francisco Giants, 7

1990s

1990 Matt Young, Seattle Mariners, 1 
1997 Jeff Juden, Cleveland Indians, 7 
1999 Dan Carlson, Arizona Diamondbacks, 3 (two games)

2000s

2001 Rob Bell, Texas Rangers, 6 
2001 Wayne Gomes, San Francisco Giants, 2 
2003-05 Josh Towers, Toronto Blue Jays, 7 
2005 David Wells, Boston Red Sox, 3

***

Pitchers who have worn 00

1943, 46-47 Bobo Newsome, Washington Nationals, 00 
1954 Joe Page Pittsburgh Pirates 00 (seven games) 
1993 Omar Olivares, St. Louis Cardinals, 00 
1995 Omar Olivares, Philadelphia Phillies, 00 (five games) 
2001 Curtis Leskanic, Milwaukee Brewers, 00 
2004 Rick White, Cleveland Indians, 00 
2005 Rick White, Pittsburgh Pirates, 00

 

 

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The biggest number worn in the history of the German Bundesliga - #77 by Andreas Görlitz for Karlsruher SC in 2007/08:

 

1099432_imgw750.jpg

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Italian fotball club Chievo have given their new signing Jonathan de Guzman - a central midfielder - the No.1 shirt virtually always worn by goalkeepers: http://www.espnfc.co.uk/blog/the-toe-poke/65/post/2942637/jonathan-de-guzman-to-wear-no-1-at-chievo

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http://media.gettyimages.com/photos/aurelien-collin-of-new-york-red-bulls-knocks-down-cyle-larin-of-city-picture-id528684258

As for the highest uniform number in MLS? That goes to Aurelien Collin, lately of Red Bull New York, with #78.

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^ Oh, I didn't notice that. Silly me for relying on outdated information! XD

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The poster boy for this thread will always be Benito Santiago wearing #09 in Florida. Does anyone else know of other players who wore two-digit numbers where the first was a zero and the second was not?

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Dodger Julio Urias is one of those rare pitchers that wears...

image.jpeg

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On 9/4/2016 at 2:00 PM, SCalderwood said:

In case it hasn't been mentioned yet, Aaron Judge of the Yankees wears #99.

 

260px-Aaron_Judge_on_August_16,_2016.jpg

I believe he's trying to start a new Yankee trend to retire all the nineties in descending order since all the single digit numbers are done with (except #0. What's with that? Is no one allowed to use #0 in baseball or in the Yankee clubhouse? I realize the NFL has banned the use but in baseball?)

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3 hours ago, Ben in LA said:

Dodger Julio Urias is one of those rare pitchers that wears...

image.jpeg

There seem to be a few more pitchers doing this recently.

 

Marcus Stroman...

image.jpeg

 

Blake Snell...

image.jpeg

 

Adam Ottavino...

image.jpeg

 

And Mike Leake

image.jpeg

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This may have been posted already... (I'm just too lazy to look).

 

Ron Artest when he wore #96 after learning that the NBA outlaws #69...

artest-rockets1.jpg

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45 minutes ago, ltjets21 said:

Is that true?^^^

 

When the NBA rejected Rodman's request to be #69, he then requested #70. The NBA approved it and he wore 70 for his short stint with the Mavs.

 

Wouldn't shock me if Stern said no twice. 

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On 9/4/2016 at 11:00 AM, SCalderwood said:

In case it hasn't been mentioned yet, Aaron Judge of the Yankees wears #99.

 

260px-Aaron_Judge_on_August_16,_2016.jpg

 

Unless he's a pitcher and his nickname is "Wild Thing", it just doesn't look right.  I know the Yankees have a lot of numbers retired, but I don't think any baseball player should wear numbers in the 70s, 80s, or 90s until they actually run out of numbers.

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