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Bizarre/Unusual Numbers on Jerseys


kloo
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73 seems to be a popular number this season in the NHL. 2 rookies were wearing it (Gallagher and Toffoli) along with Micheal Ryder and Guliamme Lautendresse. First time that number has been worn more than once in a season except '07 (Pavel Kubina wore it as well as Ryder).

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A few years ago I started a thread about non-whole numbers after I saw defensman Dave Reid wearing 95.5 with EHC Munich:

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This was done because one of the team's sponsors is Munich radio station Radio Charivari 95.5. There was a player in England who pulled a similar stunt back in the 1980s.

If you check the thread linked we already discussed it. I was just pulling it up again for this thread.

Hawaiian native Pisa Tinoisamoa wore number 50 when he was with the Rams (Hawaii Five O)

38m.jpg

Or the 50th state

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Hawaiian native Pisa Tinoisamoa wore number 50 when he was with the Rams (Hawaii Five O)

38m.jpg

The Mets had 2 different Hawaii natives do the same thing: Sid Fernandez and Benny Agbayani

Fellow Hawaiian Shane Victorino does the same thing when playing for team USA.

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The Japanese catcher with the three-digit number got me thinking - how long will it be until 3 digit numbers are used in American sports?

Clearly we're used to seeing 1 or 2 digits because that's how it's been essentially since uniform numbers were introduced, but 3 digits (especially when the first digit is a 1) don't look cluttered at all.

I'm thinking the first instance of 3 digit numbers will be in college football - with the large rosters and already some cases of duplicate numbers, somebody's got to do it eventually.

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First off: holy crap, a VandyDelphiaMike sighitng! :shocked:

Second...I'll bite and call it: the second the NCAA or any of the leagues allows triple digits, the following will happen:

  • Players will try to wear their area codes
  • Two NYers from the same borough and on the same team will duel to the death for their code (with table legs, Metta Artest style, naturally)
  • A closer will don 911
  • A Gretzky wannabe will wear 999
  • Some lineman will add up his bench and squat maxes for his number
  • Bill Lee will make a one-game comeback so he can wear 337.
  • Those who can't get their area codes will try to wear their birthdays
  • a particularly religious Johnson will ask for 316
  • Finally, Miroslav Satan will be issued 666. Infuriated, he will defect to Cuba. :D

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NHL Goalie numbers

317626_display_image.jpg?1302198511

Darren Puppa

dm_130131_nhl_penguins_rangers_highlight.jpg

Tomas Vokoun

56485060.jpg?v=1&c=IWSAsset&k=2&d=77BFBA49EF878921F7C3FC3F69D929FD8671DDFE1CAB6E7A102B6C08DA9E9F091742C9BED056B3C3

Nikolai Khabibulin

hextall.jpg

Ron Hextall

I think Hextall wore #27 when he was with the Flyers, so he flipped his number when he got to Long Island. Thirty years ago, Carlton Fisk, #27 with the Red Sox, switched to #72 when he signed with the White Sox.

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Hawaiian native Pisa Tinoisamoa wore number 50 when he was with the Rams (Hawaii Five O)

38m.jpg

The Mets had 2 different Hawaii natives do the same thing: Sid Fernandez and Benny Agbayani

I beleive the reason Bernie Williams wore 51 was for Puerto Rico (the "51st state")

alg-bernie-jpg.jpg

But this thread took a wrong turn somewhere and has gone from unusual numbers to "why players chose those numbers"

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Carlton Fisk had worn 27 for the Red Sox, but reversed the digits when he got to the White Sox. It made for an unusual number for a baseball player, especially a Hall Of Fame catcher.

carlton-fisk-chicago-white-sox-action-autographed-photograph-3392786.jpg

His daughter was also born in '72, I believe, so it worked out well.

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NHL Goalie numbers

317626_display_image.jpg?1302198511

Darren Puppa

dm_130131_nhl_penguins_rangers_highlight.jpg

Tomas Vokoun

56485060.jpg?v=1&c=IWSAsset&k=2&d=77BFBA49EF878921F7C3FC3F69D929FD8671DDFE1CAB6E7A102B6C08DA9E9F091742C9BED056B3C3

Nikolai Khabibulin

hextall.jpg

Ron Hextall

I think Hextall wore #27 when he was with the Flyers, so he flipped his number when he got to Long Island. Thirty years ago, Carlton Fisk, #27 with the Red Sox, switched to #72 when he signed with the White Sox.

He wore 27 while he played a season in Quebec as part of the Lindros deal then was shipped to Long Island:

72495468_crop_650x440.jpg?1312303765

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  • 4 weeks later...

The only way that could happen in the NFL right now is something like this: A college QB is drafted but his team decides to turn him into a running back in pre-season, so he gets assigned a number in the 20s. Then due to an emergency situation, the team has to put him in at QB and decides to keep him there. He's now grandfathered in with his running back number and could keep it if he wants.

Similarly, if Tim Tebow goes to a team that decides to put him at fullback or tight end, he can continue to wear 15 because he's grandfathered in. (Same has how Devin Hester still wears No. 23 even though he's a full-time WR now.)

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The only way that could happen in the NFL right now is something like this: A college QB is drafted but his team decides to turn him into a running back in pre-season, so he gets assigned a number in the 20s. Then due to an emergency situation, the team has to put him in at QB and decides to keep him there. He's now grandfathered in with his running back number and could keep it if he wants.

Similarly, if Tim Tebow goes to a team that decides to put him at fullback or tight end, he can continue to wear 15 because he's grandfathered in. (Same has how Devin Hester still wears No. 23 even though he's a full-time WR now.)

I could see this happening to Denard Robinson.

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I never thought a QB wearing a number in the 20s was unusual at all. I think its pretty dope and I hope that finds its way to the pros.

Doug Flutie wore #20 with the Calgary Stampeders in the CFL

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I have to say that players, especially goalies (hockey), wearing non-traditional numbers drives me crazy. Most of the younger players are choosing "training camp" jersey numbers these days. Small gripe, I know, but I think it looks stupid to see goalies outside of numbers 1 and 30-39.

Ken Dryden wore 29 and Gilles Meloche wore #27.

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Back in the 60s in international competition and European club hockey you'd see a more rigid numbering pattern kind of like NFL rules.

For example, the starting goalie would get 1, then defenseman got lower numbers before the forwards got a shot at choosing. Different nations had different rules one what number the backup goalie wore like Canada and 21, the USSR and 20, Czechoslovakia and 2 while East Germany used 16 and 17 for the starter and backup.

Point being 1 is the true traditional goalie number but there has hardly be a set standard before. Here's a nice little link with an explanation of how numbers in the 30s became "safe" for goalies.

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andrew_desjardins_2011_03_17.jpg

Weird number aside, you would think this would be someone being funny picking #69 but the Sharks have a tradition on not letting their rookies pick numbers. They just take the numbers assigned to them in training camp, which is why they have lots of guys in the 60s over the last few years. Their AHL team is fairly similar but on the 1-20somethign side.

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