Sign in to follow this  
48lowes

AHL Rumor: Whale turns back into wolfpack

Recommended Posts

Its unoffical because the AHL has not announce it but looks like we got the wolfpack comeing back to the AHL, any thoughts on if its better than whale logo or not?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Whale was a stupid halfway measure, with a mediocre logo to boot.

Not that Wolf Pack is a whole lot better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Talk here is that the Wolfpack is back....and I'm from CT.

Both logos suck honestly. Wolf wins, only because it might suck just a little less...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't think either of the two identities were particularly bad, but the half-assed way in which the team switches identities is a joke and cannot be doing anything for their credibility as a franchise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If they'd have just added a friggen "rs" to the end of Connecticut Whale, they'd have had the perfect name and identity for what they were trying to do.

Now they've gone from a generic name, to a stupid name, and back to a generic name.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If they'd have just added a friggen "rs" to the end of Connecticut Whale, they'd have had the perfect name and identity for what they were trying to do.

Now they've gone from a generic name, to a stupid name, and back to a generic name.

Ehh...Wolfpack works well for Connecticut when you consider how big a role the state plays in our current submarine basing and construction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If they'd have just added a friggen "rs" to the end of Connecticut Whale, they'd have had the perfect name and identity for what they were trying to do.

Now they've gone from a generic name, to a stupid name, and back to a generic name.

Ehh...Wolfpack works well for Connecticut when you consider how big a role the state plays in our current submarine basing and construction.

Interesting. Thought it wouldn't hurt for them to actually work some naval imagery into their identity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You mean, other than the huge submarine in the logo?

It's not a terrible name, even if it was coined by the Nazis. I still associate them with the tactic far more than the US Navy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd never seen the logo on the right until now.

Hartford-Wolfpack.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, that's the one that seems to be all over MSG's coverage, or at least used to be. I recalled it as being the primary, which it obviously wasn't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Am I the only one who didn't hate the Connecticut Whale identity?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If they'd have just added a friggen "rs" to the end of Connecticut Whale, they'd have had the perfect name and identity for what they were trying to do.

Now they've gone from a generic name, to a stupid name, and back to a generic name.

I don't think the NHL would let Baldwin use "Whalers," as they now seem to have taken over the Whalers' IP, which had belonged to the state of Connecticut.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's my understanding as well. The NHL makes money hand over fist selling Whalers merchandise (as recently as last season the Whalers were outselling all but four current NHL teams!), and they aren't going to let some minor-league club put the smallest dent in that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd never seen the logo on the right until now.

Hartford-Wolfpack.jpg

Left logo was the primary. Right logo was the shoulder patch.

There may have been another logo with a wolf head in it used as a third, but I can't remember for sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's my understanding as well. The NHL makes money hand over fist selling Whalers merchandise (as recently as last season the Whalers were outselling all but four current NHL teams!), and they aren't going to let some minor-league club put the smallest dent in that.

What this really illustrates is that the only real solution to this Hartford thing is an NHL team. Southern New England has gone through its "don't know what you got till it's gone" phase, and seems just as unwilling to support a minor-league facsimile as they are a Rangers affiliate. I doubt they'll ever get that team, but the AHL is never going to be much more than submediocre (and Sub, Mediocre aptly describes that secondary) in Hartford. If they really marketed the Whalers as the kitschy, weird team for people wanting some alternative not only to the Bruins but to everything, you could have something interesting there, certainly more interesting that whatever is trudging along in the old Whale's new home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's my understanding as well. The NHL makes money hand over fist selling Whalers merchandise (as recently as last season the Whalers were outselling all but four current NHL teams!), and they aren't going to let some minor-league club put the smallest dent in that.

What this really illustrates is that the only real solution to this Hartford thing is an NHL team.

The notion that the sales figures for Hartford Whalers souvenir merchandise somehow clinch the argument for returning an NHL franchise to Connecticut's capital city is, quite frankly, ludicrous.

Nostalgia is wonderful. So is quality graphic design. That the two have combined to fuel astronomical sales of licensed products bearing the Hartford Whalers logo is a boon to the NHL's merchandising bottom-line... and NOTHING more.

First of all, how much of the Hartford Whalers product we're talking about is being sold to customers well outside Hartford Metropolitan Area and the State of Connecticut? I'd be willing to wager that a significant percentage of it is being purchased by people living nowhere near the Hartford and/or Connecticut markets. A great deal of it is being sold to folks outside the markets who simply like the logo. Meaning that just because someone opts to buy merchandise adorned with the Whalers logo, that doesn't mean said consumer is also a legitimate potential customer for tickets to a new Hartford-based NHL franchise. Teams like the Toledo Mud Hens, Charleston RiverDogs, and Albuquerque Isotopes move a lot of MiLB merchandise, most of it to consumers outside their local markets. That doesn't mean Major League Baseball is going to be setting-up shop in any of those cities.

Second, even those Hartford and Connecticut-based consumers who purchase Whalers souvenir merchandise aren't necessarily realistic potential customers for tickets to a new Hartford-based NHL franchise. Simply because someone is willing to spend the money to buy a cap, t-shirt, or even an authentic jersey bearing the Whalers logo, doesn't mean that they possess the financial wherewithal to purchase NHL game tickets. There's a big difference between spending $20.00 for a cap and dropping $60.00 on a game ticket... between buying a $200.00 jersey and plunking down upwards of $80.00 a game 40 times a year as part of a season-ticket package.

Third, and most importantly, Hartford is a textbook example of a marginally successful small market on the major-pro sports level. Given that Hartford, as a market, is going to rank amongst the lower tier of potential major-pro cities in terms of population, TV market size, and a host of other criteria, a major-pro team in the city is always going to struggle to succeed financially. The only way a Hartford-based NHL franchise could hope to succeed - and even then, most likely by the slimmest of margins - would be to successfully market itself to the entire State of Connecticut. That's impossible given that the state's sports loyalties have been historically divided between the Boston and New York markets. Particularly problematic is that the Southwestern corner of the state - largely coterminous with Fairfield County - culturally falls under the sway of New York City. As a result, residents of Connecticut's most affluent region align themselves with New York City's sports teams... the NHL Rangers most definitely included. A Hartford-based NHL franchise is not going to be able to establish a foothold amongst fans in that region, which means said team is not going to succeed financially over the long-haul.

Look at the numbers from Hartford's first go-around as an NHL market...

Average Attendance

1979-80 - 9,854

1980-81 - 11,706

1981-82 - 11,703

1982-83 - 10,586

1983-84 - 11,506

1984-85 - 12,059

1985-86 - 12,769

1986-87 - 14,230

1987-88 - 14,574

1988-89 - 13,821

1989-90 - 13,705

1990-91 - 12,404

1991-92 - 10,896

1992-93 - 10,144

1993-94 - 10,407

1994-95 - 11,835

1995-96 - 11,983

1996-97 - 13,680

Even if we throw out the 1979-80 season in acknowledgement of the fact that the team played half the year in Springfield, the numbers aren't pretty. Just two seasons in which the Whalers averaged more than 14,000 fans per game. Just five seasons in which they averaged more than 13,000 fans per game. Just eight seasons in which they averaged more than 12,000 fans per game. In the seventeen seasons that the Whalers played all of their home games in Hartford, the team failed to crack the 12,000 fans per game mark nine times. That doesn't speak to a robust market for NHL hockey.

And for those who will argue that the product on the ice wasn't good enough to warrant larger crowds, I would answer that Hartford's being a marginal, small market team played a role in creating that competitive disadvantage. When a small-market franchise is forced to operate at the financial margins due to the size of its target market, it will inevitably show up in the on-ice/on-field product. When the product is negatively impacted, attendance is damaged. When attendance drops, the financial margins are further reduced.

Sorry, but Hartford's time as an NHL market has passed. In fact, the argument can be made that it was extremely fortunate to have ever played host to a major-pro team at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You'd have one bomb-ass argument if Hartford hadn't been replaced by Raleigh, which is just as small, marginal, and extremely fortunate to have pro sports. However, they were, so tl;dr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, as a response to your whole "they cant have a team that in an area that is split between Boston and NY fans"....what would you say about the Devils, who were put right in the middle of Rangers, Islanders, and Flyers territory.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think they could make a go of it, but the biggest factor is a suitable arena. The biggest factor to the Whalers being uprooted was the lack of a modern arena and facilities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this