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More proof we need to overthrow the NCAA!


Burkell007

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Why should the NCAA care that an athlete washed their car on campus?

You start a "slippery slope'. John Infante, who no longer works for an institution or the NCAA, explains it in the Bylaw Blog.

But consider the alternative. If we take “university water for car washes” to its logical conclusion, we get “personal valet services for athletes.” I think it is safe to say there is widespread (but not unanimous) agreement amongst the NCAA membership and even the public that interns washing and waxing athletes’ cars during practice or class should not be allowed. Nor should those interns do the athletes’ laundry, pick up their dry cleaning, or run other errands for athletes.

So if use of university water should be allowed and a personal assistant provided by the university should not, where is the line drawn? If water is ok, can athletes use university soap? If car wash soap is allowed, what about laundry soap? Is the use of laundry machines then permitted? Can the university build a car wash next to the athletic facilities for athletes to use free of charge?

These questions might sound ridiculous but they are exactly the ones that would be asked if the NCAA deregulated in this area. Some would be asked when a proposal was being developed. Some would be asked after the proposal was published. And the rest would be asked by coaches who will use any nook and cranny of NCAA rules to get an edge.

All in all, this was the school self-reporting the issue, and the NCAA never ruled on this and the WCC explained the process after a reporter and a byline writer were factually incorrect.

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Fair enough points on the system working, but is water so expensive on the West Coast that she could have used $20 worth for a car wash? I don't pay that much for water in a month here in flyover country.

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If it was turned in by the school, wouldn't the NCAA be obligated to do at least something about it, rather than just laugh and say "nbd"? They probably just said "ok have her pay 20" without much thought or without using an hour of someone's time (probably worth more than $20) to calculate an exact amount. IF it was turned in and they ignored it, then other schools who turn things in could gripe and stretch to compare their situation to this. If the NCAA was made aware by the student's school, then I fail to see where the complaint is - at least if you look in the if picture.

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Fair enough points on the system working, but is water so expensive on the West Coast that she could have used $20 worth for a car wash? I don't pay that much for water in a month here in flyover country.

Actually, I wouldn't be surprised if $20 is what it would cost to wash a car. I remember watching a documentary about water stressed regions, and the south/western states are certainly an area at high risk. That's why I'm not looking forward to the States inevitably stealing buying up our freshwater resources soon, a la Nestle Bottling Company.

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I have had to enforce rules on a job (and it's a big part of why I got out) and rules enforcement is not about "common sense". "Common sense" tells us that 1) this is no big deal and 2) there was no intent or recognition on how she was really benefiting from her "theft". In my case, it was zoning code enforcement and if some business's sign was say, an inch too close to the neighboring property or public right-of-way, I had to make 'em move it. And they'd always say "well it's only an inch" and some would even bring up "common sense says that this is nothing." And they were not wrong, but then two inches is only one more inch than the last guy, then three inches...there was nowhere to draw the line except right at the letter of the rule. They "slippery slope" issue was very real.

This is where I sympathize with the NCAA more than most. They have the slipper slope issue here and it's quite real. We've seen punishments handed down for things that common sense tells us were no big deal, but you pull your own rule enforcement teeth out every time you let stuff go.

So I am totally serious when I say this...oftentimes, there is no room for "common sense" in rules enforcement.

And as pointed out above, "common sense" is not as much on her side as the headline would have us believe anyway.

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A slippery slope is a logical fallacy, though. Saying "x will inevitably lead to y which will inevitably lead to z and then before you know it it'll be legal for people to marry their dogs on Mars" is actually arguing against yourself.

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Fair enough points on the system working, but is water so expensive on the West Coast that she could have used $20 worth for a car wash? I don't pay that much for water in a month here in flyover country.

I don't know what it's like in Oregon, but here in Colorado the state will write you a citation for using too much water. And it's a pretty large fine too.

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Yeah, the more that comes out about this the less and less bad the NCAA actually looks. Yet look how it only took one inaccurate headline to get people up in arms about this.

Not to mention a knee-jerk bias against the NCAA as an institution (witness the very title of this thread).

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Fair enough points on the system working, but is water so expensive on the West Coast that she could have used $20 worth for a car wash? I don't pay that much for water in a month here in flyover country.

Actually, I wouldn't be surprised if $20 is what it would cost to wash a car. I remember watching a documentary about water stressed regions, and the south/western states are certainly an area at high risk. That's why I'm not looking forward to the States inevitably stealing buying up our freshwater resources soon, a la Nestle Bottling Company.

Blame overpopulation in the Western U.S. and the cheap housing boom of the early and mid 2000s. So many water sources out here, especially the Colorado River, are being depleted for urban and crop use, that bodies of water have been drying up to the bone faster than rainstorms have had time to replenish them. So many cities in the West should not have even existed, let alone have population explosions, over the last 30 years (Las Vegas, Phoenix, San Diego, even here in Los Angeles are some of the most notorious boom hotspots), and combined with our government's free-credit, no-checking housing policies for homeowners up until the start of the Great Recession (adjusted, jumbo, subprime loans), this has set up an ultimate disaster situation for a region of 84 million people (I'm counting Texas and California as part of the American Southwest).

The Sierra Nevada snowpacks this year only have 15% of normal replenishing water content this year, while Owens Lake has been permanently dried because of the overpopulation demands from the 19 million residents of Southern California. Meanwhile, Las Vegas' main worry is the drying of Lake Mead, which has not had a plentiful supply of water to carry Vegas since 1983 because of its nightmarish growth and suburban planning. The whole state of Texas underwent a hellish drought two years ago, while the the rest of the contiguous U.S. had its hottest and driest summer ever last July. Add all these factors, combined with the ever changing consequences of climate change, and you have a prone mega disaster of dry conditions and people needing to gobble all the water available to quench their thirst.

What I fear is a full-on war between us and Canada for precious water resources in my lifetime, the same battles some African and Asian nations are engaging on right now.

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Excellent post. And this isn't even new. There have been on-and-off water wars in southern California for at least sixty-some years now, haven't there?

But yeah, to tie this into That One Other Thread, this is precisely why I wouldn't want to "chase the Sun Belt." Not only has the bubble burst, but there won't even be any water to blow bubbles in. God, what an awful sentence. Who am I, Tom Friedman? Kill me.

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Until a few months ago, I had only heard of how great Chinatown was. I didn't know it was about water!

Also, I went to Vegas for the first time earlier this year. That city shouldn't exist. There's no excuse for it.

We're very frivolous with our natural resources.

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When I played Final Fantasy VII and realized the Gold Saucer was Las Vegas I was like at-t-infinity-mind-blown-o.gif but too bad ours isn't accessed by a flying trolley from a depressed mining town because that'd be fun.

I'm sure we can get by with Las Vegas proper, but the explosion of sprawl around it might go down as one of the dumbest things our country has ever done, at least in the urban planning division.

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