charger77

The Big Ol' Counterfeit Jersey Thread

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I'm sure these Chinese sweat shops are paying the exact same wages and benefits that the legit companies use and they're also using union labor and creating American jobs right?

Are these really made in sweatshops though? Most of the counterfeiting rings I've seen taken down were all run by 2 or 3 people, they just had a ton of machines

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As a similiar example, many people think that NFL tickets are too expensive, however at the first sight of a fake ticket a person is not getting into a game why is that practice not tolerated, but fake jereys etc... are?

Seriously? Maybe it's because someone with a fake ticket creates problems for the person who legitimately bought a ticket and finds their seat occupied by someone else? Maybe we can equate the two when buying a counterfeit jersey takes a legit jersey off of someone elses back.

I have been reading this thread with a bit of interest, sometimes impressed by and sometimes bemused by the arguments advanced. Some of the sweeping generalisations ignore the concept that not all laws are equally just; a moral actor feels perfectly fine about breaking those laws which uphold injustice.

Someone already mentioned smoking pot. When I used to smoke pot, I had absolutely no compunction about breaking the law (I had fear of getting caught, sure; but I had no moral quandary), because the law in question is itself morally objectionable. Mass lawbreaking is in such a case a social good, in the hope that the consensus eventually shifts to such a point where the law becomes so untenable that it will be overturned. Whereas, when I ride my bicycle, I obey the traffic rules, because the legal regime in that case is not morally reprehensible but beneficial to society.

It is not sufficent to make claims about the nature of lawbreaking in general (as though there is such a thing), while failing to acknowledge the great difference between just and unjust laws. Someone else's moral compass may differ from mine, of course; but surely everyone maintains this distinction, and has in his/her ethics a line past which he/she would consider the breaking of a law to be entirely morally correct. (Incidentally: my point of view on the moral questions of counterfeiting is that I am sympathetic to the argument about unfair labour conditions, but not to the one about IP protection.)

On the practical side, reacting only to the quoted material, I want to say that I am baffled by the comment about counterfeit tickets. The comparison doesn't make any sense to me because someone with a fake ticket will never get into the game, due to the fact that the fakery will be spotted. So the person who buys a fake ticket cheats only himself or herself, and gets no benefit whatsoever.

Whereas, the person who buys a fake jersey does get the psychic benefit of showing fandom of a team or a player. Most other people seeing the jersey won't notice the difference; the wearer of the fake jersey will thus get the same conversation-starting benefit from the fake that a legal jersey would provide.

In other words, the counterfeit jerseys are often good enough to function as the real thing, while the counterfeit tickets never are. For this reason, I find the comparison to counterfeit tickets a bit incoherent.

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As a similiar example, many people think that NFL tickets are too expensive, however at the first sight of a fake ticket a person is not getting into a game why is that practice not tolerated, but fake jereys etc... are?

Seriously? Maybe it's because someone with a fake ticket creates problems for the person who legitimately bought a ticket and finds their seat occupied by someone else? Maybe we can equate the two when buying a counterfeit jersey takes a legit jersey off of someone elses back.

I have been reading this thread with a bit of interest, sometimes impressed by and sometimes bemused by the arguments advanced. Some of the sweeping generalisations ignore the concept that not all laws are equally just; a moral actor feels perfectly fine about breaking those laws which uphold injustice.

Someone already mentioned smoking pot. When I used to smoke pot, I had absolutely no compunction about breaking the law (I had fear of getting caught, sure; but I had no moral quandary), because the law in question is itself morally objectionable. Mass lawbreaking is in such a case a social good, in the hope that the consensus eventually shifts to such a point where the law becomes so untenable that it will be overturned. Whereas, when I ride my bicycle, I obey the traffic rules, because the legal regime in that case is not morally reprehensible but beneficial to society.

It is not sufficent to make claims about the nature of lawbreaking in general (as though there is such a thing), while failing to acknowledge the great difference between just and unjust laws. Someone else's moral compass may differ from mine, of course; but surely everyone maintains this distinction, and has in his/her ethics a line past which he/she would consider the breaking of a law to be entirely morally correct. (Incidentally: my point of view on the moral questions of counterfeiting is that I am sympathetic to the argument about unfair labour conditions, but not to the one about IP protection.)

On the practical side, reacting only to the quoted material, I want to say that I am baffled by the comment about counterfeit tickets. The comparison doesn't make any sense to me because someone with a fake ticket will never get into the game, due to the fact that the fakery will be spotted. So the person who buys a fake ticket cheats only himself or herself, and gets no benefit whatsoever.

Whereas, the person who buys a fake jersey does get the psychic benefit of showing fandom of a team or a player. Most other people seeing the jersey won't notice the difference; the wearer of the fake jersey will thus get the same conversation-starting benefit from the fake that a legal jersey would provide.

In other words, the counterfeit jerseys are often good enough to function as the real thing, while the counterfeit tickets never are. For this reason, I find the comparison to counterfeit tickets a bit incoherent.

+1 - possibly the most well thought out post in this thread. I guess sometimes the quietest people really do have the loudest minds!

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So a comparison that may not have been the best one over the course of 73 pages justifies IP theft?

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Man, that's obviously a fake. And Kessel still signed it? AND the seller wants $800 for it? Unreal.

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Man, that's obviously a fake. And Kessel still signed it? AND the seller wants $800 for it? Unreal.

Wouldn't be surprised if the autograph is fake too.

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Man, that's obviously a fake. And Kessel still signed it? AND the seller wants $800 for it? Unreal.

Wouldn't be surprised if the autograph is fake too.

I was thinking that too, but I couldn't tell if it was or wasn't.

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Man, that's obviously a fake. And Kessel still signed it? AND the seller wants $800 for it? Unreal.

I know the point of the thread is anti-counterfeit jerseys, but let's be real: is a player really going to refuse to sign a jersey just because the letters are not in the correct font, or the word mark is crooked, or there are some loose strings?

However, that is a very good point that you made (later post) that there's a very strong likelihood that the signature is fake also. Its seems more likely that somebody makes fake jerseys with fake signatures than a fan buys a counterfeit jersey, gets it signed, and puts it on eBay.

EDIT: Also, I just realized that counterfeit is spelled incorrectly in the thread title. The e is missing.

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I know the point of the thread is anti-counterfeit jerseys, but let's be real: is a player really going to refuse to sign a jersey just because the letters are not in the correct font, or the word mark is crooked, or there are some loose strings?

Many players will not sign fakes. Also, many of them have licensing agreements with companies that will not allow them to do so either.

I've seen an interview with Wayne Gretzky where he said if you ever saw a fake with his sig on it that the sig is fake too.

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I know the point of the thread is anti-counterfeit jerseys, but let's be real: is a player really going to refuse to sign a jersey just because the letters are not in the correct font, or the word mark is crooked, or there are some loose strings?

Many players will not sign fakes. Also, many of them have licensing agreements with companies that will not allow them to do so either.

I've seen an interview with Wayne Gretzky where he said if you ever saw a fake with his sig on it that the sig is fake too.

So, after some research (a Google Image search of "Phil Kessel autograph"), I've come to the conclusion that the the sig on the fake Kessel jersey is fake also. Kessel does have one of those signatures that seems to look different on each thing he signs, but I'm fairly certain that the sig on the jersey is fake.

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The other day in Phoenix, I saw a really bad Devin Hester kids' jersey. You know it's bad when...

-Block font is used, not Bears font!

-The shoulders have the Bears logo on them, no TV numbers, and I don't think it was a GSH patch.

-The dark blue is rendered as black.

It was really, really horrid to look at.

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Even if that's true (it's not) RBK pays American workers better than minimum wage to put names and numbers on those replica jerseys. So add that to "$8". Plus add royalties (on the retail), overhead and profit.

Does anyone here understand basic business??

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For the record, I believe it costs RBK $8 to produce NFL replicas, which they sell for ~$35 to the retailers.

Not to be a dick but so?

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For the record, I believe it costs RBK $8 to produce NFL replicas, which they sell for ~$35 to the retailers.

Not to be a dick but so?

Not saying anything myself, but as I saw there was some discussion regarding these things, I decided to post them.

I got this information from an employee of a store that sold strictly sports jerseys. Not sure if the $8 included wages (probably not).

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ok here is a question, when on ebay I am looking at ones like this http://www.ebay.com/itm/Minnastoa-Timberwolves-Ricky-Rubio-Revolution-30-Away-Blue-Jersey-/280800787725?pt=US_Basketball_Fan_Shop&hash=item416107fd0d#ht_4368wt_952

and I know it is from hong kong but it looks legit, my question is, will i just not get it when I order it? or will I receive what I buy because that jersey looks legit and would love to get it

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