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Helmet Stripes Out Dated?


daveindc

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Is Michigan's helmet design outdated just because we don't have leather helmets in that pattern anymore?

It is outdated, which is exactly why they have kept it. How many other team have that design?

In Divisions I, II and III, seven teams.

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Not at all, but I will say that helmet stripes don't work for every team.

We're so used to certain teams with stripes on their helmet. But when you think about it, do they really need them? Like the Lions playing right now. Don't these stripes looking blocky and old fashioned? They don't need stripes.

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Is Michigan's helmet design outdated just because we don't have leather helmets in that pattern anymore?

It is outdated, which is exactly why they have kept it. How many other team have that design?

In Divisions I, II and III, seven teams.

The Michigan helmet is a novelty, and for whatever reason, it survived the switch to plastic helmets. Other designs, like the ones used by the Giants and Eagles, did not.

I think it's something that will begin to fade away, and some teams will cling to it, and that's ok. Maybe equipment will lead to some other obvious design like the raised center-stripe did.

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Is Michigan's helmet design outdated just because we don't have leather helmets in that pattern anymore?

It is outdated, which is exactly why they have kept it. How many other team have that design?

In Divisions I, II and III, seven teams.

The Michigan helmet is a novelty, and for whatever reason, it survived the switch to plastic helmets. Other designs, like the ones used by the Giants and Eagles, did not.

I think it's something that will begin to fade away, and some teams will cling to it, and that's ok. Maybe equipment will lead to some other obvious design like the raised center-stripe did.

Agreed.

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I don't see any NFL team that currently uses helmet stripes eliminating them. In fact wouldn't surprise me to see Denver and Tennessee go with more traditional helmet stripes at some point in the future. So to answer the original question, no.

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I don't see any NFL team that currently uses helmet stripes eliminating them. In fact wouldn't surprise me to see Denver and Tennessee go with more traditional helmet stripes at some point in the future. So to answer the original question, no.

Denver and Tennessee going back to "traditional" stripes? They aren't going back to those stripes. The stripes they have now are what's "traditional" to them at this point. If anything, they will do away with them altogether.

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It seems helmet stripes were intended to sort of decorate, or camouflage, the raised middle portion of the older style helmet which is not used anymore. Is it time to move away from helmet stripes?

Seems? Is there any proof of this, or is it just your opinion?

By your reasoning, there's no point to stripes of sleeves (or sleeve areas) or pants.

So, every team should just wear solid color uniforms with no embellishments, and just a decal (or not) on the helmet?

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I don't see any NFL team that currently uses helmet stripes eliminating them. In fact wouldn't surprise me to see Denver and Tennessee go with more traditional helmet stripes at some point in the future. So to answer the original question, no.

Denver and Tennessee going back to "traditional" stripes? They aren't going back to those stripes. The stripes they have now are what's "traditional" to them at this point. If anything, they will do away with them altogether.

Yes. The tapered stripes both use are products of the late 90s, remnants of a trend that's come and gone. I could see both going with traditional stripes because, whether you like them or not, they're considered the "proper" look for a football uniform. The practical reasons for them may have gone, but proper helmet stripes as a design element are still ingrained in the aesthetic of football.

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I don't see any NFL team that currently uses helmet stripes eliminating them. In fact wouldn't surprise me to see Denver and Tennessee go with more traditional helmet stripes at some point in the future. So to answer the original question, no.

Denver and Tennessee going back to "traditional" stripes? They aren't going back to those stripes. The stripes they have now are what's "traditional" to them at this point. If anything, they will do away with them altogether.

Yes. The tapered stripes both use are products of the late 90s, remnants of a trend that's come and gone. I could see both going with traditional stripes because, whether you like them or not, they're considered the "proper" look for a football uniform. The practical reasons for them may have gone, but proper helmet stripes as a design element are still ingrained in the aesthetic of football.

"Proper" and "traditional"? You sound like those old guys probably did when they complained as stripes first started to appear on helmets for the first time. Times change. Designs change. Move on.

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I don't see any NFL team that currently uses helmet stripes eliminating them. In fact wouldn't surprise me to see Denver and Tennessee go with more traditional helmet stripes at some point in the future. So to answer the original question, no.

Denver and Tennessee going back to "traditional" stripes? They aren't going back to those stripes. The stripes they have now are what's "traditional" to them at this point. If anything, they will do away with them altogether.

Yes. The tapered stripes both use are products of the late 90s, remnants of a trend that's come and gone. I could see both going with traditional stripes because, whether you like them or not, they're considered the "proper" look for a football uniform. The practical reasons for them may have gone, but proper helmet stripes as a design element are still ingrained in the aesthetic of football.

"Proper" and "traditional"? You sound like those old guys probably did when they complained as stripes first started to appear on helmets for the first time. Times change. Designs change. Move on.

What the hell is your problem? Helmet stripes work great. They're never going away at all. It's a football tradition, and it's going to stay as long as they're still wearing helmets in football.

PS: Nobody here knows you, and for you to make a first impression like this will make people dislike you from the start.

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I don't see any NFL team that currently uses helmet stripes eliminating them. In fact wouldn't surprise me to see Denver and Tennessee go with more traditional helmet stripes at some point in the future. So to answer the original question, no.

Denver and Tennessee going back to "traditional" stripes? They aren't going back to those stripes. The stripes they have now are what's "traditional" to them at this point. If anything, they will do away with them altogether.

Yes. The tapered stripes both use are products of the late 90s, remnants of a trend that's come and gone. I could see both going with traditional stripes because, whether you like them or not, they're considered the "proper" look for a football uniform. The practical reasons for them may have gone, but proper helmet stripes as a design element are still ingrained in the aesthetic of football.

Exactly.

The only team that could work with the tapered stripes now are the Ravens. The Panthers, Broncos & Titans all need to fix them. Especially the Titans & Broncos, they look entirely outdated. The Panthers, well, not sure how to explain it, but the novelty has worn off and it just doesn't look right. Looks to XFL to me.

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