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College Football Scheme Redesign


aeargle

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I do not call this an NCAA thing, because for this to happen, the NCAA would be null & void.

It's a "perfect (in my mind)" full scheme of a football season, if it were up to me.

Essentially, there are 128 teams (I took all 128 of the teams that will be considered FBS in 2015, with the exception of Old Dominion. Sorry ODU, someone had to go to make the numbers work & geographically/selfishly, it was easiest to drop you). These 128 teams are divided into 16 conferences of 8 teams, geographically placed. Each team will play 9 regular season games - 2 OOC games & 7 conference games. The 2 OOC games allow for rivalries to continue, especially the Commander in Chief Trophy.

This is where the fun starts. There is then a 128 team playoff, everybody's in. No complaining about being the first one out. Two nearby conferences will be joined together as somewhat of a geographical "cluster" and will play in a mini-16 team playoff, as pictured below:

Untitled-8.jpg

The survivor will then move on to face the survivor of the next nearest "cluster," starting an 8 team playoff to crown a national championship.

This will not be a rebrand of any teams, but rather branding the concepts of the conferences & large playoff games (the last round of 8).

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I hope this all makes some sense in other people's heads, it makes sense in mine.

Any thoughts?

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I don't think there's a perfect situation whatsoever for this, but this is probably as close as possible. I like the smaller regular season schedule. I have hated the talk about keeping a 12/13 game season then a 64 team bracket and what not. No team should have to play nearly 20 games, and they shouldn't get near the number of games the NFL plays. I'm very intrigued by all 128 teams getting in to the party.

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I don't think there's a perfect situation whatsoever for this, but this is probably as close as possible. I like the smaller regular season schedule. I have hated the talk about keeping a 12/13 game season then a 64 team bracket and what not. No team should have to play nearly 20 games, and they shouldn't get near the number of games the NFL plays. I'm very intrigued by all 128 teams getting in to the party.

I'm actually on the other side of the aisle, here.

If all 128 teams make the cut, the first 9 games of the season are meaningless. Football stands apart from sports like baseball and basketball in that regard. You can't just randomly lose a game or two and expect to make the post-season.

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What would even be he point of conferences?

That's actually a pretty good point. Using this method creates a situation that will be logistically unfair.

By forcing all teams in a conference to play one another before moving on, it'd mean that an extremely strong conference like the SEC would have a maximum of 1 team competing for the national championship. Since the SEC has at least 3 teams in the running for the national championship (in the now defunct BCS method), your method would eliminate those teams from competing for the championship, while weaker conferences could send a team that doesn't really deserve to be competing for a championship into the final 8.

If you are insistent on keeping every team in the running, I'd suggest splitting the conferences where each team is from a different conference, and the #1 from conference A plays the #8 from conference H. #2B plays #7G. etc, and then rotate that so that in the next 8, #1 B plays #8 H. This would keep the basic idea you have in the first round, but it would spread out the teams, and allow the best teams to compete against one another in the later rounds, even if they are in the same conference.

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Laray3 did the exact same thing as you except for he 8 conferences of 2 divisions of 8 teams, they played one more ooc game, and only the top team from each division made the playoffs, so I don't exactly appreciate this.

I take it that you don't like multiple NFL team concepts as well then?

What would even be he point of conferences?

That's actually a pretty good point. Using this method creates a situation that will be logistically unfair.

By forcing all teams in a conference to play one another before moving on, it'd mean that an extremely strong conference like the SEC would have a maximum of 1 team competing for the national championship. Since the SEC has at least 3 teams in the running for the national championship (in the now defunct BCS method), your method would eliminate those teams from competing for the championship, while weaker conferences could send a team that doesn't really deserve to be competing for a championship into the final 8.

If you are insistent on keeping every team in the running, I'd suggest splitting the conferences where each team is from a different conference, and the #1 from conference A plays the #8 from conference H. #2B plays #7G. etc, and then rotate that so that in the next 8, #1 B plays #8 H. This would keep the basic idea you have in the first round, but it would spread out the teams, and allow the best teams to compete against one another in the later rounds, even if they are in the same conference.

I see where you guys are coming from, for sure.

But, the SEC could potentially have up to 4 teams in the final 8, I'd say that's pretty decent odds. As I look at it, it could be Mizzou/Ark in 1, Georgia/Bama/Auburn/Tenn/Kentucky/Vandy in 1, Florida/SC in 1, & LSU/MissSt/OleMiss/A&M in 1. So based on last year's results: Mizzou (East Champ), SC (East runner up), Auburn (National Runner Up) & LSU/A&M (Not sure off the top of my head who'd take that).

The purpose of the conferences is to give all teams at least 9 games & to determine the seeding of the tournament. If you randomly put them in, you could potentially have Alabama vs Georgia in the first round. Plus it will keep the local rivalry games intact - Clem/SCar, UGA/GT, UGA/Aub, Aub/Bama, FSU/Florida, FSU/Miami, etc.

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What would even be he point of conferences?

That's actually a pretty good point. Using this method creates a situation that will be logistically unfair.

By forcing all teams in a conference to play one another before moving on, it'd mean that an extremely strong conference like the SEC would have a maximum of 1 team competing for the national championship. Since the SEC has at least 3 teams in the running for the national championship (in the now defunct BCS method), your method would eliminate those teams from competing for the championship, while weaker conferences could send a team that doesn't really deserve to be competing for a championship into the final 8.

If you are insistent on keeping every team in the running, I'd suggest splitting the conferences where each team is from a different conference, and the #1 from conference A plays the #8 from conference H. #2B plays #7G. etc, and then rotate that so that in the next 8, #1 B plays #8 H. This would keep the basic idea you have in the first round, but it would spread out the teams, and allow the best teams to compete against one another in the later rounds, even if they are in the same conference.

I see where you guys are coming from, for sure.

But, the SEC could potentially have up to 4 teams in the final 8, I'd say that's pretty decent odds. As I look at it, it could be Mizzou/Ark in 1, Georgia/Bama/Auburn/Tenn/Kentucky/Vandy in 1, Florida/SC in 1, & LSU/MissSt/OleMiss/A&M in 1. So based on last year's results: Mizzou (East Champ), SC (East runner up), Auburn (National Runner Up) & LSU/A&M (Not sure off the top of my head who'd take that).

The purpose of the conferences is to give all teams at least 9 games & to determine the seeding of the tournament. If you randomly put them in, you could potentially have Alabama vs Georgia in the first round. Plus it will keep the local rivalry games intact - Clem/SCar, UGA/GT, UGA/Aub, Aub/Bama, FSU/Florida, FSU/Miami, etc.

Yes--the SEC always has good odds. They have the best teams, that's how it's supposed to be.

EDIT: Cut out a bit of the quote to save space.

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Laray3 did the exact same thing as you except for he 8 conferences of 2 divisions of 8 teams, they played one more ooc game, and only the top team from each division made the playoffs, so I don't exactly appreciate this.

I take it that you don't like multiple NFL team concepts as well then?

What would even be he point of conferences?

That's actually a pretty good point. Using this method creates a situation that will be logistically unfair.

By forcing all teams in a conference to play one another before moving on, it'd mean that an extremely strong conference like the SEC would have a maximum of 1 team competing for the national championship. Since the SEC has at least 3 teams in the running for the national championship (in the now defunct BCS method), your method would eliminate those teams from competing for the championship, while weaker conferences could send a team that doesn't really deserve to be competing for a championship into the final 8.

If you are insistent on keeping every team in the running, I'd suggest splitting the conferences where each team is from a different conference, and the #1 from conference A plays the #8 from conference H. #2B plays #7G. etc, and then rotate that so that in the next 8, #1 B plays #8 H. This would keep the basic idea you have in the first round, but it would spread out the teams, and allow the best teams to compete against one another in the later rounds, even if they are in the same conference.

I see where you guys are coming from, for sure.

But, the SEC could potentially have up to 4 teams in the final 8, I'd say that's pretty decent odds. As I look at it, it could be Mizzou/Ark in 1, Georgia/Bama/Auburn/Tenn/Kentucky/Vandy in 1, Florida/SC in 1, & LSU/MissSt/OleMiss/A&M in 1. So based on last year's results: Mizzou (East Champ), SC (East runner up), Auburn (National Runner Up) & LSU/A&M (Not sure off the top of my head who'd take that).

The purpose of the conferences is to give all teams at least 9 games & to determine the seeding of the tournament. If you randomly put them in, you could potentially have Alabama vs Georgia in the first round. Plus it will keep the local rivalry games intact - Clem/SCar, UGA/GT, UGA/Aub, Aub/Bama, FSU/Florida, FSU/Miami, etc.

Yes--the SEC always has good odds. They have the best teams, that's how it's supposed to be.

I don't disagree. I was just pointing out to Lafarge that they will not only have 1 team in the hunt for the national title.

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Not exactly digging the conference name...a lot of college players are under 21.

I agree. I'd maybe pull from the geography, go with something associated with the Cumberland Mountain range, which extends into both Kentucky and Tennessee.

Also, Appalachian State is the only non-Kentucky or Tennessee team. How did they get selected for that? Asking because Cincinnati is literally on the border of Ohio and Kentucky. Not that it matters, since it appears we aren't getting team logos. Unless you're planning something like the B1G uses for their basketball midcourt logo.

2012BigTenBasketballTournament.png

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I agree with pianoknight. One outcome of any regular season should be to separate good teams from bad ones.

aergle, Why play 9 regular season games when all 128 teams would make the playoffs anyway?

I suggest determining a lower number for the number of teams that qualify for the playoffs and then developing some rules to determine how teams qualify for the playoffs.

Also, I am not a fan of alcohol reference for the conference you introduced.

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