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2014 NFL Season Thread


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Amazing video.

Now if they do that test with a "Colts" ball that doesn't deflate when it's in the same bucket with another ball that does, then I'll give the Pats the all-clear.

That chart with the plays/fumble is pretty spooky... really makes you wonder. It seems to go well beyond "coaching ball control", as if the other 31 teams don't care about fumbling.

So you're assuming the Colts and Pats prepare and inflate their footballs the exact same way. What were the pressures of the Colts footballs again?

And ball control can be coached. Tiki Barber used to fumble all the time...then he changed the grip and placement...then he rarely fumbled again. Maybe the Giants switched to deflated footballs.

Ball control can be coached, but the other 31 teams come pretty close to a Bell curve, while the Patriots are like 6 standard deviations above the mean.

Is this what we're going with now... the Pats rub their balls some special way that makes them deflate? They were fine two hours before the game, and the conditions they were exposed to during the first half should have been exactly the same as the Colts' balls. That couple hours of being out in the weather would get all the balls for both teams to the same temperature.

If 12 of the Colts balls were at 13.5 psi, and deflated by 1 psi (see PFT article on 1 psi deflation), they'd still be at 12.5 psi and legal. Again, we don't know any of the pressures of the Colts footballs.

If 12 of the Patriots balls were at 12.5 psi, and deflated by 1 psi, they'd be at 11.5 and "deflated".

Why was the pressure of the INT ball significantly lower than the rest of the Patriots footballs? That'd be my question. Did the Colts' equipment manager tamper with it on the sidelines to prove to the NFL that the balls were deflated?? Would the pressure of that one football be deflated 1 psi (like 10 of the others) if it wasn't intercepted??

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Amazing video.

Now if they do that test with a "Colts" ball that doesn't deflate when it's in the same bucket with another ball that does, then I'll give the Pats the all-clear.

That chart with the plays/fumble is pretty spooky... really makes you wonder. It seems to go well beyond "coaching ball control", as if the other 31 teams don't care about fumbling.

So you're assuming the Colts and Pats prepare and inflate their footballs the exact same way. What were the pressures of the Colts footballs again?

And ball control can be coached. Tiki Barber used to fumble all the time...then he changed the grip and placement...then he rarely fumbled again. Maybe the Giants switched to deflated footballs.

Ball control can be coached, but the other 31 teams come pretty close to a Bell curve, while the Patriots are like 6 standard deviations above the mean.

Is this what we're going with now... the Pats rub their balls some special way that makes them deflate? They were fine two hours before the game, and the conditions they were exposed to during the first half should have been exactly the same as the Colts' balls. That couple hours of being out in the weather would get all the balls for both teams to the same temperature.

If 12 of the Colts balls were at 13.5 psi, and deflated by 1 psi (see PFT article on 1 psi deflation), they'd still be at 12.5 psi and legal. Again, we don't know any of the pressures of the Colts footballs.

If 12 of the Patriots balls were at 12.5 psi, and deflated by 1 psi, they'd be at 11.5 and "deflated".

Why was the pressure of the INT ball significantly lower than the rest of the Patriots footballs? That'd be my question. Did the Colts' equipment manager tamper with it on the sidelines to prove to the NFL that the balls were deflated?? Would the pressure of that one football be deflated 1 psi (like 10 of the others) if it wasn't intercepted??

This.

All we've heard is that the Colts balls were still legal. Nobody has come out and said that they retained the same pressure pregame and at halftime.

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Welp, PFT just unleashed a column that notes a league source says 10 of the footballs were closer to 1 psi below the minimum, and not 2 psi.

"PFT" and "league source" just drip with veracity and credibility don't they....

Name names please.

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I seriously doubt the league would make the Colts aware of a surprise inspection. The Colts (or some other team) may have told the league and they most likely responded with "We'll look into it" But they are not going to tell any team how they plan to go about looking into it.

I could easily see the NFL telling the Colts "Hey, since you've brought up this concern, we'll check the footballs at halftime to see if they meet the standard."

So the NFL, which has acted to shield and protect New England from its worst excesses and rule breaking before, would not give New England and noted Goodell ally (that's a rarity nowadays) Bob Kraft a heads up if they gave one to the Colts?

How gullible do you think we are?

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I seriously doubt the league would make the Colts aware of a surprise inspection. The Colts (or some other team) may have told the league and they most likely responded with "We'll look into it" But they are not going to tell any team how they plan to go about looking into it.

I could easily see the NFL telling the Colts "Hey, since you've brought up this concern, we'll check the footballs at halftime to see if they meet the standard."

So the NFL, which has acted to shield and protect New England from its worst excesses and rule breaking before, would not give New England and noted Goodell ally (that's a rarity nowadays) Bob Kraft a heads up if they gave one to the Colts?

How gullible do you think we are?

If they were really good friends, the league wouldn't have tested the footballs at all and told the Colts to quit whining. Do you really find cheaters by telling them in advance what's going to happen? "Hey...We're going to check to see if you're breaking the rules...Just a heads up."

Welp, PFT just unleashed a column that notes a league source says 10 of the footballs were closer to 1 psi below the minimum, and not 2 psi.

"PFT" and "league source" just drip with veracity and credibility don't they....

Name names please.

If you've read Florio's articles this week, you'd realize he hasn't protected the Pats at all. No reason for him to try to help out now. Why write an article that refutes Mortensen if it wasn't somewhat credible?

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Two hours and 15 minutes before kickoff, the officials tested the Patriots' balls with a pressure gauge and they were all legal. But when the officials tested the balls at halftime, 11 of the 12 Patriots balls were at least two PSI below the minimum limit of 12.5, according to ESPN's Chris Mortensen.

There's too much of a range for it to be just QB preference. The only explanation would be if the Colts overinflated their balls, and they deflated down into the legal range due to weather. I could totally buy that the Patriots' balls deflated from 12.5 to 10.5ish, but what happened to the Colts' balls? If they started out at the upper limit, they should have still been underinflated by halftime if it were really the weather.

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If the Colts balls were overinflated (which has been speculated) then the pressure would have been brought down during the pregame inspection. The footballs for both teams were legal before the game. At halftime, one team had deflated footballs while the other team did not. The weather conditions were the same so blaming it on the weather at this point just makes no sense.

Let's get another thing clear. Aaron Rogers never admitted to cheating. He can issue the footballs pregame with pink polka-dots if he wants to. Every team does what they want to the football prior to inspection. This is not illegal. But once they are inspected, they are to be left alone. The Patriots allegedly thought they were above the rules.

I'm pretty tired of the argument "Well everyone else is doing it" First of all, that is complete garbage. You, I, and nobody else here knows that to be true. The next time you are speeding down the highway and get stopped, just tell the officer someone else was speeding too and let's see if he let's you off. Perhaps they were not the only ones doing it, but they got caught.

No matter what happens here, this is still very bad for the NFL. Not much talk about the Super Bowl a week before it is to be played.

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If the Colts balls were overinflated (which has been speculated) then the pressure would have been brought down during the pregame inspection. The footballs for both teams were legal before the game. At halftime, one team had deflated footballs while the other team did not. The weather conditions were the same so blaming it on the weather at this point just makes no sense.

Let's get another thing clear. Aaron Rogers never admitted to cheating. He can issue the footballs pregame with pink polka-dots if he wants to. Every team does what they want to the football prior to inspection. This is not illegal. But once they are inspected, they are to be left alone. The Patriots allegedly thought they were above the rules.

I'm pretty tired of the argument "Well everyone else is doing it" First of all, that is complete garbage. You, I, and nobody else here knows that to be true. The next time you are speeding down the highway and get stopped, just tell the officer someone else was speeding too and let's see if he let's you off. Perhaps they were not the only ones doing it, but they got caught.

No matter what happens here, this is still very bad for the NFL. Not much talk about the Super Bowl a week before it is to be played.

Looks like somebody's been reading the counterfeit jersey thread!

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If the Colts balls were overinflated (which has been speculated) then the pressure would have been brought down during the pregame inspection. The footballs for both teams were legal before the game. At halftime, one team had deflated footballs while the other team did not. The weather conditions were the same so blaming it on the weather at this point just makes no sense.

You're making the assumption that all of the footballs were at the same psi before the game. Again, if the Colts went into the game at 13.5, and had a 1 psi drop just as the Patriots' footballs had...

The weather is certainly still in play.

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If the Colts balls were overinflated (which has been speculated) then the pressure would have been brought down during the pregame inspection. The footballs for both teams were legal before the game. At halftime, one team had deflated footballs while the other team did not. The weather conditions were the same so blaming it on the weather at this point just makes no sense.

You're making the assumption that all of the footballs were at the same psi before the game. Again, if the Colts went into the game at 13.5, and had a 1 psi drop just as the Patriots' footballs had...

The weather is certainly still in play.

Since IIRC air pressure is also partially a function of how many air molecules are in the football/enclosed space. So I don't think they would register the same drop as the Patriots even in your scenario.

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If the Colts balls were overinflated (which has been speculated) then the pressure would have been brought down during the pregame inspection. The footballs for both teams were legal before the game. At halftime, one team had deflated footballs while the other team did not. The weather conditions were the same so blaming it on the weather at this point just makes no sense.

You're making the assumption that all of the footballs were at the same psi before the game. Again, if the Colts went into the game at 13.5, and had a 1 psi drop just as the Patriots' footballs had...

The weather is certainly still in play.

Since IIRC air pressure is also partially a function of how many air molecules are in the football/enclosed space. So I don't think they would register the same drop as the Patriots even in your scenario.

The Colts' footballs would have a larger or smaller decrease in psi?

SportScience in 2010 tested footballs at 10 degrees for an hour. 2.5psi decrease for a football originally inflated at 13.5. This might have more relevance for the Baltimore game.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=59PEmRIMTo0&feature=youtu.be&t=1m50s

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I don't think it's terribly relevant for either sees as it wasn't that cold in either game.

But Guy-Lussac's law does prove that 12.5psi will drop to 11.92psi when the temperature drops from 75F to 51F. And a 13.5psi will drop to 12.87psi.

You might not think it was really cold, but a 20-degree drop in temperature will have an effect on the pressure.

And the Baltimore game, the weather was mid-to-low 20s. So that'd be a 50-degree drop in temp...which explains why the kballs were underflated, as noted by Harbaugh.

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Yes, but are we ignoring the Chris Mortensen report that 11 of the 12 Patriots' footballs were 2 psi below the lower limit? That would put it beyond the zone where it could be explained away by QB preference.

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Now I'm seeing reports that the original psi discrepancy was off...

This story might just end up deflated itself... not sure how harsh the NFL will go if they can't find proof of cheating. We're talking air in a ball not violence or personal misconduct.

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Yes, but are we ignoring the Chris Mortensen report that 11 of the 12 Patriots' footballs were 2 psi below the lower limit? That would put it beyond the zone where it could be explained away by QB preference.

That report may not be correct. There's other information coming out that says only one ball was 2psi below the lower limit...

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