Salvy_Mic

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    Los Angeles Rams, Los Angeles Dodgers, Los Angeles Lakers, Los Angeles Kings, UCLA, LA Galaxy
  1. You're probably right, so in that case, they need to procure better paint that will bond with the synthetic field better. Even before field use, the last few synthetic turf Super Bowls had fields that looked washed out and as if the colors were already running.
  2. Yeah, but that's that St. Louis navy shade. Believe me, being from LA and seeing the team come back, there are very few fans out here that want to keep any remnant of the St. Louis colors around. All you see at the games are the blue and yellows. We're stuck with the St. Louis uniforms because the team doesn't want to change until they move into the new stadium.
  3. If I recall correctly, the shade of blue the Rams wore in their blue and white days was never that dark. That's almost LAPD blue right there...which isn't a bad look by the way. An oddity of the Rams uniforms has alwas been that the helmets have always been more midnight blue, while the jerseys are a shade between royal and navy blue. Personally, I've always wanted the helmet shade to match the jersey shade. The majority of LA Rams fans though want the blue and yellow Ferragamo/Dickerson/Youngblood era uniforms back, with the Deacons as throwback alternates.
  4. Here's what gets me. Considering these sorts of fields are synthetic anyway, would it perhaps make more sense to actually have the field itself pre-colored at the plant? They could install the field in jigsaw like fashion, the colors wouldn't run, then they could probably recycle or donate the patches once the game is over. I think that's what they do at MetLife, because the end zones always look like they're full of barely noticeable squares, while the rest of the field stays static. Then again, painting is probably more cost effective, but whatever paint they're using, it does not bond well at all with artificial turf.
  5. The field started looking like crap as the game went on. I don't know if it's the paint they're using or what, but I've never seen a big game field deteriorate like that. I mean, there have been plenty of college bowl game fields that have looked good through the whole game. Just total amateur hour here. From a non-aesthetic POV, the field quality was poor. Guys were slipping the entire game and I think Dion Lewis suffered a pretty bad injury on the trick play at the end of regulation. And it was supposed to be FieldTurf, or somesuch, too. No excuse. Last years field was bad too. I feel like they're trying to get this painted and prepped at the very last minute.
  6. I like how the numerals are similar to the Vikings' number font. Very clean design.
  7. Showing, no pun intended, steely resolve in Foxborough and without LeVeon Bell, the Steelers defense manages to use a quickly improving pass rush to put Brady under constant pressure in order to keep pace until the 4th quarter, where a highlight reel catch in the end zone on the Steelers' comeback drive by Antonio Brown allows the Steelers to escape their house of horrors with a demon-exorcising 24-21 win. Meanwhile, the Packers offensive line is able to hold off a persistent Falcons' pass rush, allowing Aaron Rodgers and Matt Ryan to exchange touchdowns in a high scoring game. Inevitably, the Packers pull out a natrow win of their own with an improbable Hail Mary TD pass to Jared Cook to win 49-45. In the Super Bowl, Aaron Rodgers proves himself to be a greater QB than Ben Roethlisberger, and despite a record-breaking game by Antonio Brown, Rodgers engineers a game winning TD drive with 3:30 left and caps it off with a scrambling scoring pass to Devante Adams in the back of the end zone to lead the Packers to their 5th Super Bowl title with a 35-28 win.