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Drakonius26

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Everything posted by Drakonius26

  1. Does anybody know what font is being used to display "Los Angeles" right above Good Morning America At The Oscars?
  2. Wishful thinking... but I'd love to see them in San Antonio.
  3. Thanks, glenn. I couldn't tell if it was a modified version of those fonts, because the green really bleeds into the blue.
  4. Hey, guys. I know this isn't the best picture, but can someone tell me the font (numbers and the captain's C) that's used on this prototype jersey? If anyone had a vector image of the entire font that would be even better. Thanks.
  5. Would somebody please tell me what kind of numbers do the Blue Bombers use?
  6. Then that means it's a slam-dunk for Gary Bettman to relocate the Phoenix Coyotes there, am I right?
  7. Ladies and Gentlemen, the bull that is EBay. Thank God, I decided to finally get rid of my account on Amazon and EBay a long time ago. It was ridiculous shipping prices and scam artists that turned me off.
  8. Here's an article from the Seattle Times backing this up http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nba/2015487119_arena02.html & a news broadcast as well http://www.kirotv.com/news/28423790/detail.html Interesting, but I really don't see any relocation happening, until the actual arena is build and ready for both leagues. KeyArena is definitely not an option, even if on a temporary basis, for either the NBA or NHL.
  9. I think you misunderstood my point. I'm not debating pro hockey's viability in Houston in the past. I'm debating its viability in the present. The Aeros are long gone. Any NHL team in Houston, even if they use the Aeros name, will have to start from scratch. They'd have to compete with the Rockets for fans, ticket sales, merchandise sales, tv ratings, and local corporate dollars. The Rockets, being the more entrenched of the two teams, would have a marked advantage in all of these areas. Um, what? I mean, I know what you're getting at (the loss of the WHA Aeros) but it's not like there isn't a current team that's top-10 in the AHL in attendance named Aeros playing an an NHL-ready rink right now (Toyota Center opened in 2003 with 17,000 seats for hockey). Um, yeah. Houston hasn't seen top tier pro hockey since the WHA went under. Saying that the AHL Aeros' success is proof of 1) the market and 2) that a Houston NHL team wouldn't have to start from scratch doesn't hold water. The differences between an AHL presence and an NHL presence are too great. This is the type of thinking that put teams in Miami, Atlanta, and Phoenix. The "potential" for media and corporate dollars has led to the NHL sunbelt madness to begin with. It's time to turn away from "potential" markets and refocus on markets that actually care about hockey. Seattle, Milwaukee, and Quebec City should all be considered before Houston. There's one huge issue with those markets you mentioned, Ice. While they're more natural a fit for hockey than Houston, I seriously doubt the NHL would move to a city that doesn't have a decent arena to support the product, compared to Houston. If they did, then yes, I'd put all three of them over Houston, but as it stands they could probably benefit not only from the NBA lockout, but looking to put some exhibition games in Houston, featuring the Stars vs. another team. I mean, I would imagine holding some games there would be more feasible than a regular season opener in Prague.
  10. I think you misunderstood my point. I'm not debating pro hockey's viability in Houston in the past. I'm debating its viability in the present. The Aeros are long gone. Any NHL team in Houston, even if they use the Aeros name, will have to start from scratch. They'd have to compete with the Rockets for fans, ticket sales, merchandise sales, tv ratings, and local corporate dollars. The Rockets, being the more entrenched of the two teams, would have a marked advantage in all of these areas. Um, what? I mean, I know what you're getting at (the loss of the WHA Aeros) but it's not like there isn't a current team that's top-10 in the AHL in attendance named Aeros playing an an NHL-ready rink right now (Toyota Center opened in 2003 with 17,000 seats for hockey). The rest of your premise is correct - that they'll have to battle with the Rockets for market share - but, and this is a big but, they are also in a top-10 media market in this country with a track-record for supporting hockey. It's not like putting a third team in Atlanta, or replacing a failing Coyotes team with another franchise. I honestly think Houston could give it a go, if, and only if, the NHL put some contingencies on it, like they did in Winnipeg. And that may be the new norm - guaranteeing a certain level of ticket sales. Maybe not as high a level as the 'Peg was required to support, but maybe a place like Houston would be required to sell 7,000 season tickets with 1-3 year commitments. Okay, I agree mostly with the first part of what you're saying, but Sodboy makes a point. You have to prove that for the first few years that such a market could support the team. 7,000 tickets is quite low, and while holding Houston to Winnipeg's standards is rather unfair (American vs. Canadian market, 3 existing professional teams compared to none for Winnipeg until recently), if they could guarantee maybe 13,000 season tickets, with 3-5 year commitments (because Houston has a much larger pool of corporate sponsors than Winnipeg), that could be a much more reasonable agreement. Obviously, Houston could be classified as a non-traditional market, but I'd rather give them a try, along with Milwaukee, possibly Portland/Seattle, or even Quebec, than keep a team in Phoenix (failed market) or try again in Atlanta. Some quick comparisons... Manitoba averaged 8,404 fans per game during the regular season, while Houston averaged 6,326 fans per game during the regular season. That's 2nd and 8th respectively. Obviously, Winnipeg will shatter those marks this coming year, and oh, by the way, Milwaukee averaged 5,796 fans per game, 11th overall, and behind Houston. Like I said, there's potential there, and obviously I would imagine it would be an easier sell, professional hockey, compared to minor-league hockey.
  11. Milwaukee's DMA is smaller than Pittsburgh's, but I think that's a bit deceptive because... unlike the Bucks... an NHL club could realistically expect to draw significant TV viewership (and on the weekends, attendance) from Madison and Green Bay/Appleton. As far as the economy, it's not exactly bustling, but it is quite stable (stable being a highly relative term by today's standards, of course). The rapid job loss that characterized Milwaukee in the 80s and 90s plateaued in the 2000s and there has been some small, but notable job growth in the healthcare and alternative energy industries. In fact, Milwaukee has quietly become a player in the former due to the presence of Aurora and Covenant. Now, Milwaukee/Wisconsin is definitely NOT a 4-sport market. Had we gotten an NHL team in the early 90s, the Bucks would likely have moved by now. But the fact that the Bucks, can still pull middle-of-the-road attendance with next to no community presence and as pathetic as they've been in recent memory is proof that this is indeed a 3-sport market. All that said, I think we can hold off on the NHL-to-Milwaukee speculation at least until the Senator announces he's looking for a buyer for the Bucks (which may happen soon since he's retiring next year). I think you're right on all counts. I think Milwaukee would be a great NHL market, but it would come at the expense of the Bucks. Then again, Wisconsin has a proud and rich Civil War tradition, so if Columbus doesn't want the Blue Jackets there's a home out there where they wouldn't even have to change the name. I honestly don't think the general populace of Milwaukee and the surrounding area would mind trading a basketball team for a hockey team, and it would probably be wildly successful and definitely sustainable through the down years, much like the Minnesota Wild. A possible division of Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Milwaukee, Minnesota, Nashville, and St. Louis would be awesome.
  12. Whoops, worded that incorrectly there. My mistake I had a couple more windows open, and had to re-read what had gotten posted, anywho... Actually the Aeros were extremely well-supported when they were in Houston, more so than the Rockets, though the Rockets took a long time to get good. Even with their NBA Finals run in 1981, fans didn't start coming until the Hakeem and Ralph era of the mid-1980's. One of the main reasons for the Aeros not merging with the NHL which would later lead to the Molson Boycott by the Canadian cities like Edmonton, Winnipeg, and Quebec that were trying to get into the league, was the initial merger agreement in 1977. As a result, during the merger discussions it was revealed that those three cities would be included, as would other hockey teams, instead of an earlier proposal that could've guaranteed those three cities, as well as Cincinnati, Hartford, and Houston all a spot at the table. Basically it was proposal initially made by then-commissioner Ziegler, and later stated by Cincinnati Stingers owner Bill DeWitt Jr. When Harold Ballard and some of the other owners he was close with, voted down that proposal, which would be a key in triggering the boycott, some the folks with both leagues with detailed information of the negotiations told the Aeros owner Kenneth Schnitzer the final team would be the New England/Hartford Whalers instead of the club in Houston, he basically told both leagues to go themselves and soon attendance plummeted with this news and he closed up shop the following year. He also tried to ask that the Aeros be put in as a pure expansion franchise or to relocate another failing club to Houston to replace the WHA Houston Aeros, but once again the NHL refused.
  13. At this point I think the ship has sailed for Houston. Going along with my "the NHL should avoid markets with established NBA teams" theory a NHL organization in Houston would have to compete with the Rockets for fans, ratings, merchandise sales, and corporate dollars. EDIT: For accuracy and completeness purposes, please refer to the following post about the Houston Aeros.
  14. Naturally, Milwaukee would do well in the NHL. I would imagine it would be an instant success like the Minnesota Wild, but the main problem is the Bradley Center, which is quite dated for an arena built in 1988. It's not aged well, and I'm not sure if the city of Milwaukee, much less the state of Wisconsin has any plans to fund and build an arena in the near future.
  15. I would imagine if Quebecor decides to chip in between 110 to 200 million dollars (depending on if a NHL franchise ends up relocating there) to help fund the New Quebec City Amphitheatre, it would be fairly simple math. If the NHL does indeed return to Quebec City, Quebecor could possibly be willing to pay for half the cost, and if the NHL doesn't return, then you're splitting up to 75% or 300 million three ways (if what Lee said is true). As for other markets, I believe Leslie Alexander was at one point, interested in purchasing the Oilers a while back, in order to relocate the team to Houston. I'm not trying to pump up Houston as a perfect landing spot, but there was some interest previously, and I believe the Toyota Center is a good locale for hockey. It can seat up to 17,800 for hockey games, and previously Houston wasn't considered by the NHL for hockey, because there was too much indecision in the market as to whether or not a new arena would ever be built. Obviously, that's not the case anymore.
  16. I was on the field for the Pats celebration in Pittsburgh for the 04 season. It was pretty awesome. Trophy was presented on the field in 01 when we beat them there, too. Not sure if it changed across the board or what. I said most times, not always. It seems the last few teams have had the conference championship trophy awarded inside the locker room if they beat the favored home team. At least since Roger Goodell took over.
  17. I think most times when the visiting team wins the Conference Championship, the league usually gives them the championship trophy in the visiting locker room.
  18. Bowlen's health has become more well known in town as of late. He's hardly involved anymore, which is part of the timing with hiring Elway to take a large part in running the team. It's likely that someone else will be owning the Broncos before long. I have a question about Kroenke's ownership situation. With him owning the Rams now, does him putting his Denver teams in his son's name satisfy the NFL's rules about owning sports teams in other NFL markets, or does it just buy him time before he's expected to sell them off? If he is still required to sell the Nuggets, Avalanche, and the others, that would be incentive for Kroenke to do the Bowlen and Kroenke trade teams-Bowlen sells to LA owners scenario. That scenario seems fairly ridiculous, but it does seem to have some of the right contributing factors (depending on the answer to my question). Weirder things have happened. Well, Carroll Rosenbloom and Robert Irsay traded teams back in 1972, so it's not as uncommon as you might think. Another thing to consider is if the NFL considers St. Louis a failed market, much like the NHL does Atlanta. I mean, if the Rams relocate back to Los Angeles under Kroenke or another owners' leadership, that both the Cardinals and Rams in less than 30 years that have failed in St. Louis. It's not exactly a good track-record, and most likely something the NFL will consider if another team decides to relocate to an under-served market. If St. Louis loses their football team I would imagine the NFL would consider other domestic or international locations as preferable destinations (San Antonio, Toronto, etc.)
  19. See I disagree, I think all the ones before 83 were boring. It is nice to see that the teams started designing their own. But thats just me. I don't have a problem with them breaking the mold and creating their own, but of the designs are just awkward. Look at the Lakers 1985 ring... Black? Why not Purple? Or their logo like the Celtics did with their 1986 championship ring? By the way, they do it again in 1988. They had five diamonds for the five championships in Los Angeles, so why revert back to one in the 1988 championship ring? There's no doubt the rings prior to 1983 were boring, but I'd rather have something simple like that, compared to the crap they were producing occasionally after that year. It almost seems like instead of creating a ring that represents the journey and relates to the franchise's proud tradition, they chose to instead pick the design that simply looked good, and didn't fit at all.
  20. Those NBA Championship rings are terrible. After 1983, they lose not only the consistency, but also some of the designs just don't make any sense when including the franchise's history. The only team that seemed to stay grounded was the Spurs, but theirs isn't great either.
  21. I also like the football texture they have on both sides of the ring, that's really sharp, and the design is fairly solid, so I can't complain there either.
  22. You've got to be more specific than "home/road" when it comes to jerseys for IHL teams. Typically, the IHL had teams wear white at home before the All-Star break, dark at home after, and white at home again for the playoffs. I picked up a Vipers plum authentic for $34 forever ago on clearance from RCS. Love that jersey, and love the construction of all Bauer authentics. It would probably be a 1996-97, Detroit Vipers Home Jersey, and it was during the regular season when I went to that game, so that picture is the closest match to the jerseys I remember. Plus, I was a teenager then, so obviously there was no way I could convince my parents to buy me a sports jersey at that time. The Calgary Flames one though... man, I still kick myself over that one, as I had the funds to get it, but I remember devoting the money to a Super Bowl trip, the XBox 360, and other things, not realizing those jerseys would be clearly impossible to get post-lockout. I have the home and alternate versions, so when I go into my closet and decide which one to wear if the weather permits and I feel like wearing one, it just nags at me. This place has non-blank Flames jerseys from this era for Iginla and Phaneuf; I don't know if they're authentics or replicas. http://www.customthrowbackjerseys.com/categories/NHL-Hockey-Jerseys-/Calgary-Flames/ This place has a blank replica in XL only. http://www.carrollscove.com/caflnhlretej.html I have no idea how reputable either of these sellers are, but I hope this helps. Thanks, I'll check those out. I'm currently in the process of hunting for that first whale, the Vipers one will probably be a lot harder to find though.
  23. You've got to be more specific than "home/road" when it comes to jerseys for IHL teams. Typically, the IHL had teams wear white at home before the All-Star break, dark at home after, and white at home again for the playoffs. I picked up a Vipers plum authentic for $34 forever ago on clearance from RCS. Love that jersey, and love the construction of all Bauer authentics. It would probably be a 1996-97, Detroit Vipers Home Jersey, and it was during the regular season when I went to that game, so that picture is the closest match to the jerseys I remember. Plus, I was a teenager then, so obviously there was no way I could convince my parents to buy me a sports jersey at that time. The Calgary Flames one though... man, I still kick myself over that one, as I had the funds to get it, but I remember devoting the money to a Super Bowl trip, the XBox 360, and other things, not realizing those jerseys would be clearly impossible to get post-lockout. I have the home and alternate versions, so when I go into my closet and decide which one to wear if the weather permits and I feel like wearing one, it just nags at me.
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