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Soyuz TMA-14 Mission Patch


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The Russian space agency Roscosmos sponsored a contest for children under 14 to design a mission patch for the upcoming Soyuz TMA-14 mission to the International Space Station scheduled for launch on March 25. Commander Gennady Padalka and his crew selected a painting by Anna Chibiskova (age 12) from Moscow as the central element for their patch.

tma14_patch01.jpg

Crew:

Gennady Padalka (RSA) - Commander

Michael Barratt (NASA) - Flight Engineer

Launching:

Charles Simonyi (USA/Hungary) - Spaceflight Participant (will land with Soyuz TMA-13 in April 2009)

Landing:

Mukhtar Aymakhanov (Kazakhstan) - Flight Engineer (will launch on Soyuz TMA-16 in September 2009)

Launch: March 25, 2009

Landing: September 2009

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While I also cut some slack to the 12-year-old designer, I would have imagined a view of the globe from the opposite side, showing the Bering Strait, that point where the U.S. and Russia almost touch. But, the view that was chosen is evidently just as iconic a way of showing the continents in Russia as it is in the U.S. (even if this particular version of the globe features the novel twist of the omission of Greenland and the British Isles).

Regarding that part of the patch which presumably was not designed by the child: the use of the two different alphabets for the astronauts' names is interesting, if a little jarring. But, given that this is a Russian-language patch, I think it would have been more appropriate to spell all the names with the Cyrillic alphabet, as "Барратт" and "Симонйи".

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Regarding that part of the patch which presumably was not designed by the child: the use of the two different alphabets for the astronauts' names is interesting, if a little jarring. But, given that this is a Russian-language patch, I think it would have been more appropriate to spell all the names with the Cyrillic alphabet, as "Барратт" and "Симонйи".

That's actually common practice. NASA did it for Russian cosmonauts who flew on the shuttle (their names were in cyrillic). The notion being that they use the alphabet of the originating crewmember.

For example:

201px-Sts-111-patch.png

The other important design element to note is that, in Russia, the mission commander is always centered on the patch (i.e. flanked by his crewmates) unlike the U.S. where the commander is always first (if you look through the Apollo patches when the U.S. flew 3 man missions you will see this consistently).

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