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Are there any reasons to use raster images over vector images?


Quillz

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It seems to me that when designing a new logo, there's little reason not to do it with some kind of vector-editing program, like Inkscape or Illustrator. You can easily export it into a raster format like .png, and vector images, being based on math, seem to take up less space than raster images, too.

But, surely there are some reasons for working with raster images, right?

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Saving images for the web would be one use.

Well, yes this is true, but you can always just export a vector image into a raster format like .png.

Here's an example... There are a lot of templates posted here. Some are in .psd and others are in .ai. It just seems like it's always better to work with the .ai template because then it's virtually infinitely scalable and can be easily exported into another format.

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Saving images for the web would be one use.

Well, yes this is true, but you can always just export a vector image into a raster format like .png.

If you export it to raster, you're working with raster.

Another use? Photo retouching. Image adjustments (red eye, color, etc.) are better suited for raster programs like Photoshop.

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when designing a logo (i assume we are talking about logos specifically) id would almost always use a vector based program to do that.

* all artwork is scalable (retaining infinite resolution) whilst remaining the same file size.

* recolouring/ any sort of editing of the original image is far simpler.

* its just far easier to design in vector. i understand from a novice point of view, everyone has photoshop or something, but they are slow

and cumbersome and not built for the job. these are programs designed for high end photo-manipulation. they can deal better with vector

art now however.

theres no excuse to be using paint when stuff like gimp and inkscape are free and easy to learn.

the only program that properly deal with both is adobe after effects, but thats a whole nother kettle of fish.

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