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changing pics to 300 dpi


nickelcat15

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I do not have photoshop. Everything is 96 or 92 dpi.

Which program are you using? If it's Photoshop, check under Image Size and it should tell you the resolution. You can scale down, but not up. If you've done everything in 72 dpi and up it to 300, you're up the creek.
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You might be able to "upsize" the resolution of the image. You haven't said how big your 96 dpi image is, or what size the final output is going to be.

If you have a digital photo that is 96 dpi, but 24" x 24", you can easily upsize the resolution to 300dpi if the image is printing 8" x 8". It's all math. Whatever percentage you increase the resolution (3 times, in this case), you divide by the same amount to get the adjusted size with the correct resolution.

So, a 24" image at 96 dpi becomes an 8" image at 300 dpi.

It's all because the pixels are smaller at a higher resolution.

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What is it being used for? The other thing is what is the highest res of the printer, if it's not more than 200 dpi, then 300 would be pointless. If you have 92 dpi image and it's clean and at the size it's suppose to be, why would you want to increase the file size if you could change it to 300 dpi? If the 92 dpi image will print fine, then you don't need to increase the dpi.

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Another little trick is if you are doing large format (van graphics) or grand format (billboards) you usually can get away with doubling the dpi or the overall size of the document if you have a high quality high dpi image to start with.

Also, turn off resample image when you play around with dpi. I'll shrink/increase the size but it won't create new pixels...and that's what's so bad about increasing the size willy nilly. Photoshop has to come up with those pixels somehow and its making them up, which is never a good thing unless you have a giant solid black box...and even then you might get some bad pixelation.

I know alot of people say "DON'T INCREASE IT AT ALL!" but in all honesty...you can get away with a little. Especially if its printing at a small size or if you're viewing distance is far away. After you've messed with size, always view it in "Actual Pixels" zoom, this will give you the best look at how that bad that thing is going to look printed...

Basically....whatever you do, don't open up a web image and in Image size write in 300 instead of 72 and think it will be fine. Its along the same lines as taking a web logo and throwing EPS as the extension and thinking that you can cut vinyl or have a usable image...photoshop is awesome...but its not magic.

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Along the lines of what Pat said, you can increase, but don't do it all at once. Because Photoshop makes new pixels, it's always best to go up in small increments to the size you need the graphic to be. I usually (if I have to) go up in roughly 15% increments until I reach the size it needs to be. For example, if I start with a 100 DPI image, I gradually increase the resolution in this order: 100 -> 115 -> 133 -> 153 -> 175 -> 200 -> 230 -> 265 -> 300. I know it seems tedious, but this will generally give you a better result than going directly from 100 to 300 dpi.

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That's a good point. I was just thinking of the first time I did a CD cover at 72 dpi and tried to make it 300. Needless to say, I started over from scratch.

I printed a CD cover in 88 dpi, because when I held a sample CD cover against the screen, it was the same size.

I've learned a lot since then.

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