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Best Hall of Fame?


hubsportsfan17

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well, i've only been to two, the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto and the one in Kingston. Gotta say I enjoyed the HHOF, but its been ages since I've been there. I want to see Cooperstown thought. The Kingston hall was really nice, not as grand a Hall as in Toronto, but it was good for looking back at the old days of hockey

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I've only been to copperstown and the NCAA "Hall of Champions" in Indy. Cooperstown was awesome. I can't imagine the others topping it. the Hall of champions was pretty cool, but it was more celebrating college athletics as opposed to the individual athletes. But it was still nice.

peace,

pc

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I've only been to Cooperstown, but from what I've seen in pictures, it definitely has the best atmosphere. Springfield is a dump, Canton seems more like a big suburb, and Toronto is a big metropolis. But when you go to Cooperstown, you know it's a baseball area. There's nothing else around, except a few microbreweries, the Soccer Hall of Fame, and some Amish-type septic trucks pulled by horses.

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I've been to Cooperstown once, and the Hockey Hall of Fame too many times to count.

My favourite of the two was the HHOF, but I should note that my only visit to Cooperstown was as a 10 year old, so I likely wouldn't have appreciated it as much as I would now.

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Cooperstown, it was the first hall of fame. I've met people who don't know a thing about baseball who love Cooperstown just for the atmosphere. But at the moment cooperstown's Baseball HOF is undergoing renovations, so only a quarter of the hall is open. But if we assumed everything was 100% (which it will be soon), then the Baseball HOF has no challengers.

Baseball is the greatest sport (sorry Hockey/Football/Soccer/Basketball/etc. fans), so of course, the Baseball HOF is the greatest HOF. But it would win even if I hated baseball, simply because it's in a small town. The Baseball HOF is on a nice main street USA. The Hockey hall of fame is in a city, instant loss of points. The Football Hall of Fame is by a highway, triple loss of points. But the Baseball hall of fame is nice and nestled in a great cornerstone of America.

(BTW, Baseball wasn't invented in Cooperstown, it was invented in New York, but who'd really want to have the Baseball hall of fame in Brooklyn?)

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actually there was a report that some town in Penn. had a rule on their records about not playing "town-ball" within the area around the town hall.

My info probably isn't 100 percent (location), but I know this discovery pre-dated all previous knowledge of the orgins of Modern Baseball by years. In addition to this, there are written stories throughout the early 1800s of this game town-ball.

Anyhoo, the fact is nobody really knows where it was invented, but the story of Cooperstown is appealing.

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cooperstown is great, they got that field, great stuff to look at, a lot of cool restaraunts, and a cute little town. Canton, Ive been to three times, it was built in the late sixtys so it has this late sixtys early seventys feeling to it, and it is right off the highway, but they have really cool things like this big clear wall that has every teams record from every year since the merger, helmets from every team that you can put on and get your picture taken, a lot of jerseys from record breaking games, I got my picture taken next to Corey Dillon's jersey last time I was there, it has since been replaced by Jamal lewis. Canton was fun, but Cooperstown was two times better.

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actually there was a report that some town in Penn. had a rule on their records about not playing "town-ball" within the area around the town hall.

Actually, the town in question is Pittsfield, Massachusetts. In May, officials in the town revealed the discovery of a civic ordinance that had been passed in 1791. The by-law prohibited anyone from playing baseball within 80 yards of Pittsfield's new meeting house. It was meant to protect the building's windows from being broken.

The ordinance barred the playing of "any game of wicket, cricket, baseball, batball football, cats, fives, or any other game played with ball" within eighty yards of the structure.

The unearthed by-law represents the first documented instance of the game of baseball being referred to by that name on the North American continent. Further, the game of baseball that is mentioned in the law is differentiated from other bat-and-ball games of the era, such as wicket, cricket and batball.

Brian in Boston

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