Jump to content

Carpenter's Bar & Grille!


DCarp1231

Recommended Posts

I've always thought I have a knack for cooking and recently I have taken culinary school into consideration in hopes of one day opening a restaurant. First off I'd like to say I made these entirely in Microsoft Word (I'm not very skilled in photoshop or anything like that) so it's pretty basic to say the least. As far as what I was limited with, I am happy with the result. Although, I feel like something is missing... Anyway...

May I present.......


BarGrille_zpsgzcztvhy.png


but then I got thinking... I'm really only good at making sanwiches so I made this one....

Sandwiches_zps3plzlrfw.png



And if you are wondering, Carpenter is my last name.

Any ideas on what I could do to make the logo better?



Link to comment
Share on other sites

Congrats on the culinary school! I've always wanted to be better at cooking. Good start on the logo too, it's got that classic diner vibe.

Some feedback:

Kill the arch on the "Carpenter" text. It's throwing off the the connection points between the letters. It's also not the most legible font, so distorting it only makes it harder to read.

The outline on the font is getting wonky as well. Instead of outlining the whole script, it's doing each letter which is highlighting the connection points in the script, which you shouldn't be able to see.

I'd reduce the number of outlines on the circle as well, and make the ones you keep thicker.

Lastly, I'd consider removing the Est. 2015 part. For me, those dates are cool if a place is super old because it shows heritage, but if it's brand new its a bit of a turn off.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Changes:

-New Fonts

-No more arch

-One circle outline

Updated Logos:

BarGrilleNew_zpsethxlzv0.png

SandwichesNew_zps1bp9hc6p.png

I thought maybe the slant was too much so I decided to make the lettering straight to see how it looks:

BarGrilleNew2_zps2r16vugd.png

SandwichesNew2_zps82utfi3r.png

There's still a lot of negative space (at least that's what I see) anymore suggestions on how I should fix that or any other improvements I could make?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe lose the circle all together, unless you have your heart set on it. If you want to keep it, don't be afraid to let "Carpenter" extend past the edges of it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

New Designs-

"Reverse Night Life"

BarGrilleNew6_zps5iaej9kk.png

SandwichesNew6_zpscnzwlj3u.png

"Beach Front"

BarGrilleNew7_zpsgyjnycpk.png

SandwichesNew7_zpsn75t2buy.png

"Night On The Beach"

BarGrilleNew8_zpspjtfh5f3.png

SandwichesNew8_zpsxnobimnb.png

Personally, I think all of the designs in this post are better than the previous designs. As you can probably tell, I like simplicity. Any C&C on making it better?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Keep trying new fonts. DaFont or FontSquirrel have a ton of free ones to try. It usually takes me around 10-20 fonts before I either find a match or give up for the day. Remember this is something that not only has to be legible in multiple mediums (signs, menus, business cards, etc) but memorable. Lowercase Impact is easy to read but not very imaginative. It doesn't need a lot of flavor, however, so find your happy middle ground and don't settle!
  • Focus on clarity and don't use a shape. Try making just "Carpenter" look good -- and don't use any stroke, or effects, etc. Just concentrate on making the words themselves legible and representative of your establishment alone, before employing any other polish.
  • Speaking of "Carpenter," I would clarify your business name further by calling it "Carpenter's." That way it's indicative of ownership in addition to clarifying that you are not, in fact, a wood-worker, regardless of the sandwich fine print.

What I always tell people (and this is from a novice designer) is to make a pageful of designs. I'm talking around at least 10-15 concepts. All different sizes, shapes, fonts, colors, etc. Use adobe's color site to try different color combos out: https://color.adobe.com/explore/most-popular/?time=all

Good luck, and keep posting your ideas.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Keep trying new fonts. DaFont or FontSquirrel have a ton of free ones to try. It usually takes me around 10-20 fonts before I either find a match or give up for the day. Remember this is something that not only has to be legible in multiple mediums (signs, menus, business cards, etc) but memorable. Lowercase Impact is easy to read but not very imaginative. It doesn't need a lot of flavor, however, so find your happy middle ground and don't settle!
  • Focus on clarity and don't use a shape. Try making just "Carpenter" look good -- and don't use any stroke, or effects, etc. Just concentrate on making the words themselves legible and representative of your establishment alone, before employing any other polish.
  • Speaking of "Carpenter," I would clarify your business name further by calling it "Carpenter's." That way it's indicative of ownership in addition to clarifying that you are not, in fact, a wood-worker, regardless of the sandwich fine print.

What I always tell people (and this is from a novice designer) is to make a pageful of designs. I'm talking around at least 10-15 concepts. All different sizes, shapes, fonts, colors, etc. Use adobe's color site to try different color combos out: https://color.adobe.com/explore/most-popular/?time=all

Good luck, and keep posting your ideas.</p>

Thanks for the feedback! Being that I am limited to MS word, what fonts do you suggest I use? And yes I do agree, I should call it "Carpenter's". It does sound better and seems to roll off the tongue smoother than "Carpenter"
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Keep trying new fonts. DaFont or FontSquirrel have a ton of free ones to try. It usually takes me around 10-20 fonts before I either find a match or give up for the day. Remember this is something that not only has to be legible in multiple mediums (signs, menus, business cards, etc) but memorable. Lowercase Impact is easy to read but not very imaginative. It doesn't need a lot of flavor, however, so find your happy middle ground and don't settle!
  • Focus on clarity and don't use a shape. Try making just "Carpenter" look good -- and don't use any stroke, or effects, etc. Just concentrate on making the words themselves legible and representative of your establishment alone, before employing any other polish.
  • Speaking of "Carpenter," I would clarify your business name further by calling it "Carpenter's." That way it's indicative of ownership in addition to clarifying that you are not, in fact, a wood-worker, regardless of the sandwich fine print.

What I always tell people (and this is from a novice designer) is to make a pageful of designs. I'm talking around at least 10-15 concepts. All different sizes, shapes, fonts, colors, etc. Use adobe's color site to try different color combos out: https://color.adobe.com/explore/most-popular/?time=all

Good luck, and keep posting your ideas.</p>

Thanks for the feedback! Being that I am limited to MS word, what fonts do you suggest I use? And yes I do agree, I should call it "Carpenter's". It does sound better and seems to roll off the tongue smoother than "Carpenter"

I've always liked Pacifico for food-related scripts, but everybody's got their favorites. There's honestly so many out there that it's hard to say.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Beach Front"

SandwichesNew7_zpsn75t2buy.png

I really like this one. I think if you ditched the gradient and made the lines a little bolder, you'd have something amazing. I Can't believe these were all designed in MS Word so props for that!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Back with new designs!

I went through multiple fonts suggested by CS85, but none really fit the style I was looking for and ultimately decided to keep the original fonts

Changes:

- Rebranded to "carpenter's"

- Ditched the gradient

- 3 to 1 seagulls

- text over sun

BarGrille9_zpsc8ivohhh.png

Sandwiches9_zps7xec0dfv.png

Along with these changes, I also experimented with a new color scheme:

BarGrille10_zpsnur7ovst.png

Sandwiches10_zpsyv9ltyi1.png

I initially changed the blue to red to match the border, but it didn't look right.

I think I'm finally on to something... thoughts?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If that's the case, then the general rule of creating a logo is to begin with a one-color logo, then add colors later. Since you prospectively want this to be featured on signage and other mediums, you need a quick distinct logo for people to recognize. Say you're driving down the road, you need those drivers to quickly read and see the name.

With that being said, using my personal branding logo as a template, I made a quick mockup for you.

24xp82d.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you'd like me to, sure I could. Not to discount any work you've done, which is actually great for using Word, but if you'd like me to help you finalize a design, feel free to PM me and let me know.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I took your word and created a one-color logo. I found it hard to use the square because it felt empty. With that being said, I took away the square completey. Almost every restaurant has something in the logo that makes them distinct... McDonald's (golden arches), Arby's (hat), Applebee's (apple), etc. I have decided my logo "staple" will be a seagull.

Update

With seagull(s)-

BarGrille11_zpswtjsqndq.png

BarGrille14_zpssx4snyal.png

Without seagull-

BarGrille12_zpsl6o3fhmp.png

BarGrille13_zpsqbr5lzqm.png

Thoughts?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not bad. As I previously mentioned, I'd remove the stroke on the second line of type and make it a solid color, then I feel like number 1 there may be a winner.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.