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Question about scanners


Shumway

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With my birthday coming up this week(Wednesday), I'm probably going to be using my money to purchase a scanner. I'm probably looking to get a combo thingy because I don't have a printer or anything. I'm a little low on funds, so I'm hopefully going to stay cheap on this. Basically, what I need to know is about the PPM. I see some scanner/printer/copier combos for like $90 with 22ppm. Is that high enough? I'm assuming the higher the ppm, the better it will be, but is somewhere around 20-22 high enough, or do I want something better? Any help would be appreciated.

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Yes. PPM is pages per minute, and it's an approximate range. It simply refers to how fast the machine prints. I don't know about you, but it holds no bearing on my purchase decisions. Obviously, if it's important to you, you'd get a laser printer, because it's much faster than an inkjet, but the cheapest color lasers run about $300.

Anyway, for your inquiry, I reccommend the HP PSC 1500 Series (I think I have a 1510). It's a printer/scanner/copier, and it performs very well as a recreational printing and scanning device. It's fast, compatible with both Apple and IBM, has great inkjet print quality, and it's $99.

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And here I thought PPM was pixels per something with an M...millimeter? Anyways, my parents got me a scanner, which I received today. It's an HP 4370. It's not a combo, but I'm fine without a printer for now. Within the next few weeks I'll start scanning in old sketches and making them into concepts. I still need to find a bunch of my drawings though. Thanks for all your help guys.

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yes ppm refers to points per millimeter, but more often, here in the US you'll see ppi - points per inch

Actually the measurement used for the quality of a printout is dpi - which refers to dots per inch. The higher the dpi the better quality your print out. When working with a scanner though dpi is not much of an issue. Scanners topped out long ago when it comes to dpi because your not getting any type of hardcopy output with a scanner there was no need to go much higher on the dpi. With a scanner your more concerned with the electronic output (or the image file) that you have after a scan, any scanner today that you purchase (as long as you spend at least $80 US or so will give you photo quality scans.

If you do decide in the future to go with a MFP (the mulitifunction devices that Scan and Print) then you'll need to ring dpi into your thought process.

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I'm a huge fan of Hewlitt-Packard (hp) printers and products. They have never let me down. I just bought the HP 6210 All-In-One which faxes, scans and prints for less than $200. It's usually a good idea to check epinions.com when making these types of purchases. Good luck.

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