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Scores rebranding?


reppact

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Passed the new Scores Chicken and Ribs restaurant in downtown Montreal and noticed the new signage:

splash_ontario.gif

This was the old signage:

splash_quebec.gif

I went to the website and saw that the "new" logo may have been in Ontario all along, is this the case, or was it a recent change? Either way the new signage is ALOT better.

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I agree that it's better, but isn't Quebec trying to remove all English from its localities?

If you mean the "Rotisserie and Ribs" part then it isn't allowed, it would be the french equivalent from the old signage " Rotisserie et Cotes leeves" If you mean overall, if the company has a trademarked name and its English (McDonalds) it id allowed. Unless the company rebrands a Quebec version of the name. Examples: Shoppers Drug Mart= Pharmaprix; Mark's Work Wearhouse= L'Équipeur; Audiotronic= Dumoulin

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I agree that it's better, but isn't Quebec trying to remove all English from its localities?

If you mean the "Rotisserie and Ribs" part then it isn't allowed, it would be the french equivalent from the old signage " Rotisserie et Cotes leeves" If you mean overall, if the company has a trademarked name and its English (McDonalds) it id allowed. Unless the company rebrands a Quebec version of the name. Examples: Shoppers Drug Mart= Pharmaprix; Mark's Work Wearhouse= L'Équipeur; Audiotronic= Dumoulin

Was this in Quebec that you saw the sign that you posted? It sounded like the sign you saw was in English (the first one posted), that maybe the language of the "Rotisserie and Ribs" changed as well as the logo. Either way, thank you for clearing that up.

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I agree that it's better, but isn't Quebec trying to remove all English from its localities?

If you mean the "Rotisserie and Ribs" part then it isn't allowed, it would be the french equivalent from the old signage " Rotisserie et Cotes leeves" If you mean overall, if the company has a trademarked name and its English (McDonalds) it id allowed. Unless the company rebrands a Quebec version of the name. Examples: Shoppers Drug Mart= Pharmaprix; Mark's Work Wearhouse= L'Équipeur; Audiotronic= Dumoulin

Was this in Quebec that you saw the sign that you posted? It sounded like the sign you saw was in English (the first one posted), that maybe the language of the "Rotisserie and Ribs" changed as well as the logo. Either way, thank you for clearing that up.

Yeah I saw it in Montreal. And the English wording was in French.

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So in Quebec the right of free speech is apparently restricted. Swell.

I was going to go into an extremely long dissertation about the Quebec French-only sign law, the fact that Commercial signage in Quebec has to be a full 50% larger than 'Foreign language' signage, and the problems it has posed for the last 30 some years, but it is easier if I post a link.

Click here

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The government immediately invoked the notwithstanding clause, a clause within the Canadian constitution that allows the use of unconstitutional laws for a period of 5 years.

WTF? "It's directly contrary to our national constitution, but we'll let you get away with it for the next five years..." What Canadian whacko dreamt up THAT concept?

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The government immediately invoked the notwithstanding clause, a clause within the Canadian constitution that allows the use of unconstitutional laws for a period of 5 years.

WTF? "It's directly contrary to our national constitution, but we'll let you get away with it for the next five years..." What Canadian whacko dreamt up THAT concept?

Somebody who doesn't want Bloc Quebecois to attempt to leave the country again.

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