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Who does uni QC?


BlueSky

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We've seen numerous goofs, misspellings, etc. through the years, backwards logos, all kinds of stuff. So my question to anyone who knows for sure is, do teams have someone in charge of visual QC? If so, who is it?

I really don't understand how somebody, even the person who sewed it, doesn't see these things, doesn't for example hold up Mark Ingram's jersey after doing the NOB and say, "Aw crap, that looks like INGR AM. Better fix that or somebody will be p***ed." Maybe's it's the angle, but the 'G' and 'R' even look lower, like they're ducking under the collar.

9891118-standard.jpg

Is there someone charged with looking at this stuff or do they just roll with, "Don't worry about it. Except for those clowns on the Creamer board, nobody will notice this or will care if they do." :D

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1. I believe it would be the equipment manager who would have the last check before something goes out onto the field.

2. When you have an R and an A ? almost any letter and an A, really ? because the A angles away from the other letters, it almost always looks like there's extra space there, especially if the tail of the R extends beyond the loop.

3. The G and the R are wrapping around the contours of the shoulder pads in that shot, away from the viewer. If the jersey was taken off the shoulder pads and laid out flat, my guess is that they would not look lower than the others.

Really, in theory, it would be nice if every jersey looked just it does in the style guides, but there are real-world applications and limitations that we just have to accept.

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Really, in theory, it would be nice if every jersey looked just it does in the style guides, but there are real-world applications and limitations that we just have to accept.

I agree, but when you get the "ANGEES" and the "MINNESTOA" Twins, that surprises me and I always figured there was no "final" check and they are just noticed when they are noticed. There are probably several misspelled wordmarks and NOBs that never make it out of the locker room because someone notices it, but given the number of mistakes far more aggregious than the Ingram picture, I wonder whether most teams/Equipment Managers, lack a specific process.

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1. I believe it would be the equipment manager who would have the last check before something goes out onto the field.

2. When you have an R and an A — almost any letter and an A, really — because the A angles away from the other letters, it almost always looks like there's extra space there, especially if the tail of the R extends beyond the loop.3. The G and the R are wrapping around the contours of the shoulder pads in that shot, away from the viewer. If the jersey was taken off the shoulder pads and laid out flat, my guess is that they would not look lower than the others.

Really, in theory, it would be nice if every jersey looked just it does in the style guides, but there are real-world applications and limitations that we just have to accept.

Yes, and I regret not clarifying in my original post that it's clearly more than that. You can't tell in the pic I posted because the bottom of the letters are covered. Oddly enough, though I can't find a better game pic, I can show you what it looks like. This is from a jersey sales site and this is exactly what it looks like. Doesn't that seem like abnormal spacing even given the R to A factor? If so, why in the world is it that way on his game jersey and retail versions?

New-Orleans-Saints--2328-Ingram-White-Jersey-6120-43192.jpg

Obviously it can be done...

alg_giants_ingram_seridan.jpg

...by some teams at least. Maybe you're right, 'cause Jacksonville had the same issue with Clint:

Jacksonville+Jaguars+v+Tennessee+Titans+AlMgJUig1HBl.jpg

Good point - I think BlueSky is really raising two separate issues in his original post.

That's correct.

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It's really all about the attention to detail of the sewer and how demanding the equipment manager is. The Jags and Saints' pictures look as if the sewer just placed all the letters with equal spacing between them. If you know a bit about typography (which, in my opinion, should be mandatory for an athletic sewer), you know that certain letters create extra space between their neighbors and need to be brought on closer to the adjacent letter in order for the spacing to look visually proportionate. People probably just don't care enough and think they can get by on 'good enough.' Having seen Paul Lukas' interviews with Giants' equipment manager Joe Skiba, I'm not really surprised that the Giants lettering looks well-spaced. He seems to have a better knack for the subtle details.

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