CDixonDesign

Photoshop: Overlaying Logos

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Ok guys, I can work feverishly in Illustrator like no one's business all day long, but my Photoshop skills are lacking. Photoshop gurus, i'm looking to take a logo and impose it onto a basketball.

What's the best way to "overlay" a logo onto another image?. Such as taking a logo and placing it on a golfball and the dimples show through as if it's realistic?

I want the dimples of the basketball to show through, as if the image is printed on it, any tips?

All help is greatly appreciated, and would probably help a few members here grow as Designers.

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There's no real set tutorial on this, as every logo will behave differently depending on the colors. That being said I just made a pretty quick and dirty logo on a basketball just to show you the basic technique.

Basketball.png

For this one I made two different logo layers, one for the white and one for the green, essentially. This is where mostly trial-and-error and simple playing around come in. It all really comes down to the blending on the layers. For the white layer, I selected luminosity. This darkened the green areas making the white clearly visible, then I reduced the opacity in order to let the dimples to show through.

Screenshot2012-11-08at24009PM.png

On the green layer, I set it to multiply, which basically darkens the logo and removes the white from all colors.

Screenshot2012-11-08at24019PM.png

When layered on top of each other they work together to make one complete logo. This is the absolute basics of it, but as you experiment with blending options you can get much different and better results. You can also use tools such as gaussian blur and sperize to make it look more realistic on the ball.

Hope this helps!

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Here's the method I use; First put the decal where you want it. On a sphere you may want to distort it to make it feel like it's printed on the surface. This is more if it's on the side. Something that's facing the viewer won't have as much distortion.

hUiVz.jpg

Go to the layer that has your decal. Select the decal area. Sometimes you need to everything that's not the image, then select inverse. Then go to your first layer, the one you're covering and copy the selected area into a new layer. When you place it above your decal you should see just a faint line. Desaturate the level and set it to multiply. Adjust contrast and opacity to taste.

This is what the level would look like all by it's lonesome.

HTISM.jpg

Sometimes you would need something special, not all textures would take printing the same way. and it may drop out in some area.

This is one way to do it, another is to use a layer mask on the areas you want to get rid of.

oQrlh.jpg

The result;

09gzS.jpg

Here's what the logo Jimmey64 used looks like with this method.

G0p9z.jpg

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Displacement maps are your friend. Check out the Logo's on grass thread linked above and you'll be sorted. That's where I learnt how to superimpose a logo onto a textured background and make it look genuinely convincing.

It's a multiple step process, that you'll need to tweak and adjust according to the background image to make it look real, but once you have the principles down it's fairly easy and VERY effective.

9erssteve

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Yes, displacement maps would be your most seamless approach, I did this in about a minute or two, very easy.......

BobcatsBallDisplacement.png

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-Sorry for the thread hijack. Tornado, can you check your other post about the splash screen for photoshop. Thanks!

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