NYYNYR

MLB Question/Project for ColorWerx

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Being an AL fan, I notice that most logo packages use the same generic navy blue (for a lack of a better name) when showing teams ranging from the Rays to the Tigers and Yanks.

I also see that in the NL, you have the same red shade used for the Nats/Cards/Phillies/Reds, etc. Are these the same???

To me, with the naked eye, the Yankees and Tigers use the darkest possible midnight blue, while the TB blue has an ever-so-slight purplish tinge that makes it different than a Cleveland or Minnesota navy. But I could be totally wrong...

Could you show a color progression (by league) for ...

Navy Blue

Royal Blue

Red

Brick Red

???

I think there's a sense that everything's equal (i.e. that the Rangers' blue is the same as the Royals' blue, and Dodger blue for that matter). Would you be able to actually pinpoint what specific color is used and show a "progression" from lightest to darkest. I know you either have (or know) the exact shade the teams use. Would you be able to lay them out in a graph or something?

Just curious...Sorry if this is a stupid request.

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The general answer to your question is the use of Pantone colors. Teams use Pantone colors as a standard, so you will have teams that use the same Pantone number, but they will no doubt set different RGB values. For example, Washington, Philly, and St Louis all use the same Pantone value for their red, but each team has a different set of RGB and CMYK values for their red. So if you were using Pantone swatches, all those teams would be the same, but if you used the team defined RGB values, Philly would be a bright red, Washington a strong red, and St Louis a medium/duller red. Same thing with navy, Detroit, Cleveland, St Louis, New York, Minnesota, and Boston use one Pantone value while Tampa, San Diego, and Washington use another (Milwaukee uses a different one). And once again, the team defined RGB values are different for each and every one of those teams. Also, the Rangers and Royals have the same Pantone but different RGB values, and the Dodgers use something else entirely.

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The general answer to your question is the use of Pantone colors. Teams use Pantone colors as a standard, so you will have teams that use the same Pantone number, but they will no doubt set different RGB values. For example, Washington, Philly, and St Louis all use the same Pantone value for their red, but each team has a different set of RGB and CMYK values for their red. So if you were using Pantone swatches, all those teams would be the same, but if you used the team defined RGB values, Philly would be a bright red, Washington a strong red, and St Louis a medium/duller red. Same thing with navy, Detroit, Cleveland, St Louis, New York, Minnesota, and Boston use one Pantone value while Tampa, San Diego, and Washington use another (Milwaukee uses a different one). And once again, the team defined RGB values are different for each and every one of those teams. Also, the Rangers and Royals have the same Pantone but different RGB values, and the Dodgers use something else entirely.

OK...So we pick the same Pantone but then can customize, you're saying?

So it's like you're picking generic swatches to dye a fabric, but then you're adding or subtracting a certain ingredient to make it your own?

It just seems interesting in that Cleveland's blue and Detroit's blue are not even close (Detroit's is closer to a black/ midnight blue), so I figured there was one "Cleveland shade" of medium navy and a "Detroit shade" of maximum navy/ midnight. You're saying that's not the case. I find this stuff interesting. Thank you.

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The general answer to your question is the use of Pantone colors. Teams use Pantone colors as a standard, so you will have teams that use the same Pantone number, but they will no doubt set different RGB values. For example, Washington, Philly, and St Louis all use the same Pantone value for their red, but each team has a different set of RGB and CMYK values for their red. So if you were using Pantone swatches, all those teams would be the same, but if you used the team defined RGB values, Philly would be a bright red, Washington a strong red, and St Louis a medium/duller red. Same thing with navy, Detroit, Cleveland, St Louis, New York, Minnesota, and Boston use one Pantone value while Tampa, San Diego, and Washington use another (Milwaukee uses a different one). And once again, the team defined RGB values are different for each and every one of those teams. Also, the Rangers and Royals have the same Pantone but different RGB values, and the Dodgers use something else entirely.

You're referring to those relatively new logosheets that MLB Pressbox has been providing, aren't you?

I haven't had a chance to go through these new RGB designations yet, but from my experience, too many designers who try to designate these kinds of things use RGB values from outdated sources - e.g., old Pantone swatch libraries.

Branding should include color consistency - if a team were to designate PANTONE 200 C for their Red, IMO they should use the current specs for reproducing that color. Currently, 200 C is defined in RGB (using the sRGB color space) as R:186 G:12 B:47. The CMYK version (technically, you would use PANTONE 200 CP) is C:03 M:100 Y:70 K:12. Why specify different RGB values for the same Pantone color? Why not just use a different Pantone color? If you utilize standards, you should ensure that they remain consistent in all mediums - print, video, fabrics, threads, etc.

These inconsistencies are a pet peeve of mine.

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Speaking of inconsistencies - why does my PANTONE 200 come to RGB 183, 18, 52 (CMYK 0, 90, 72, 28)? This color stuff frustrates the heck out of me.

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Speaking of inconsistencies - why does my PANTONE 200 come to RGB 183, 18, 52 (CMYK 0, 90, 72, 28)? This color stuff frustrates the heck out of me.

You may be using an outdated Pantone color library. Especially if you are using Illustrator. Even CS5 isn't up to date, normally. That's the reason ColorWerx posts "RGB Color Corrected" graphics all the time.

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Speaking of inconsistencies - why does my PANTONE 200 come to RGB 183, 18, 52 (CMYK 0, 90, 72, 28)? This color stuff frustrates the heck out of me.

You may be using an outdated Pantone color library. Especially if you are using Illustrator. Even CS5 isn't up to date, normally. That's the reason ColorWerx posts "RGB Color Corrected" graphics all the time.

I've been scrounging for the correct numbers for some time now - using the DigitalColor Meter on my MacBook isn't doing much justice, and neither is the internet. While the color-corrected graphics help in some ways, I'm still stuck when creating the uniform graphics for the main site here. All I want is an easy solution.

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The general answer to your question is the use of Pantone colors. Teams use Pantone colors as a standard, so you will have teams that use the same Pantone number, but they will no doubt set different RGB values. For example, Washington, Philly, and St Louis all use the same Pantone value for their red, but each team has a different set of RGB and CMYK values for their red. So if you were using Pantone swatches, all those teams would be the same, but if you used the team defined RGB values, Philly would be a bright red, Washington a strong red, and St Louis a medium/duller red. Same thing with navy, Detroit, Cleveland, St Louis, New York, Minnesota, and Boston use one Pantone value while Tampa, San Diego, and Washington use another (Milwaukee uses a different one). And once again, the team defined RGB values are different for each and every one of those teams. Also, the Rangers and Royals have the same Pantone but different RGB values, and the Dodgers use something else entirely.

You're referring to those relatively new logosheets that MLB Pressbox has been providing, aren't you?

I haven't had a chance to go through these new RGB designations yet, but from my experience, too many designers who try to designate these kinds of things use RGB values from outdated sources - e.g., old Pantone swatch libraries.

Branding should include color consistency - if a team were to designate PANTONE 200 C for their Red, IMO they should use the current specs for reproducing that color. Currently, 200 C is defined in RGB (using the sRGB color space) as R:186 G:12 B:47. The CMYK version (technically, you would use PANTONE 200 CP) is C:03 M:100 Y:70 K:12. Why specify different RGB values for the same Pantone color? Why not just use a different Pantone color? If you utilize standards, you should ensure that they remain consistent in all mediums - print, video, fabrics, threads, etc.

These inconsistencies are a pet peeve of mine.

Oh I agree with you, I was just telling it as it is. I think there are many teams that should change their Pantone colors to better reflect their uniforms and merchandise etc. It seems like teams try to conform to a predefined set of Pantones to pick from. Like if your a navy team, your probably gonna be 282 or 289 (or if your really dark, 5395), but thats about it. It seems like there is never much variation. Thats why I'm always kinda surprised/relieved when I see a team use a color thats not one of the "norms".

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