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BCS Buster!


pianoknight

  

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Conference winners plus top-rated 2nd-place team or top independent.

First round week after conference championship games (i.e. Dec. 8-14), second round is the big four bowl games, third round week of Jan. 8, NC game Jan. 15-ish.

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My ideal system would be a 16-team playoff, with some simple selection criteria.

1. >>>To get an automatic berth, a team MUST win their conference AND be in the final Top 25 Rankings.

(This prevents fringe teams like Arizona or Texas from getting edged out by a 6-5 Troy or East Carolina.)

2. >>>The remaining slots are filled using At-Large Teams, in order from the final Top 25 Rankings.

Here's a shakedown of what would have happened using LAST year's rankings:

1. Alabama (SEC Champ)

2. Texas (Big 12 Champ)

3. Florida*

4. Boise State (WAC Champ)

5. Ohio State (Big Ten Champ)

6. TCU (Mountain West Champ)

7. Iowa*

8. Cincinnati (Big East Champ)

9. Penn State*

10. Virginia Tech*

11. Oregon (Pac 10 Champ)

12. BYU*

13. Georgia Tech (ACC Champ)

14. Nebraska*

15. Pitt*

16. Wisconsin

17. LSU

18. Utah

19. Miami

20. Ole Miss

21. Texas Tech

22. USC

23. Central Michigan (MAC Champ)

The NINE conference winners that made the Top 25 are automatically in, and the remaining 7 slots are given to the top At-Large teams remaining. The whole playoff is seeded based on BCS Rank. I think the law of average would pretty much dictate that generally, the top 10 teams are guaranteed entry into the playoffs. You'll notice that by barely sneaking onto the list, Central Michigan also denied a spot to Wisconsin, who would have been next up. Normally, once a team gets 3 or 4 losses, they tend to write off the season and just hope to make a bowl game. This system gives them reason to finish strong, even if they had a rocky start. As a fan, I specifically remember Nebraska had 4 losses last year. But because two of them were 1-point nailbiters against Texas and Virginia Tech (also in the playoffs), NU is still ranked high enough to make the cut.

Because of this fact, I think that it would encourage teams to schedule tougher opponents and/or join a stronger conference. Sure, Boise and TCU still got into the tournament, but the BigTen got 3 teams in play, which obviously gives that conference a better chance to win the title.

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What I propose is something along the lines of the UEFA Champions' League:

  • Scrap the nonconference preseason, or at least limit it to 1-2 "tuneup" games per team per season, or one tuneup game and one midseason game vs. an independent team, so that the entire regular season and all conference championship games are done by Thanksgiving weekend. Teams can schedule creampuffs to their hearts' content and it has no bearing on their national title chances.
  • All conference champs plus a few at-large teams, for a total of 16 teams, qualify for the "Champions' League" to be played in December and January.
  • The defending national champs get one of the at-large berths if they haven't already qualified as a conference champion.
  • Up to two indie teams can also get at-large berths, provided they win a minimum of eight non-overtime games and nine overall. (If more than two indie teams meet this standard, two are selected by random draw.)
  • The remaining at-large berths are awarded by a random draw of all conference second-place teams. (Yes, this means that a team like Nevada could get in while a Florida or LSU doesn't. If Florida or LSU don't like that, they should have won their conference. I consider second-place teams in the Champions' League to be a necessary evil to bring the field up to 16 teams, and nothing more.)
  • The 16 teams are divided into four groups of four. The group-stage games would all be considered bowl games, so the groups would be structured so that each one contains at least one traditional bowl matchup. (For example, one group would always have the Big Ten and Pac-10 champs together, and their group-stage game would be played as the Rose Bowl.) The other two teams in each group would be placed by random draw.
  • Each team plays a single round-robin within each group. The first-place teams advance to the national semifinals. Head-to-head is the first and only tiebreaker.
  • From then on it is a straight "knockout" format: two semifinals and a national championship game.

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Keep the current system.

Call me crazy, but I kinda like it that having one loss greatly hinders your chances of playing for the national championship. And some conference are more equal than others...that's life.

I would argue that with a tourney of 16 or fewer teams it would. I guess some powerhouses would be able to withstand one loss, but right now OSU and Alabama, for example, would be one loss away from being essentially out. The games would still be huge, way bigger than in any other sport.

For an 8-team tourney, go top 8 BCS, the recent OSU and Alabama losses would be huge.

I'd prefer a 16-team tourney...11 conference winners and five at large based on BCS. Almost any game involving any ranked team would be meaningful.

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Keep the current system.

Call me crazy, but I kinda like it that having one loss greatly hinders your chances of playing for the national championship. And some conference are more equal than others...that's life.

I would argue that with a tourney of 16 or fewer teams it would. I guess some powerhouses would be able to withstand one loss, but right now OSU and Alabama, for example, would be one loss away from being essentially out. The games would still be huge, way bigger than in any other sport.

For an 8-team tourney, go top 8 BCS, the recent OSU and Alabama losses would be huge.

I'd prefer a 16-team tourney...11 conference winners and five at large based on BCS. Almost any game involving any ranked team would be meaningful.

11 might be better, give the five best conference champs a bye. It's not like any major team will gripe about missing the postseason because they're undefeated.
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Keep the current system.

Call me crazy, but I kinda like it that having one loss greatly hinders your chances of playing for the national championship. And some conference are more equal than others...that's life.

I would argue that with a tourney of 16 or fewer teams it would. I guess some powerhouses would be able to withstand one loss, but right now OSU and Alabama, for example, would be one loss away from being essentially out. The games would still be huge, way bigger than in any other sport.

For an 8-team tourney, go top 8 BCS, the recent OSU and Alabama losses would be huge.

I'd prefer a 16-team tourney...11 conference winners and five at large based on BCS. Almost any game involving any ranked team would be meaningful.

After looking at the past 6-7 seasons and the final BCS standings that went with them....the top-16 featured numerous 3-loss teams, and the top-8 featuring a handful of 2-loss teams.

So, no, one loss isn't all that crushing.

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Keep the current system.

Call me crazy, but I kinda like it that having one loss greatly hinders your chances of playing for the national championship. And some conference are more equal than others...that's life.

Agree...I like it the way it is...leave it alone, just start naming the bowl better.

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I really liked some of Viper's ideas, here's a revised version that I'd like to propose.

[*] The defending national champs get an automatic bid to a 16-team playoff.

[*] The 11 conference champs also receive an automatic bid.

[*] If the defending national champ DOES NOT win their own conference, that conference also still gets to send their champion. So last year's tournament would have included Florida (2008 Champ) and Alabama (SEC winner).

This gives us the first 11 or 12 teams, based on whether the defending champ wins their conference.

[*] The remaining 4 or 5 at-large berths are awarded from top to bottom of any remaining teams in the final BCS Ranking. This provides that "wild card" sort of option where a conference can get two, maybe even three teams in the playoffs. It also provides an option for independents like Notre Dame, without letting them play a cupcake schedule.

This format still penalizes teams for losses because typically you can't win your conference if you have 2+ losses. It also stands to reason that every undefeated and many 1-loss teams will make the cut, so having one loss won't necessarily kill your chances, unless of course you happen to lose to the eventual conference winner.

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