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Furman Paladins New Logos


Burkell007

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oof, thats rough. im seeing so many details that show it was built by someone who hasnt spent a lot of time in Illustrator. there are numerous craftsmanship issues. the concept of a knight-over-text is becoming a bit generic, but it fits into college sports. i imagine the school and student body will welcome the new logos

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Yep. A holy knight specifically.

Not necessarily "holy". Rather, a paladin is any heroic knight who strongly champions/defends a cause.

Now, granted, during the High to Late Middle Ages - the period of time we most often link with the classic depiction of knighthood - most causes to which a knight would pledge himself were somehow linked to religion. Further, the religious angle of a paladin's cause is often invoked because, according to legend, the Holy Roman Emperor Charlemagne's twelve most trusted warrior-advisors held the title Paladin.

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Yes, and those Paladins were said to exemplify Christian valour in battle. So while the title "paladin" can have a secular association (the RCMC teams use the name "Paladins") it's still a term that has an overwhelmingly religious connotation.

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Yes, and those Paladins were said to exemplify Christian valour in battle. So while the title "paladin" can have a secular association (the RCMC teams use the name "Paladins") it's still a term that has an overwhelmingly religious connotation.

"[O]verwhelmingly"? Not even close. At best, you'd be lucky to find that a third to a half of modern reference texts give primary weight to a definition of paladin that revolves around Charlemagne's twelve peers or a religious connotation. Rather, better than half of such texts will list a primary definition that speaks to a paladin simply being a heroic champion and/or strong supporter of a cause.

To that point, Furman University was founded as a Baptist theological institute and men's academy, but not even as a school with overtly Christian roots does it make the religious connotation of its athletic teams' nickname the focal point of said sobriquet's meaning. Rather, the school cites the American Heritage College Dictionary's listing, which accords the "12 peers of French emperor Charlemagne's court" definition quatemary standing, after "paragon of chivalry", "a heroic champion", and "a strong supporter or defender of a cause".

The religious connotation of the word paladin has fallen away over time, with the secular definition being the more prevalent today.

All of that being said, the logo of Furman's Paladin mascot - which was unveiled on September 14, 2103 - is not replacing the school's iconic "Diamond F" logo. Rather, it is meant to be used as a complimentary mark to the "Diamond F", which will continue to serve as the athletic department's primary logo.

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Ehh, religious knights (as opposed to the pretentious dicks that predominate tabletop RPGs) is what Furman is going for.

They even used to be called the "Christian Knights" until enough people pointed out how it could be used in a certain....unfortunate....acronym.

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Ehh, religious knights (as opposed to the pretentious dicks that predominate tabletop RPGs) is what Furman is going for. They even used to be called the "Christian Knights" until enough people pointed out how it could be used in a certain....unfortunate....acronym.

The apocryphal Furman University Christian Knights story has been debunked.

http://www.snopes.com/college/admin/furman.asp

One of my best friends - a Furman alumnus who still works closely with the athletic department - says that the Christain definition of the Paladin name was never played-up during his time at the school.

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Yes, and those Paladins were said to exemplify Christian valour in battle. So while the title "paladin" can have a secular association (the RCMC teams use the name "Paladins") it's still a term that has an overwhelmingly religious connotation.

"[O]verwhelmingly"? Not even close. At best, you'd be lucky to find that a third to a half of modern reference texts give primary weight to a definition of paladin that revolves around Charlemagne's twelve peers or a religious connotation. Rather, better than half of such texts will list a primary definition that speaks to a paladin simply being a heroic champion and/or strong supporter of a cause.

The connotation I'm most familiar with when it comes to historic works depicts the paladin as a knight in service to a religeous cause.

Most references to Charlemagne's Paladins I've seen make it a point to emphasize them as examples of Chistian martial valour, specifically in opposition to Muslim forces.

I'm not denying that "Paladin" has evolved to mean knights who champion any noble cause. I'm just saying that, in my experience, the vast majority of historical references I've seen indicate a religeous connotation.

(by the way, this is a much more pleasant discussion then what was going on in the Browns thread :D )

Anyway the logos. I like them well enough. The one with the wordmark looks a bit formulaic, but I'm a sucker for well done knight imagery.

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