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Canadian College Sports


mjrbaseball

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The CIS (Canadian Interuniversity Sport) consists of universities and the CCAA (Canadian Colleges Athletic Association) consists of colleges. Believe it or not, there is a distinction between the two over here.

This link may help many of us who are confused about the distinctions and confusions between the two...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/College#Unive...es_and_colleges

"Canada

In Canada, the term "college" usually refers to a technical, applied arts, or applied science school. These are post-secondary diploma-granting institutions, but they are not universities, and typically do not grant degrees. In Quebec, it can refer in particular to CEGEP (Collège d'enseignement général et professionnel, "college of general and professional education"), a form of post-secondary education specific to the Quebec education system that is required in order to continue onto university, or to learn a trade.

The Royal Military College of Canada is a full-fledged degree-granting university, but does not follow the naming convention used by the rest of the country.

The term "college" also applies to separate entities within a university (usually referred to as "affiliated colleges" and "federated colleges"), akin to the residential colleges in the United Kingdom. These colleges act independently, but in affiliation or federation with the university that actually grants the degrees. For example, Trinity College was once an independent institution, but later became federated with the University of Toronto, and is now one of its residential colleges.

It should be noted that, unlike in the United States, there is a strong distinction between "college" and "university" in Canada. In conversation one specifically would say either "I'm going to university" (suggesting a traditional four-year university) or "I'm going to college" (suggesting a technical or career college)."

... and on that note: Western Ontario 70, Toronto 1 :wacko:

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The CIS (Canadian Interuniversity Sport) consists of universities and the CCAA (Canadian Colleges Athletic Association) consists of colleges. Believe it or not, there is a distinction between the two over here.

This link may help many of us who are confused about the distinctions and confusions between the two...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/College#Unive...es_and_colleges

"Canada

In Canada, the term "college" usually refers to a technical, applied arts, or applied science school. These are post-secondary diploma-granting institutions, but they are not universities, and typically do not grant degrees. In Quebec, it can refer in particular to CEGEP (Collège d'enseignement général et professionnel, "college of general and professional education"), a form of post-secondary education specific to the Quebec education system that is required in order to continue onto university, or to learn a trade.

The Royal Military College of Canada is a full-fledged degree-granting university, but does not follow the naming convention used by the rest of the country.

The term "college" also applies to separate entities within a university (usually referred to as "affiliated colleges" and "federated colleges"), akin to the residential colleges in the United Kingdom. These colleges act independently, but in affiliation or federation with the university that actually grants the degrees. For example, Trinity College was once an independent institution, but later became federated with the University of Toronto, and is now one of its residential colleges.

It should be noted that, unlike in the United States, there is a strong distinction between "college" and "university" in Canada. In conversation one specifically would say either "I'm going to university" (suggesting a traditional four-year university) or "I'm going to college" (suggesting a technical or career college)."

So thats why babydoll always says university. I thought it was cause she is craaaaaaazy.

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Thank you, this is helpful. I think I understand.

A follow-up, s'il vous plait. What is «Cégep»? I see the name a lot but I don't remember it from my French studies at "University". :) And it doesn't appear in the lexicons.

(In case you are wondering, I am creating a listing/database of all higher schools in the U.S.A. and Canada that have sports, for reference and possible future projects.)

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Thank you, this is helpful. I think I understand.

A follow-up, s'il vous pla*t. What is «Cégep»? I see the name a lot but I don't remember it from my French studies at "University". :) And it doesn't appear in the lexicons.

(In case you are wondering, I am creating a listing/database of all higher schools in the U.S.A. and Canada that have sports, for reference and possible future projects.)

Cegep is an odd concept in North America. It like a Pre University. Quebec schools go to grade 11, and If one would like to go to university they apply to a cegep. Most cegep courses are 2 years and then you would go to university for 3 years instead of 4 years.

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Thank you, this is helpful. I think I understand.

A follow-up, s'il vous plait. What is «Cégep»? I see the name a lot but I don't remember it from my French studies at "University". :) And it doesn't appear in the lexicons.

(In case you are wondering, I am creating a listing/database of all higher schools in the U.S.A. and Canada that have sports, for reference and possible future projects.)

Cegep is an odd concept in North America. It like a Pre University. Quebec schools go to grade 11, and If one would like to go to university they apply to a cegep. Most cegep courses are 2 years and then you would go to university for 3 years instead of 4 years.

Thank you. That sounds similar to a junior college or a community college in the USA, or a branch campus college.

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I also heard in southern ontario that they play NFL rules in high school? Any truth to this?

They do a lot of weird stuff down there. Like have a black, silver, and white colour scheme for a team called the Blue Jays.

Certain colleges grant degrees, but few grant anything other than an B.A.

If you want the Canadian equivalent of the NCAA, you're looking for the CIS. Certainly nowhere near the level of support of the NCAA, but the athletes are actually quite good.

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I also heard in southern ontario that they play NFL rules in high school? Any truth to this?

They do a lot of weird stuff down there. Like have a black, silver, and white colour scheme for a team called the Blue Jays.

Boy, you got that straight. :D

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I know the college hockey league in canada folded. St Clair College is trying to play club in the US.

I was watching tv in canada and I saw a team called the Hurricanes with a gigantic U on it's helmet. Terrible knockoffs.

I think canada needs one standard playing rules ie CFL rules!

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