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Shawn Merriman Violates NFL Steroid Policy


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http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=2635475

ESPN.com news services

Chargers linebacker Shawne Merriman has been notified he will be suspended for four games for violating the NFL's steroids and related substances policy, league and team sources told ESPN's Chris Mortensen.

Merriman's positive test was "definitely for steroids ? not one of those supplement deals" said a source with knowledge of Merriman's suspension.

Merriman's suspension originally was to be announced last Tuesday when two other players -- the Falcons' Mark Lehr and the Lions' Shaun Rogers -- were suspended for violating the policy. But Merriman reserved the right to appeal his suspension, so it was not announced.

Neither the Chargers, nor Merriman, could be reached for comment Sunday night.

Merriman's suspension is the latest on a laundry list of on- and off-the-field issues coach Marty Schottenheimer has had to deal with this season.

From a strictly football standpoint, Merriman's four-game absence decimates a San Diego defense already reeling from injuries.

Linebacker Steve Foley was shot in the leg by a off-duty police officer on Sept. 3 and was subsequently placed on injured reserve. Foley's replacement, Shaun Phillips, injured his right calf in Sunday's 30-27 loss to Kansas City and will be out four to six weeks.

In addition, linebacker Igor Olshansky is out after having arthroscopic knee surgery and is likely to miss a month.

Off the field, the situation has been at least as devastating.

Safety Terrence Kiel is currently facing five felony drug charges relating to the shipping and possession of large quantities of prescription cough syrup, which is a controlled substance. Although Drug Enforcement Administration investigators said Kiel admitted he shipped at least two packages and knew of the contents, Kiel pleaded not guilty at his arraignment earlier this month.

Foley, meanwhile, has been charged with two counts of misdemeanor DUI stemming from his confrontation with an off-duty Coronado police officer.

Police said that Foley, who, according to his agent, David Levine, is currently unable to walk or stand without assistance, had been partying in downtown San Diego and registered a blood-alcohol level of .233 percent, nearly three times California's legal limit of .08 percent.

The charges carry enhancements that include being charged with DUI within 10 years of a prior conviction and having a blood-alcohol level exceeding .15.

Foley has been arrested at least five times since 1999, including cases that police say involved alcohol and confrontations with officers.

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.

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  • 2 months later...

I dug this thread up because as you might've seen, the Dolphins' Jason Taylor had some very interesting things to say today about Merriman and his questionable candidacy for postseason honors. First, here's a link to the story:

espn.com

I think Taylor's exactly right. I'm a hard-liner on the drug issue anyway, if I made the rules it would be a lifetime ban for one's second offense. Give them one chance to learn their lesson, and then lock them out forever if they make the same stupid mistake again. But regarding the story's specific point, I agree completely that anyone who tests positive should be automatically ineligible for postseason awards or even playing in the Pro Bowl that year. Some will argue about false positives--but any high level athlete, amateur or pro knows exactly what's forbidden to them, and exactly what they're putting into their body. There's too much tolerance and too many chances given to athletes using banned substances, it's well past time to bring the hammer down on them.

Agree or disagree?

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I dug this thread up because as you might've seen, the Dolphins' Jason Taylor had some very interesting things to say today about Merriman and his questionable candidacy for postseason honors. First, here's a link to the story:

espn.com

I think Taylor's exactly right. I'm a hard-liner on the drug issue anyway, if I made the rules it would be a lifetime ban for one's second offense. Give them one chance to learn their lesson, and then lock them out forever if they make the same stupid mistake again. But regarding the story's specific point, I agree completely that anyone who tests positive should be automatically ineligible for postseason awards or even playing in the Pro Bowl that year. Some will argue about false positives--but any high level athlete, amateur or pro knows exactly what's forbidden to them, and exactly what they're putting into their body. There's too much tolerance and too many chances given to athletes using banned substances, it's well past time to bring the hammer down on them.

Agree or disagree?

I'd agree, if not for the Steve Howe defense.

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I dug this thread up because as you might've seen, the Dolphins' Jason Taylor had some very interesting things to say today about Merriman and his questionable candidacy for postseason honors. First, here's a link to the story:

espn.com

I think Taylor's exactly right. I'm a hard-liner on the drug issue anyway, if I made the rules it would be a lifetime ban for one's second offense. Give them one chance to learn their lesson, and then lock them out forever if they make the same stupid mistake again. But regarding the story's specific point, I agree completely that anyone who tests positive should be automatically ineligible for postseason awards or even playing in the Pro Bowl that year. Some will argue about false positives--but any high level athlete, amateur or pro knows exactly what's forbidden to them, and exactly what they're putting into their body. There's too much tolerance and too many chances given to athletes using banned substances, it's well past time to bring the hammer down on them.

Agree or disagree?

I'd agree, if not for the Steve Howe defense.

I'm familiar with Howe's career, struggles and demise, but a quick Googling turned up nothing obvious as to the defense you mentioned. Fill me in?

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MM, it's like the Chewbacca defense. It doesn't exist.

Gotcha. I was gonna say, all I turned up was that he supposedly tried cocaine because he thought it couldn't be much different from Ritalin. Whatever. While reading up, I was also wondering if the "I have a disease" line of bull was going to come into play, but I'll never buy that. Alcoholism and drug addiction aren't diseases, they're choices. And I'm saying that coming from a family with more than one alcoholic in the line, lest anyone question my perspective or fairness.

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I agree he shouldn't be allowed to get this stuff. It's ridiculous.

And he says he took his punishment and whatever. My foot he did. I'm not complaining, because Merriman or not, the Rams never had a chance in the game. But, Merriman had the gall to appeal his suspension to play one more week before it set in even though he knew there was NO WAY to overturn the suspension. That's not taking your punishment.

There's a huge double standard at work here, and it really bothers me.

If a baseball home run hitter is even suspected of using steroids, he's one of the most dispicable human beings on the earth.

If it's a pitcher or a scrappy baseball player, well, shame on them, but meh.

And if it's a football player, well, he made a mistake, but he's just trying to compete, plus, look how good he is!

It's ridiculous.

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I dug this thread up because as you might've seen, the Dolphins' Jason Taylor had some very interesting things to say today about Merriman and his questionable candidacy for postseason honors. First, here's a link to the story:

espn.com

I think Taylor's exactly right. I'm a hard-liner on the drug issue anyway, if I made the rules it would be a lifetime ban for one's second offense. Give them one chance to learn their lesson, and then lock them out forever if they make the same stupid mistake again. But regarding the story's specific point, I agree completely that anyone who tests positive should be automatically ineligible for postseason awards or even playing in the Pro Bowl that year. Some will argue about false positives--but any high level athlete, amateur or pro knows exactly what's forbidden to them, and exactly what they're putting into their body. There's too much tolerance and too many chances given to athletes using banned substances, it's well past time to bring the hammer down on them.

Agree or disagree?

Disagree, only because I believe it should be a lifetime ban for one's first offense. You don't need chances to learn your lesson. One strike and out you go. In fact, Merriman wouldn't have even made it into the NFL had I been commish, if only because of his first offense when he was in college.

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Disagree, only because I believe it should be a lifetime ban for one's first offense. You don't need chances to learn your lesson. One strike and out you go. In fact, Merriman wouldn't have even made it into the NFL had I been commish, if only because of his first offense when he was in college.

Man, it must be tough being perfect...

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