Jump to content

Weirdest Brand Manual Ever


SDX

Recommended Posts

seeing as i very nearly did a degree in physics instead of design, this really caught my attention yesterday.

it was particularly telling that after the reems and reems of pseudo science relating their logo to half baked ideas gleaned

from the idiots guide to theoretical physics, the last section effective says "and look! the new logo looks like smiley faces too!"

this is exactly why marketing is pure evil and has all the intellectual merit of homeopathy and :censored: like that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Really? I thought I was the only graphic designer who loved physics. I'm reading a book, The Physics of Nascar. My first thought when I looked at this was, "Are people at Pepsi really that dumb and gullible?" I mean seriously, anyone with half a brain would've either told this agency to come back when they actually had something worth while, or just laugh at them. If I was the head of a company and an agency walked in with that crap, I would've fired them right then and there. This is not funny, this is sad that there are agencies out there that can sell corporations on ideas this bad. What's really sad about this, is that this suppose to be serious. At least I think, of course there is the possibility that this is all complete sarcasm and put out there to make people talk about it and really, how much are we talking about Pepsi and not Coke? This could be either the dumbest thing yet, or the most brilliant thing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just read it cover to cover. It's absolutely brilliant, and I guarantee that it sold Pepsi on the whole idea.

I'm not arguing with you Joel, I just am curious on why you think it's brilliant. At first I thought it was stupid, but then I thought they might be looking at this differently than us "normal" people. What do you see in it that's brilliant?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just read it cover to cover. It's absolutely brilliant, and I guarantee that it sold Pepsi on the whole idea.

I'm not arguing with you Joel, I just am curious on why you think it's brilliant. At first I thought it was stupid, but then I thought they might be looking at this differently than us "normal" people. What do you see in it that's brilliant?

Because a big part of a logo design is selling the client on the idea. You can show up with 3 incredible logos, but if those logos don't tell a tale, many clients aren't going to give 2 sheets about them. They want a story to tell their business buddies and some PR to spin.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just read it cover to cover. It's absolutely brilliant, and I guarantee that it sold Pepsi on the whole idea.

I'm not arguing with you Joel, I just am curious on why you think it's brilliant. At first I thought it was stupid, but then I thought they might be looking at this differently than us "normal" people. What do you see in it that's brilliant?

Because a big part of a logo design is selling the client on the idea. You can show up with 3 incredible logos, but if those logos don't tell a tale, many clients aren't going to give 2 sheets about them. They want a story to tell their business buddies and some PR to spin.

So basically what you're saying is give the client complete BS and tell them they are the greatest, even though they are the worst company on the face of the earth? So basically, tell them what they want to hear?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just read it cover to cover. It's absolutely brilliant, and I guarantee that it sold Pepsi on the whole idea.

I'm not arguing with you Joel, I just am curious on why you think it's brilliant. At first I thought it was stupid, but then I thought they might be looking at this differently than us "normal" people. What do you see in it that's brilliant?

Because a big part of a logo design is selling the client on the idea. You can show up with 3 incredible logos, but if those logos don't tell a tale, many clients aren't going to give 2 sheets about them. They want a story to tell their business buddies and some PR to spin.

So basically what you're saying is give the client complete BS and tell them they are the greatest, even though they are the worst company on the face of the earth? So basically, tell them what they want to hear?

It's not necessarily telling them their company is great, it's about telling them them why you're design is great and great for them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just read it cover to cover. It's absolutely brilliant, and I guarantee that it sold Pepsi on the whole idea.

I'm not arguing with you Joel, I just am curious on why you think it's brilliant. At first I thought it was stupid, but then I thought they might be looking at this differently than us "normal" people. What do you see in it that's brilliant?

Because a big part of a logo design is selling the client on the idea. You can show up with 3 incredible logos, but if those logos don't tell a tale, many clients aren't going to give 2 sheets about them. They want a story to tell their business buddies and some PR to spin.

So basically what you're saying is give the client complete BS and tell them they are the greatest, even though they are the worst company on the face of the earth? So basically, tell them what they want to hear?

It's not necessarily telling them their company is great, it's about telling them them why you're design is great and great for them.

Exactly. We're trying to sell them ideas, while they're trying to sell you product. What requires more BS to sell?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just read it cover to cover. It's absolutely brilliant, and I guarantee that it sold Pepsi on the whole idea.

I'm not arguing with you Joel, I just am curious on why you think it's brilliant. At first I thought it was stupid, but then I thought they might be looking at this differently than us "normal" people. What do you see in it that's brilliant?

Because a big part of a logo design is selling the client on the idea. You can show up with 3 incredible logos, but if those logos don't tell a tale, many clients aren't going to give 2 sheets about them. They want a story to tell their business buddies and some PR to spin.

So basically what you're saying is give the client complete BS and tell them they are the greatest, even though they are the worst company on the face of the earth? So basically, tell them what they want to hear?

Hmmm...

I don't see anything like that at all in my response.

All I said is you have to sell your story to the client. How is that complete BS? They want a story because not only does it show you actually thought about what you were doing, but then they can sell that story as well.

Do you think you can walk into a meeting with business owners and just throw 3 logos on the table and say "pick one?" Sure once in awhile that works, and it works more with Sports Logos, but for a company like Pepsi, that ain't going to fly. You HAVE to give them a reason to change their logo to what you are proposing, otherwise why are they going to do it? "I dunno...it just looks cool" is a really dumb way of presenting a logo.

Don't pretend that graphic design isn't about marketing and business. We aren't saving the world here, we're trying to maximize profits for our clients (and ourselves). The stories behind the designs help do that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To expand on what I was saying, so you don't get the wrong impression. It's obvious that the design team put a lot of thought and effort into the rebranding for Pepsi. I don't think any of what is in the brand manual, in reference to the oscillations/geometries, is BS. I think it was well thought out and to be dismissed as BS is doing a disservice to the design team. They did their homework and came up with (in my opinion) a great set of marks.

It sure got you guys talking and made people take notice, didn't it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.