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Original Baltimore Ravens Logo Package


TruColor

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I've been going through the original Ravens' logo collection - used from 1996 through 1998...here is the complete set, "RGB-optimized":

Primary Logo:

BaltimoreRavens_PRM_1996-1998.png

...secondaries coming up next...

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Question for you...

You're optimizing this for screen performance right? So why does the black appear lighter instead of a deep black? I know there's different blacks and all that, but wouldn't the optimal value have it always appear dark on whatever the surface?

Not saying you're the one with the mistake either. Just seems odd to me.

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I've been going around and around with that issue. Basically, if my intent is to show these graphics on-screen as close as possible as they would look when printed with spot colors, then even the blacks should be representative of their true color.

With these Ravens' graphics, they were using PANTONE Black 6 C:

PMS_Black6_C_SRGB.png

Black 6 C is a mixture of 54% PANTONE Black and 46% PANTONE Reflex Blue. All NFL teams during this era (approx. 1996 through 2001) used Black 6 C when representing Black. In 2002, all teams moved to PANTONE Process Black C:

PMS_ProcessBlack_C_SRGB.png

...except for the Carolina Panthers, who still use Black 6 C.

Most of my graphics are using Process Black C - which is basically just a representation of 100% Black (in CMYK terms). Along those lines however, is PANTONE Black C, which is an ink representation of the color Black:

PMS_Black_C_SRGB.png

IMO - Black C is rather Orange-ish...it makes the graphics really wash-out when used. In fact, the CMYK breakdown of Black C is as follows:

C:56 M:56 Y:53 K:92

Personally, I think using a true Black in RGB terms (R:00 G:00 B:00) almost "cheapens" the look of the graphic. To me, using Process Black C (R:30 G:30 B:30) gives the graphic more depth.

And, monitor calibration also plays a part. Most uncalibrated monitors tend to have the contrast cranked way up - these Blacks would look almost Gray. Everyone should perform SOME sort of calibration - whether it's using a free utility, Adobe Gamma, or something more robust - like Pantone's huey, or X-Rite's ColorMunki.

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did secondary 2 ever have the primary wings? i want to think we did some promotional vehicles for Miller Lite Beer and they had the wings and the state flag crest look shield. (and i could be wrong, that was a long time ago)

Not that I can recall (though I'm not privy to any inside information). Secondary 2 was used in the form shown here on the pants (on the front of one hip in 1996, then on both hips/within the pants stripes after that).

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Wordmark 3:

BaltimoreRavens_WM3_1996-1998.png

I've never seen this logo before until just now. That is quite spiffy.

On a broader note...some might look upon the '90s era of sports branding/uniform design, but this and the former identity of the Jacksonville Jaguars were, to me, the two most unique, most cohesive brand identities in all of the NFL. Sure, there were about 15 logos total, but they were all cohesive and, as respective packages, unique among the NFL. Also note the script logos are actually logos for the most part...not glorified custom font "text"marks like far too many "script logos" are these days.

Man I miss logo design like this. I really friggin' do.

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Wordmark 3:

On a broader note...some might look upon the '90s era of sports branding/uniform design, but this and the former identity of the Jacksonville Jaguars were, to me, the two most unique, most cohesive brand identities in all of the NFL. Sure, there were about 15 logos total, but they were all cohesive and, as respective packages, unique among the NFL. Also note the script logos are actually logos for the most part...not glorified custom font "text"marks like far too many "script logos" are these days.

Man I miss logo design like this. I really friggin' do.

I think you have to include the Eagles in this too. Their package that was released in '96 (and tweaked a few times over the years) is among the strongest and most consistent brands in the league. Every element works together, they have a script logo like what you are saying, and their colors - for better or worse - are at least unique.

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Wordmark 3:

On a broader note...some might look upon the '90s era of sports branding/uniform design, but this and the former identity of the Jacksonville Jaguars were, to me, the two most unique, most cohesive brand identities in all of the NFL. Sure, there were about 15 logos total, but they were all cohesive and, as respective packages, unique among the NFL. Also note the script logos are actually logos for the most part...not glorified custom font "text"marks like far too many "script logos" are these days.

Man I miss logo design like this. I really friggin' do.

I think you have to include the Eagles in this too. Their package that was released in '96 (and tweaked a few times over the years) is among the strongest and most consistent brands in the league. Every element works together, they have a script logo like what you are saying, and their colors - for better or worse - are at least unique.

Yes...also the Eagles. Completely forgot about them. Let's add them.

Here's the thing about all three teams I just mentioned: all three had basically the exact same style of uniform, save for pants stripe. Think about it...all three utilized unique customized typography that, at least to me, looks as good now as it did then. In the case of the Ravens and Jaguars, trade out the purple for teal and their uniforms were damn near similar (black helmet, team color jersey, white pants, black socks). Also, I thought it to be a neat coincidence that all three of these teams went with white pants (primarily...well, at least after '99 I think, for the Ravens) and black socks to complete their uniforms. What they've basically created was a contemporary classic.

I say all that to say this: the Ravens kinda started chipping at that with the black leotard thing they've been doing lately, but for the most part, they still have a contemporary classic. Same with the Eagles, minus the chipping. Jacksonville? Boy...I ain't even going there.

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This is slightly OT, but I've always thought the Ravens should have gone with Black, Purple and SILVER, instead of Metallic Gold - to further differentiate them from the Vikings' Purple and Gold. Here's a recolored secondary shield - using Silver in place of the Metallic Gold, and with the true shades of Yellow and Red in the Maryland flag elements:

BaltimoreRavens_PropSEC.png

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Secondary Logo 1:

BaltimoreRavens_SE1_1996-1998.png

Is the one you posted unique from this one, or is the one I posted a bad reproduction?

311.gif

The top one I posted is from 1996 through 1998, yours is from 1999 through present.

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Purple/silver/black isn't a bad idea, Tony, but then you run into the problem the Panthers had with blue/silver/black, which is that an old man in a tracksuit tries to sue you. Given that the Ravens most likely have a murderer at middle linebacker, they're already appropriating the Raiders enough as it is.

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Purple/silver/black isn't a bad idea, Tony, but then you run into the problem the Panthers had with blue/silver/black, which is that an old man in a tracksuit tries to sue you. Given that the Ravens most likely have a murderer at middle linebacker, they're already appropriating the Raiders enough as it is.

Yeah, but with silver in the place of gold, you could still use the black helmet/purple jersey/black pants structure for the uniform.

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