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Tips to catch'n a logo theft


iDonovan

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Just a friendly tip for a few of you out there. I did a logo for an up coming major league lacrosse team. It was all hush hush...untill they got the money in place to start the team. I was aproached to design the team logo. thinking this was my big break I jumped at it. But as it turns out they lost the funding and everything fell apart. Now I gave him the artwork and waited for a cheque. Only to find the logo being used for a local team, just the name was changed. So I did some searching and found the place that did some work for him. As it turns out he was using my logo for his son team without every paying me...and have been avoiding me for months.

Basically to short'n the story I had a meeting yeterday with him and the guy that did some work for him. He stood right in front of me a lied saying this other guy just worked from his ideas. (This is the good part) I then open the CorelDraw file on his computer zoomed into the corner of the design so small you could barely see it....and there it was "property of ID by Donovan 2004" Lets just say when I mentioned court a cheque book was opened.

Always hide your info in your artwork and designs

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Great tip to leave your ID in the design but any professional designer would know it's there, no matter how small it is. What did he do when he saw your tag line?

well, if you have a large artboard, and you put it in white in a corner away from the artwork, nobody would ever look there. then you can show them in cases such as this.

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Great tip to leave your ID in the design but any professional designer would know it's there, no matter how small it is.  What did he do when he saw your tag line?

well, if you have a large artboard, and you put it in white in a corner away from the artwork, nobody would ever look there. then you can show them in cases such as this.

Well let's take Illustrator into consideration. Usually if you're dealing with a piece of artwork you would know of every little object within the drawing board would you not? But then again if it's a stolen piece then you probably wouldn't even bother so I guess you're right. It's worth a shot but not 100% bullet proof.

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PDF's my friend. But it wouldn't have helped idonovan, cause he would have to supply the password to the client. Of course he could make it read only. There's no reason a client needs to alter a logo in reality.

I don't know, if something is in the far corner, I wouldn't neccesarily know about it. Esspecially if you made it white. If you did a select all, but how many times do you really do that? I rarely do at least.

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True, PDF's do have that function but how many people use PDF's as their primary artboard?

you could save it as a PDF and password protect it. Not sure if you can leave it editable and have it password protected or not. Once you have open a PDF in Illustrator you have your full artboard again.

I've never done it, so don't quote me on any of this. I konw all these are options, however I don't know how solid they are or if they work together.

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The sig line is a good idea, but if the user was printing this out in another application, it may show up. Say you had an Illustrator EPS and placed in QuarkXPress to print out. After placing the art in a picture box, you hit "Scale to Fit (Proportionally)". The dimensions of the art piece used to mathematically scale it include the "hidden" sig line, no matter where in the whole artboard you placed it. So the artwork would appear a lot smaller than you wanted, but there would be an unusual amount of extra space around the artpiece in the picture box.

It's still a great idea though. Extra protection. The Trojan of anti-theft artwork devices :)

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But it was always my thought that PDF aren't as good to work with compared to AI files. I thought that when you saved it to PDF then some of the art or functionality would be out the window.

You can save a PDF to maintain illustrator editing capabilities. So it won't flatten the image. You can see this with the Bobcat's PDF on their uniforms. I opened that in illustrator and was able to get the rejected logos from them. Everything was still high quality. Its not ideal, but it would offer some password protection.

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