dfwabel

Football and CTE

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53 minutes ago, Sykotyk said:

This is an incredibly PRO sports site. It would be quite odd, actually, to find not already banned members who are openly and defiantly against sports. But then again, that's indicative of the sample bias.

 

While those who post enjoy sport, I think this site is more paternalistic. Especially since there a bunch of 80's/90's who were latchkey kids or kids of divorce on here.

 

 

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12 hours ago, dfwabel said:

While those who post enjoy sport, I think this site is more paternalistic. Especially since there a bunch of 80's/90's who were latchkey kids or kids of divorce on here.

 

:rolleyes:

 

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On 8/5/2017 at 11:25 PM, Sykotyk said:

This is an incredibly PRO sports site.

"Some people like college too," I mutter, as we achieve the inverse of "Prologo"

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On 7/30/2017 at 6:03 PM, the admiral said:

I know we'll never eradicate high school football in Texas, the Southeast, Ohio, or western PA, but I could see it dropping off in a lot of other parts of the country, especially at two extremes: upper-class school districts where parents don't want their children's highly competitive and already tenuous futures jeopardized by football, and poor districts where schools can't afford the fast-escalating costs of insuring a football program. I'd look at non-Ohio states in the Great Lakes, New England, and California as places where you'll start to see high school football disappear in patches.

 

http://www.suntimeshighschoolsports.com/2017/08/07/high-school-football-participation-declines-locally-nationally/

 

Almost 26,000 fewer students played football in 2016-17 than in 2015-16. Football is still the top sport in overall participation, with more than 1 million students playing.



In Illinois, football is in the midst of a nine-year decline in participation. In 2008, 51,334 students played football.  There were 42,682 students playing football in Illinois in 2016-17.

 

yep

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1 hour ago, HedleyLamarr said:

The hell is a latchkey kid?

 

When both of your parents, or you custodial parent, works and is not home when you get out of school, you use your key to get into the house/apartment and make yourself useful.   I was one,  and in the time before 9 Brazillion cable channels in the late 70s, early 80s, we did our homework, made dinners,  etc.  Oh, and football was pushed onto every male in high school, even in upstate NY.

 

 

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You might at least give us the headline. Time doesn't need you to troll for clicks. 

 

Quote

'Concussion' Doctor: Letting Kids Play Football is 'Definition of Child Abuse'

 

But he's not wrong. 

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9 hours ago, Gothamite said:

You might at least give us the headline. Time doesn't need you to troll for clicks. 

 

 

But he's not wrong. 

 

Nope, not wrong at all. It's very clear what football at all levels does to the brain. Dropping your kid on their head accidentally makes parents feel terrible and harms them, and doing so intentionally is child abuse. Why does it become ok when the equivalent is done in the course of playing football? Adults choosing to destroy their brains of their own choice is one thing, but kids don't understand the damage they're doing to their bodies, so it's on the parents to protect them.

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7 hours ago, goalieboy82 said:

any sport were you get hit, there is bound to be some kind of damage to the brain/body, see Earl Campbell.  

 

Which in no way minimizes our new understating of the dangers, excuses us from doing the research or justifies the NFL's coverup.

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7 hours ago, goalieboy82 said:

any sport were you get hit, there is bound to be some kind of damage to the brain/body, see Earl Campbell.  

Earl Campbell also played about 80% of his NCAA and NFL career on cement, err AstroTurf. Averaging 25 carries/year at Texas and 22 carries/ game his first six NFL seasons (1,885 carries in 85 games played).

 

That's hitting your head OK on the turf a lot.

 

While he took part in failed businesses after getting an injury settlement worth milluins, Billy Sims got kinda lucky to tear his ACL in year 5 of his NFL career of overuse as he had the same path of turf games in college and NFL.

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On 8/9/2017 at 7:50 AM, Gothamite said:

You might at least give us the headline. Time doesn't need you to troll for clicks. 

 

 

But he's not wrong. 

The "concussion doctor" isn't exactly objective when talking about this issue. Ditto for that Dr. McKee. It's hilarious to suggest youth football is abusive in any way, thousands of kids have benefited from the sport. With correct teaching, better oversight, and technology, the concussion rate will decline. If parents are still concerned, they can wait until a slightly older age for their child to compete. Too many positives from the game to try and drive people away.

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9 hours ago, Gold Pinstripes said:

With correct teaching, better oversight, and technology, the concussion rate will decline.

 

What was that I was saying about when the conversation turns to concussions?

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10 hours ago, Gold Pinstripes said:

The "concussion doctor" isn't exactly objective when talking about this issue. Ditto for that Dr. McKee. It's hilarious to suggest youth football is abusive in any way, thousands of kids have benefited from the sport. With correct teaching, better oversight, and technology, the concussion rate will decline. If parents are still concerned, they can wait until a slightly older age for their child to compete. Too many positives from the game to try and drive people away.

 

If the correct teaching to which you refer includes instructing kids to outright avoid collisions, I totally agree.

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Former NFL player Ed Cunningham resigned from his job as ESPN college football analyst due to his belief that the sport is not safe for the brain.

 

Excerpt:

Quote

But Cunningham, 48, resigned from one of the top jobs in sports broadcasting because of his growing discomfort with the damage being inflicted on the players he was watching each week. The hits kept coming, right in front of him, until Cunningham said he could not, in good conscience, continue his supporting role in football’s multibillion-dollar apparatus.

“I take full ownership of my alignment with the sport,” he said. “I can just no longer be in that cheerleader’s spot.”

“In its current state, there are some real dangers: broken limbs, wear and tear,” Cunningham said. “But the real crux of this is that I just don’t think the game is safe for the brain. To me, it’s unacceptable.”

 

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I watched the Frontline on concussions recently. Gives you a lot to think about. I tell you what, it gets harder and harder to watch football every year knowing this stuff. 

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2 minutes ago, Crabcake47 said:

I watched the Frontline on concussions recently. Gives you a lot to think about. I tell you what, it gets harder and harder to watch football every year knowing this stuff. 

 

Right there with you. I've lost most of my interest in the sport. Between the CTE issue, the seeming slew of scandals and suicides, and the way the NFL just treated dedicated fan bases in San Diego, St. Louis and Oakland (many of whom I'm friends with of both the former and latter)... I'm just about done. As it is I no longer really look forward to football season like I used to.

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16 hours ago, Crabcake47 said:

I watched the Frontline on concussions recently. Gives you a lot to think about. I tell you what, it gets harder and harder to watch football every year knowing this stuff. 

Couldn't disagree more, I have a bigger issue with the constant interruptions on NFL games. Whether it's youth football to the NFL, the sport is still well ahead on the balance sheet, and we should always remember this is a voluntarily activity. Technology will play a big role in keeping football as our national pastime. The violence and collisions are the essence of tackle football, and that will never change.

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