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The New England/Mid-Atlantic Conference: Football Uniforms (Special Alts)

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I really like the third for Warwick, but it feels a little out of place with the Greek "trident" kinda thing. Other than that, good work again!

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Excellent color palette for Warwick. I think the tertiary could be better if the lighthouse were slightly taller.

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Sorry for the delay, responsibilities decided to get in the way of things. But, with that all handled, I should be able to get everything out pretty quick now (as I planned initially).

 

UCC Presentation.png

Update: Thanks to Brian in Boston for his input on the school seal.

 

Founded in 1794, the University of Cape Cod is the oldest and smallest school in the NEMAC, and historically one of the most successful (both academically and athletically). The winners of 4 college football, 3 men's soccer, and 1 men's basketball NCAA Championships, Cape Cod is considered one of the powerhouses of sports. Unfortunately for the Reds, each of the football championships came before 1980. Prior to 1982, Cape Cod participated in one of college football's most storied rivalries. The Cape Cod - Harvard Rivalry, though not on the level of Harvard-Yale, was one of the most heated college football rivalries in the nation, especially during the 1950s. However, in 1982, the Ivy League dropped from Division 1-A, resulting in the first season in over 40 years to not include the rivalry. Since, Cape Cod and Harvard have played 4 times, most recently in 2005 with UCC winning all four (bringing the overall record to 34-26-1 in favor of Harvard). 

 

Formerly the Indians, the Reds changed their name in 1979 due to mounting pressure from the local native american population as well as the students. The school went without a name for 3 seasons before conducting a contest to choose a new mascot. Though 5 names were submitted, it ultimately came down to two: The Reds (the nickname used originally by the school, and continued use on merchandise throughout its history) and the Cranberries. Initially added as a joke, the Cranberries caught on quick, and it not only described the team's color, but also described a major industry along Cape Cod (which is famous for its cranberry bogs). Ultimately, the Reds was chosen, but the school made a compromise.

 

While it was the Indians, Cape Cod featured the letter C with feathers protruding from the top corner of the C. After the name change, the decision was made to replace those feathers with a bundle of cranberries. This choice was made to appease both the losing "Cranberries" voters while keeping the school's visual identity as similar to the old look as possible.

 

The Secondary logo, primarily used in baseball, features interlocked letters, and the tertiary features the cranberries alone, which are most famous for their use as helmet stickers on the football team's helmets.

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Lafarge said:

Sorry for the delay, responsibilities decided to get in the way of things. But, with that all handled, I should be able to get everything out pretty quick now (as I planned initially).

 

Cape Cod Presentation.png

 

Founded in 1794, the University of Cape Cod is the oldest and smallest school in the NEMAC, and historically one of the most successful (both academically and athletically). The winners of 4 college football, 3 men's soccer, and 1 men's basketball NCAA Championships, Cape Cod is considered one of the powerhouses of sports. Unfortunately for the Reds, each of the football championships came before 1980. Prior to 1982, Cape Cod participated in one of college football's most storied rivalries. The Cape Cod - Harvard Rivalry, though not on the level of Harvard-Yale, was one of the most heated college football rivalries in the nation, especially during the 1950s. However, in 1982, the Ivy League dropped from Division 1-A, resulting in the first season in over 40 years to not include the rivalry. Since, Cape Cod and Harvard have played 4 times, most recently in 2005 with UCC winning all four (bringing the overall record to 34-26-1 in favor of Harvard). 

 

Formerly the Indians, the Reds changed their name in 1979 due to mounting pressure from the local native american population as well as the students. The school went without a name for 3 seasons before conducting a contest to choose a new mascot. Though 5 names were submitted, it ultimately came down to two: The Reds (the nickname used originally by the school, and continued use on merchandise throughout its history) and the Cranberries. Initially added as a joke, the Cranberries caught on quick, and it not only described the team's color, but also described a major industry along Cape Cod (which is famous for its cranberry bogs). Ultimately, the Reds was chosen, but the school made a compromise.

 

While it was the Indians, Cape Cod featured the letter C with feathers protruding from the top corner of the C. After the name change, the decision was made to replace those feathers with a bundle of cranberries. This choice was made to appease both the losing "Cranberries" voters while keeping the school's visual identity as similar to the old look as possible.

 

The Secondary logo, primarily used in baseball, features interlocked letters, and the tertiary features the cranberries alone, which are most famous for their use as helmet stickers on the football team's helmets.

 

 

So, I'm not really versed in Latin. The School Seal is obviously supposed to say University of Cade Cod, but I'm not sure if my amateur translation was correct. If anyone is well versed and would be able to correct me on that, it would be greatly, greatly appreciated.

I took 2 years of Latin but I'm not that good at it. I think it's right, but honestly I'm not too sure.

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I got really confused for a second cause there's actually a real NCAA Conference called NEWMAC but it doesn't have football.

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Two things today: An update for UCC and the next school.

 

Vermont A&M Presentation.png

 

The Vermont Agricultural and Mechanical University is the second (and youngest) research university in Vermont. As its name suggests, the University is known for its agricultural studies. It's particularly renowned for its Forestry and Dendrology studies, and has been at the forefront of several major environmental and forest industrial advances. This expertise has resulted in the nickname "Maplers," referring to one who farms maple syrup, a leading industry in the state. This expertise has not really translated into sports however. The Maplers are generally mediocre in the standings in most sports, sans basketball, which is a regular NCAA tournament participant (though it has never advanced past the Sweet 16).

 

The Maplers primary features the school mascot, know simply as Ben. The image shows Ben carrying sap collecting buckets. Traditionally, these buckets were attached by rope to a yoke, carried upon the farmer's shoulders. Ben wears a hat and clothing designed based upon the common outfits worn in the 1800s by farmers. A small quirk in the logo is the asymmetry of Ben's hair, (implemented partially by the University as a copyright protection measure). 

 

The secondary logo is the Maplers' letter logo. The inner yellow portion creates a V. In the center of the V is a chevron, representing the letter A. This also creates a negative space letter M. (The legs of the A and the M are the same shape. Look at the diamond in the center of the logo. The top of the diamond is the top of the A, and the bottom half of the diamond creates the M.). It is a common claim that the logo also represents a flying Hermit Thrush, the Vermont state bird, though this is considered false by the university. 

 

There are two tertiary logos in the Maplers' repertoire. First, is a lone head logo (which is actually used more than the primary logo, ala NBA teams). The second is a 14-point maple leaf. The 14 points were specifically selected to represent Vermont's status as the 14th state in the United States (and the first non-original colony).  

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Awesome work on Vermont A&M!  Looks realistic and well-rounded, although I'm curious on one thing - for the letters and numbers, why not something that matches the wordmark more?  Something similar to what Wyoming uses for football might be good:

11630556.jpeg

Other than that, great work!  Also, I know I'm late on this, but great work on Cape Cod!  It gives off this authentic old-school vibe in all regards.  Can't wait to see what's next!

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4 hours ago, Lafarge said:

Two things today: An update for UCC and the next school.

 

Vermont A&M Presentation.png

 

The Vermont Agricultural and Mechanical University is the second (and youngest) research university in Vermont. As its name suggests, the University is known for its agricultural studies. It's particularly renowned for its Forestry and Dendrology studies, and has been at the forefront of several major environmental and forest industrial advances. This expertise has resulted in the nickname "Maplers," referring to one who farms maple syrup, a leading industry in the state. This expertise has not really translated into sports however. The Maplers are generally mediocre in the standings in most sports, sans basketball, which is a regular NCAA tournament participant (though it has never advanced past the Sweet 16).

 

The Maplers primary features the school mascot, know simply as Ben. The image shows Ben carrying sap collecting buckets. Traditionally, these buckets were attached by rope to a yoke, carried upon the farmer's shoulders. Ben wears a hat and clothing designed based upon the common outfits worn in the 1800s by farmers. A small quirk in the logo is the asymmetry of Ben's hair, (implemented partially by the University as a copyright protection measure). 

 

The secondary logo is the Maplers' letter logo. The inner yellow portion creates a V. In the center of the V is a chevron, representing the letter A. This also creates a negative space letter M. (The legs of the A and the M are the same shape. Look at the diamond in the center of the logo. The top of the diamond is the top of the A, and the bottom half of the diamond creates the M.). It is a common claim that the logo also represents a flying Hermit Thrush, the Vermont state bird, though this is considered false by the university. 

 

There are two tertiary logos in the Maplers' repertoire. First, is a lone head logo (which is actually used more than the primary logo, ala NBA teams). The second is a 14-point maple leaf. The 14 points were specifically selected to represent Vermont's status as the 14th state in the United States (and the first non-original colony).  

 

This is a fantastic concept, love every bit of it. Enjoying the series, keep it up!

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On 10/5/2016 at 4:38 PM, FlyingLamprey said:

Awesome work on Vermont A&M!  Looks realistic and well-rounded, although I'm curious on one thing - for the letters and numbers, why not something that matches the wordmark more?  Something similar to what Wyoming uses for football might be good:

11630556.jpeg

Other than that, great work!  Also, I know I'm late on this, but great work on Cape Cod!  It gives off this authentic old-school vibe in all regards.  Can't wait to see what's next!

 

Actually, Wyoming is the exact reason I didn't use a font that matched the wordmark. Theoretically, this would be a conference in the real world, so I wanted to avoid having an identity that was basically the same as Wyoming's.

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Hale Universiy Presentation.png

 

 

Hale University was founded in 1874 as a private University (converting to a public institution in 1968) by the Hale family of Connecticut. The family founded the school in Coventry, the hometown of famed patriot Nathan Hale, leading many to believe that the school was founded by his direct family (It wasn't; The Hale University family is distantly related by marriage). An accurate description of Hale is to call it the Purdue of the NEMAC. Academically, it's a respected school, particularly lauded for its Engineering programs. Athletically, Hale... has seen better days. Its once talented football program has turned into something of an embarrassment for the conference, and its move to the West Division was considered to make the East division much stronger. Hale's struggles do not follow to other sports, where they are middle of the pack in most, and actually somewhat competitive in men's soccer.

 

Hale's primary logo is a simple interlocked HU. Originally, the HU logo consisted of the letters being placed at even heights (no space between the bottom of the H and the space in the U. However, this became difficult to distinguish from a distance, so in 1971, the school altered the logo to its current state. As noted, on a blank or orange background, the letters are a single color with a black outline. On a black background, the letters take on white/orange and maintain the now invisible black background. The secondary logo is a Robin, the school's mascot. Of note, the Robins wings feature 11 "points," which represent the year 1911, the first year the name Robins was officially used.

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University of New Jersey Presentation.png

 

The University of New Jersey is the cream of the crop in the West Division. Located in one of the top rated college towns in America, UNJ has managed to successfully overcome its state's negative stereotypes to become one of the most well-respected and popular programs in the United States. Of course, that success has also led to the burning hatred of all other teams in the conference. The younger of the two major New Jersey schools, one would have expected UNJ to experience a sort of little brother syndrome. However, UNJ has enjoyed the most success in its rivalry with Rutgers, leading heavily in the following series: Football, 31-17-2; Basketball, 26-3; Annual Blood Drive, 11-0. Fun fact, prior to offering Rutgers a spot, the B1G conference attempted to entice UNJ into the conference. However, the negotiations to create NEMAC were already underway, and UNJ preferred to remain in a conference with traditional rivals. 

 

Being one of the elite classic programs (like Texas, Bama, Michigan, USC, etc.), UNJ has a very simple, yet iconic logo set. The primary logo are the letters NJ interlocked. This was derived from an old logo featuring a backwards J with (with no bottom serif) to create a U and a J (This logo may appear in a throwback uniform). The secondary logo represents a leaping mustang. Like the primary, it is a simple, yet iconic design, creating an unmistakable helmet. 

 

Being such a simple design, I wanted to make it apparent that I still put the time and effort placed into the other designs. Therefore, I created the letters and numerals from scratch. The idea behind the font was to make a modified block letter system that would also be unique, while also mimicking the modern block styles of companies like Nike. The most unique element of the font is the bottom serif, which extends slightly below the bottom of the other letters. This serif is only used when facing sideways, and does not have a symmetrical top serif (hence why the C and 3 do not have the extended serifs).

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Simple and sleek, I like it. I think this was the first school seal that didn't strike me though. I think some decorative markers around the "EST. 1896" would be helpful in distinguishing it from the university name.

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This is great. I love the nj monogram.  I do think the horse's head may be a bit too big but it's not a big deal. I love this by the way. Very creative and the detail and thought out into the back stories is evident.

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Thanks for the comments, guys! I kind of agree with you on the school seal, steelman. I'm not the biggest fan of how it turned out. I'm gonna leave it for now, simply because I don't really have an idea of how to fix it properly. Regarding the horse, I'm not really seeing it. But I'll take a look at it again once I come back when I fix the school seal, and I'll give it an edit if I see anything.

 

Also, sorry for the delay. I had the next school completed before deciding to scrap and redo the whole thing. It should be up shortly.

 

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This is a gorgeous series, lots of unique colour schemes. The Robin secondary with the actual robin is absolutely beautiful. 

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Elyria Presentation.png

 

The Elyria College was founded in 1901, and is one of three current private schools in the NEMAC. Looking to establish a college in Cleveland, founder Wallace Müller decided that he did not wish to pay the property costs that were required within the city. Instead, he looked west, to a small suburb of the city known as Elyria. Upon the school's founding, Müller decided the school needed to stand out from the previously established schools. One answer to this was found in the school's primary color, Purple. Much like Northeastern, purple has become a major part of the school's identity, even more so since the school, in an attempt to include a darker color (gotta love the early 200s), spurned black and incorporated a second, darker purple into its identity (this was ironic since Elyria is located on the black river, so it would seem that invoking the color black would make sense). In 1908, construction of an observation tower at the school inadvertently established the team's mascot. Almost immediately after construction was completed, the open air tower (which was designed in such a way that that the interior was rather dark) became inhabited by a colony of bats, making use of the tower nearly impossible for students and faculty. During the day, the bats were present and sleeping, and at night, the observation tower was closed for public use. Initially, the school planned to take action to remove the bats, but by this time, they had become a school symbol, and students pushed back. Instead, the school permanently closed access to the tower, and altered the bottom portion of the tower as an area for hibernation in the winter. This led to the creation of America's largest bat studies program. Naturally, the school made the bat its mascot.

 

Elyria's primary logo, like many colleges is a simple interlocking letter formation. This logo features an E/C combo, with the C moving from behind the E up top, to in front on the bottom. The secondary logo features a flying bat, incorporating the primary and tertiary purple colors. The tertiary features the same bat hanging, a representation of the bats hanging within the observation tower. Like New Jersey, Elyria features a custom, modified block font. 

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Ossipee Presentation.png

 

Located in a tiny town in New Hampshire, Ossipee is known as a powerhouse in both Athletic and Academic circles. Ossipee was named one of the original Public Ivies in 1985, becoming the first NEMAC school to gain such an honor (Maine State and Cape Cod received the distinction as well in 2001). As would seem obvious for a school in the Grantie State, Ossipee is most well known for it's Geology department. The University even hosts a branch campus in Conway New Hampshire which provides students greater access to the White Mountains for their studies. Athletically, Ossipee is the fierce rival of Maine State that is recognized as one of the most bitter and exciting in college football (On the level of Michigan vs. OSU, USC vs. UCLA, and Notre Dame vs. The Rest of America). Since 1955, the schools have competed for the Golden Moose, created after the schools decided they didn't want to trade a taxidermy Moose Head anymore. The series has been relatively even, with Maine State leading the series 31-27-3.

 

The Newts derive their name from the red spotted newt, the New Hampshire state amphibian. Originally, the team's logo featured a newt that frankly looked more like a frog and featured red spots on a green and yellow body. In 1998, the school decide to revamp its logos, creating a much more realistic looking newt mascot, and developing a heavily sytlized O, that was also used to represent the tail of the newt. Further, the school developed a fauxback logo based upon the previous design in order to appease those who would never stand for a new logo (This logo is not depicted here, but will be shown with the football uniforms). While the logos heavily feature forest green, the color is used sparingly, or not at all in most uniform designs, though the occasional alternate has included the color more heavily.

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Originally being from Ossipee, the Newts are by far my favorite so far! Everything looks awesome.Originally being from Ossipee, the Newts are by far my favorite so far! Everything looks awesome.

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You outdid yourself with the Newts! Brilliantly creative.

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