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NFL Salary Cap set to Disappear for '07


jkrdevil

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But like we've seen before in hockey and the Yankees in the last couple of years... money doesn't guarantee a championship.

You're right about that (Thank God!). However, it does buy the ability to compete effectively most of the time and its absence can make it extremely difficult to compete (Kansas City Royals, Pittsburgh Pirates, anyone?).

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But like we've seen before in hockey and the Yankees in the last couple of years... money doesn't guarantee a championship.

You're right about that (Thank God!). However, it does buy the ability to compete effectively most of the time and its absence can make it extremely difficult to compete (Kansas City Royals, Pittsburgh Pirates, anyone?).

Not to mention that when a team is lucky enough to start getting some talent on their team, they are raided by other teams with bigger wads of money. It makes the chances of being able to build a championship caliber team over a few seasons next to imposible. "Five Year" rebuilding plans would constantly have to start from scratch after free agency pillages the rosters. Anything short of a one-year wonder is going to happen.

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i don't know which is a bigger problem, teams like the redskins buying all the free agents up or teams like the cardinals that are penny pinchers and refuse to spend money on players.

the patriots have won 3 super bowls in the last 5 years and probably is better than most of the pre salary cap teams, while the cardinals and lions who are about as competitive as they were pre salary cap years. it still seems we still have the situation of dominant dynasties and non competitive bottom feeders.

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Still no deal, guys and official cuts took place today. Nothing too, too surprising, but big name fan favorites are about to get cut on Thursday to get teams under the 06 cap.

This could be a massacre.

Of course, its also quite likely that they are playing a game of chicken and one or the other will fold and get a deal done.

I, for one, really enjoyed reading about the 1890 MLB players league concept. I think in todays multimillionaire environment, it could work. With the right management. It could work.

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If the NFL gets to a point where they play an uncapped season, the league is in trouble. You think the players are going to give up their financial freedoms once they get a taste of it, not to mention the guarenteed contracts?

The owners are fighting a two-front battle: Against the players, and in-fighting amongst themselves. The big-money owners don't want as much revenue-sharing as the small-market owners do.

Worse case scenario: Teams like Green Bay, Jacksonville, and New Orleans being sold, uprooted, or possibly even folding and dispersing. Forget the strike, some teams' futures are riding on this labor dispute.

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But like we've seen before in hockey and the Yankees in the last couple of years... money doesn't guarantee a championship.

You're right about that (Thank God!). However, it does buy the ability to compete effectively most of the time and its absence can make it extremely difficult to compete (Kansas City Royals, Pittsburgh Pirates, anyone?).

The Pirates have incompetence going against them far more than monetary matters... but I digress.

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Worse case scenario: Teams like Green Bay, Jacksonville, and New Orleans being sold, uprooted, or possibly even folding and dispersing. Forget the strike, some teams' futures are riding on this labor dispute.

I think that's really an extreme scenario. Green Bay can't be uprooted really, but no NFL team's are going to fold or even be relocated due to a labor stoppage. If Katrina couldn't permanently move the Saints, a collective bargaining agreement sure as hell ain't gonna do it.

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I wont be shocked if teh NFL delays Free Agency temporailly or soemthing thsi year just to try and get something done without a deal this years cap gets tight and many veterans will be cut. In fact some of tehse cuts have already begun.

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The NFL and NFLPA have a history of getting things done, but Gene Upshaw's under the gun this time around.

Young players don't really remember that he was once a player himself, and they're looking at him to get them the best possible deal - not to make an equitable arrangement for both players and the teams.

The NFLPA wants a share of everything - from network (and local pre-season) TV revenue to merchandising to luxury suites to their Sirius satellite and even local radio deals. There's no way the NFL owners are going to allow some of those sacred cows to be slaughtered in the name of labor peace this time around.

Based on my sources (and I have a few, particularly in the NFLPA), the concept of a players' league is still on the burner but somewhat unlikely, but that a strike or lockout after 2007 is actually pretty likely - the owners are entrenched, perhaps emboldened by the NHL's lockout, and aren't willing to give an inch beyond some minor gives in network television revenue.

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I think that's really an extreme scenario. Green Bay can't be uprooted really, but no NFL team's are going to fold or even be relocated due to a labor stoppage. If Katrina couldn't permanently move the Saints, a collective bargaining agreement sure as hell ain't gonna do it.

The Packers might not be uprooted, but it'd be considerably harder for them to survive in an uncapped league. All things being equal, what player is going to choose going to an often-frozen small town in Wisconsin for whatever money the shareholders can agree to pony up for him when he could have the keys to Dan Snyder's fleet of private jets in Washington, or unlimited cash playing in a warm-weather city?

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I think that's really an extreme scenario.  Green Bay can't be uprooted really, but no NFL team's are going to fold or even be relocated due to a labor stoppage.  If Katrina couldn't permanently move the Saints, a collective bargaining agreement sure as hell ain't gonna do it.

The Packers might not be uprooted, but it'd be considerably harder for them to survive in an uncapped league. All things being equal, what player is going to choose going to an often-frozen small town in Wisconsin for whatever money the shareholders can agree to pony up for him when he could have the keys to Dan Snyder's fleet of private jets in Washington, or unlimited cash playing in a warm-weather city?

Why there is still revenue sharing and they were able to survive with free agency before there was a cap. In fact that was when they started to build those championship teams. They will still sell out every game, the Packers will be fine and they probably would be able to thrive.

When making comparisions to baseball remember this teams like the Pirates, Royals, and Devil Rays get more money in revenue sharing than they spend on payroll. So in that case it's those teams owners are to blame.

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When making comparisions to baseball remember this teams like the Pirates, Royals, and Devil Rays get more money in revenue sharing than they spend on payroll. So in that case it's those teams owners are to blame.

The thing to keep in mind is that no salary cap also means no salary FLOOR. The possibility would exist that a similar scenario to the Pittsburgh/Kansas City/Tampa Bay situation could occur in football, particularly if a team starts to struggle and attendance dwindles. Under the present system, on the other hand, the salary floor at least requires teams to put most of their funds into their on-field product.

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When making comparisions to baseball remember this teams like the Pirates, Royals, and Devil Rays get more money in revenue sharing than they spend on payroll. So in that case it's those teams owners are to blame.

The thing to keep in mind is that no salary cap also means no salary FLOOR. The possibility would exist that a similar scenario to the Pittsburgh/Kansas City/Tampa Bay situation could occur in football, particularly if a team starts to struggle and attendance dwindles. Under the present system, on the other hand, the salary floor at least requires teams to put most of their funds into their on-field product.

That's True and a team like the Cardinals mught do that. But to say now the smaller market teams won't be able to compete is wrong. Even without the cap small market team in the NFL can sign players and compete if they want to.

My whole point on basbeall was kind of off topic and seperate from the NFL.

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This just in from from ESPNEWS:

The NFL is to delay the start of free agency for another three days (until Midnight Sunday) to help teams to get under the cap.

Ladies and Gentlemen, the nuclear clock has been pushed back a few minutes.

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I wont be shocked if teh NFL delays Free Agency temporailly or soemthing thsi year just to try and get something done without a deal this years cap gets tight and many veterans will be cut. In fact some of tehse cuts have already begun.

I called it.

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