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I hate the Yankees.


joshhockey

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So today the Yankees signed Mark Teixiera to an 8 year $180 million deal. $180 MILLION! This is their 3rd big signing since the Winter Meetings began. They have spent over $400 million dollars on 3 signings! It seems like every other team is effected by the economic crisis except the Yankees.

I just wanted to get your opinions on whether or not there should be a salary cap in baseball and if what the Yankees are doing is even fair.

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Sure it's fair. If you had an ass load of money to spend, you would spend it too. I hate them already because I am a Sox fan, so it comes naturally, but they follow the rules at least. The amount of money they can spend is insane and ridiculous and I hate when they get the Teixeiras of the world but it makes it that much more interesting and that much sweeter to beat them, when/if we do.

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It's fair. The rules are the rules. It's not like spending all this money has produced any results for them. Sabathia is going to lose more games than he wins and his e.r.a. won't have the benefit of facing weaker hitters like it did in the NL. Let them spend all they want. It didn't help them last season. It won't help them this season. The last Yankees dynasty wasn't a bunch of high priced free agents. I'm not worried about them. The Rays still have a better "team." So do the Red Sox.

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Until there's any sort of proof that higher payroll = success, I don't think there needs to be a cap. Of all the teams that have gone out and thrown around money, the Red Sox have been the only successful one -- and they don't spend money like the Yankees. They spend their money to retain players, and if they can fix a problem by using the guys they have in their own system, they do it. The Red Sox have targeted Teixeira for 2 years -- had they upped their offer, he was theirs. But they gave him a value and didn't overshoot it.

Now with the Yankees, every year they've gone out and signed somebody that's made them the clear cut favorites to win the World Series and they've failed to do so. Every year Jeter gets worse at the dish, and his league worst defense becomes more of a liability at the shortstop position. Their two best pitchers, Sabathia and Wang have proven to be more harm than good in the postseason, and their #3 has never pitched in the postseason -- their best hitter is allergic to clutch hits. It remains to be seen if Joba can make the transition to starter for a full season. AJ Burnett can only stay healthy in contract years, and is actually a huge downgrade from what Mussina gave them last year.

There's spending money, and there's spending money wisely. I'd be more scared if they gave some of the guys in their system a chance to reach their potential.

The Red Sox have their own issues, as do the Rays. But you know what? If the Red Sox and Rays don't win the World Series this year, they're not the biggest laughing stock in Professional sports. The Cubs could go 300 years without winning a World Series and they still wouldn't be as big of a joke as the Yankees would be should they fall short this year. And if they do win it all? Who cares? If they fail, it'll be like the A-Rod trade part two.

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Sure it's fair. If you had an ass load of money to spend, you would spend it too. I hate them already because I am a Sox fan, so it comes naturally, but they follow the rules at least. The amount of money they can spend is insane and ridiculous and I hate when they get the Teixeiras of the world but it makes it that much more interesting and that much sweeter to beat them, when/if we do.

They do follow the rules to an extent. There is something like a "cap" and if you spend over that amount you must pay a luxury tax which the Yankees had to do but the tax was "only" 29 million. If you think about they aren't breaking the rules but bending them very far.

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Despite all of the huge contracts, I wouldn't be surprised if the Yankee$ finished in third place again. Good luck juggling all of those high-priced egos, Joe.

The 2008 Tigers proved that a huge payroll does not equal a guaranteed playoff berth. <_<

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Yeah, it's fair. But without money the Yankees would be the AL's Nationals. They have no farm system as far as I am aware of. They have to spend to compete. But look at the Twins, and now Rays. They can compete with no money because they have beastly farm systems. The Yankees got money to buy great players, but I see no team chemistry. (Pohlad, holla)

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Yeah, it's fair. But without money the Yankees would be the AL's Nationals. They have no farm system as far as I am aware of. They have to spend to compete. But look at the Twins, and now Rays. They can compete with no money because they have beastly farm systems. The Yankees got money to buy great players, but I see no team chemistry. (Pohlad, holla)

The Yankees actually have a very good farm system, which is impressive because as recently as four or five years ago their farm system was completely depleted.

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I think some of you guys are missing the point. The only thing you're seeing is that a team is spending an ungodly amount of money, gobbling up many of baseball's All-Stars and because they seem to do so without a clearly defined strategy and therefore falling short of expectations, you feel that means there is no problem. I disagree. In the proper hands (and minds) this limitless spending frenzy could make a constant contender, and arguably- trophies or not, the Yankees have been playing that role for the lion share of their existence and in recent years become the financial juggernaut other couldn't hope to be.

True, the Yankees haven't won a World Series in a few years, but they've made the play-offs every blessed year (this past season being the rare exception) making the World Series many of those times. While their collection of talent haven't brought home the big trophy recently, they have robbed other teams of their key players which made them more competitive. This makes it far less "New York Yankees" and more of "MLB All-Star Team". They routinely give away prospects out of their farm system and raid everyone else's talent pool instead. The results have largely been for oyher teams to either attempt to spend on par with the Yankees, or risk being the perpetual doormats. Even in an odd year when a team with a minuscule budget manages to put together a good team, it's a safe bet their rosters will be quickly vultured the moment teams with larger cash flows can. Even if their acquisitions do not better their team's overall performance, one can all but guarantee that a few key players gone, and the smaller team is right back in square one again trying to develop not just individual players but another team chemistry. It is a vicious cycle that many GM's and coaches simply cannot work with, and one in which fans of many teams are becoming fed up with.

A while back I proposed that if MLB wasn't going to adopt a salary cap and instead kept the all but meaningless "luxury tax", that they might be better off adopting a tier system of leagues similar to English soccer. This way teams with smaller budgets and revenue could actually have a chance to become somewhat successful, and fans of those teams could have some security knowing their team wasn't having just an almost meaningless 162-game warm-up for the same teams. Perhaps it isn't the best idea, but at the next thought it would seem far better than simply watch a few teams (led largely by New York) dismantle half the competitions best players, Doing that robs not just a team of wins on the field or marketing off of it, but also it robs all of baseball a little more competition and shared excitement.

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I think some of you guys are missing the point. The only thing you're seeing is that a team is spending an ungodly amount of money, gobbling up many of baseball's All-Stars and because they seem to do so without a clearly defined strategy and therefore falling short of expectations, you feel that means there is no problem. I disagree. In the proper hands (and minds) this limitless spending frenzy could make a constant contender, and arguably- trophies or not, the Yankees have been playing that role for the lion share of their existence and in recent years become the financial juggernaut other couldn't hope to be.

True, the Yankees haven't won a World Series in a few years, but they've made the play-offs every blessed year (this past season being the rare exception) making the World Series many of those times. While their collection of talent haven't brought home the big trophy recently, they have robbed other teams of their key players which made them more competitive. This makes it far less "New York Yankees" and more of "MLB All-Star Team". They routinely give away prospects out of their farm system and raid everyone else's talent pool instead. The results have largely been for oyher teams to either attempt to spend on par with the Yankees, or risk being the perpetual doormats. Even in an odd year when a team with a minuscule budget manages to put together a good team, it's a safe bet their rosters will be quickly vultured the moment teams with larger cash flows can. Even if their acquisitions do not better their team's overall performance, one can all but guarantee that a few key players gone, and the smaller team is right back in square one again trying to develop not just individual players but another team chemistry. It is a vicious cycle that many GM's and coaches simply cannot work with, and one in which fans of many teams are becoming fed up with.

A while back I proposed that if MLB wasn't going to adopt a salary cap and instead kept the all but meaningless "luxury tax", that they might be better off adopting a tier system of leagues similar to English soccer. This way teams with smaller budgets and revenue could actually have a chance to become somewhat successful, and fans of those teams could have some security knowing their team wasn't having just an almost meaningless 162-game warm-up for the same teams. Perhaps it isn't the best idea, but at the next thought it would seem far better than simply watch a few teams (led largely by New York) dismantle half the competitions best players, Doing that robs not just a team of wins on the field or marketing off of it, but also it robs all of baseball a little more competition and shared excitement.

Ooh, I like that.

Tier 1:

Yankees and Red Sox (since we all know that they're soooooooooooooooo much better than everyone else, right espn?)

Tier 2:

everyone else :P

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I think some of you guys are missing the point. The only thing you're seeing is that a team is spending an ungodly amount of money, gobbling up many of baseball's All-Stars and because they seem to do so without a clearly defined strategy and therefore falling short of expectations, you feel that means there is no problem. I disagree. In the proper hands (and minds) this limitless spending frenzy could make a constant contender, and arguably- trophies or not, the Yankees have been playing that role for the lion share of their existence and in recent years become the financial juggernaut other couldn't hope to be.

True, the Yankees haven't won a World Series in a few years, but they've made the play-offs every blessed year (this past season being the rare exception) making the World Series many of those times. While their collection of talent haven't brought home the big trophy recently, they have robbed other teams of their key players which made them more competitive. This makes it far less "New York Yankees" and more of "MLB All-Star Team". They routinely give away prospects out of their farm system and raid everyone else's talent pool instead. The results have largely been for oyher teams to either attempt to spend on par with the Yankees, or risk being the perpetual doormats. Even in an odd year when a team with a minuscule budget manages to put together a good team, it's a safe bet their rosters will be quickly vultured the moment teams with larger cash flows can. Even if their acquisitions do not better their team's overall performance, one can all but guarantee that a few key players gone, and the smaller team is right back in square one again trying to develop not just individual players but another team chemistry. It is a vicious cycle that many GM's and coaches simply cannot work with, and one in which fans of many teams are becoming fed up with.

A while back I proposed that if MLB wasn't going to adopt a salary cap and instead kept the all but meaningless "luxury tax", that they might be better off adopting a tier system of leagues similar to English soccer. This way teams with smaller budgets and revenue could actually have a chance to become somewhat successful, and fans of those teams could have some security knowing their team wasn't having just an almost meaningless 162-game warm-up for the same teams. Perhaps it isn't the best idea, but at the next thought it would seem far better than simply watch a few teams (led largely by New York) dismantle half the competitions best players, Doing that robs not just a team of wins on the field or marketing off of it, but also it robs all of baseball a little more competition and shared excitement.

Ooh, I like that.

Tier 1:

Yankees and Red Sox (since we all know that they're soooooooooooooooo much better than everyone else, right espn?)

Tier 2:

everyone else :P

I could live with that.

Oh, and just for the hell of it...

Team chemistry. ;)

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Since when is team chemistry not a part of baseball? Let's hear some examples of how team chemistry does not exist in baseball. Do you have any for team chemistry? None for team chemistry? I think it does exist.

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Yeah, it's fair. But without money the Yankees would be the AL's Nationals. They have no farm system as far as I am aware of. They have to spend to compete. But look at the Twins, and now Rays. They can compete with no money because they have beastly farm systems. The Yankees got money to buy great players, but I see no team chemistry. (Pohlad, holla)

The Yankees actually have a very good farm system, which is impressive because as recently as four or five years ago their farm system was completely depleted.

Yeah, I guess they do. I just didn't realize it because it's never talked about (ESPN). It would be nice for them to bring up a couple guys and get them in there with the vets to create some team chemistry.

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Since when is team chemistry not a part of baseball? Let's hear some examples of how team chemistry does not exist in baseball. Do you have any for team chemistry? None for team chemistry? I think it does exist.

Yeah, I really hate Texiera, so I'll intentionally put him in a bad spot...

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