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Tampa Bay Wearing Throwbacks


Luigi

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I'm watching the Tampa Bay vs. Atlanta game right now and it looks as if the numbers on Tampa Bays Unis are screen-printed on. They're shinier than Atlanta's and I swear i could see the mesh of Josh Freeman's jersey through his number. Any info on if these numbers ae screen-printed is appreciated. Also, if they are screen-printed, is this because they are trying to acheive a 'true throwback' look? Or for any other reason?

EDIT: Alright, I can confirm that Josh Freeman's numbers are printed, as well as his NOB. It also seems that his jersey is completely made of mesh.

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yea. i posted in the nfl weekly notes section, earlier.

i love how they used mesh all the way around the jersey, and printed the numbers on. looked really cool.

i actually loved those uniforms. only bad thing was the white clips for the face shields...they looked like cotton balls on their facemask.

and i LOVE that they lost!! AHAHAH!! RISE UP FALCONS!

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Actually, the numbers are probably heat pressed rather than screen printed.

could you explain the difference?

It's exactly as the names suggest.

Heat-pressed numbers are cut out of a thin material (vinyl?) and affixed to the jersey by a heat press. Think giant waffle machine, which presses the number against the material and melts the back layer, causing it to stick. These numbers can and do fall off from time to time - happened to the Knicks' Amar'e Stoudemire just a few weeks ago:

http://hardcourtmayhem.com/blog/2010/11/25/amare-stoudemire-loses-his-number-off-jersey-in-game/

Screen-printed numbers are painted on, in the silkscreen process. There's no physical number at all, just paint.

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Actually, the numbers are probably heat pressed rather than screen printed.

could you explain the difference?

Simple way to explain it, think of heat press as an iron-on transfer, albeit a more professional version. Where as screen printed, would be each number is blocked out on a screen and the ink is pressed through the screen for one color, then after it dries and the second color is pressed through another screen to give you the outline.

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Actually, the numbers are probably heat pressed rather than screen printed.

could you explain the difference?

It's exactly as the names suggest.

Heat-pressed numbers are cut out of a thin material (vinyl?) and affixed to the jersey by a heat press. Think giant waffle machine, which presses the number against the material and melts the back layer, causing it to stick. These numbers can and do fall off from time to time - happened to the Knicks' Amar'e Stoudemire just a few weeks ago:

http://hardcourtmayhem.com/blog/2010/11/25/amare-stoudemire-loses-his-number-off-jersey-in-game/

Screen-printed numbers are painted on, in the silkscreen process. There's no physical number at all, just paint.

Thanks for that explanation, i thought it was something like that but if the numbers were heat-pressed and not screen-printed, wouldn't the mesh still be covered? or does the material 'sink' into the mesh. Another question, was this how numbers were applied in the 70s, 80s and early 90s?

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This is what sort of bothers me here. It's one thing for "authenticity" but aren't all teams using the modern twill numbers on their throwbacks? The price really doesn't reflect it that much. I paid almost as much for my throwback as I did for my home/away and they are twill, three color numbers, have the sleeve logos sewn, and have a two color sewn wordmark on them.

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This is what sort of bothers me here. It's one thing for "authenticity" but aren't all teams using the modern twill numbers on their throwbacks? The price really doesn't reflect it that much. I paid almost as much for my throwback as I did for my home/away and they are twill, three color numbers, have the sleeve logos sewn, and have a two color sewn wordmark on them.

I don't know how true this is, but from what I was told by a few people I know down in Tampa, the Buc team shop actually caught a lil' bit of flak for trying to sell a "too authentic" authentic last season when they revived these things. The crux of the ill will was the numbers--some folks couldn't justify paying two hundred-something dollars for "a replica". Gut guess is if this was the case, somebody got hip to that and afterward they started offering the throwbacks with actual twill numbers this go-round.

(Which, even though I already own plenty of creamsicle gear, I still dropped change on...couldn't help it. B) )

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This is what sort of bothers me here. It's one thing for "authenticity" but aren't all teams using the modern twill numbers on their throwbacks?

I can't speak for Tampa Bay, but most of the teams wearing throwbacks are referencing jerseys that originally had sewn-on numbers. Screen print in the pros was a relatively short-lived "innovation."

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This is what sort of bothers me here. It's one thing for "authenticity" but aren't all teams using the modern twill numbers on their throwbacks?

I can't speak for Tampa Bay, but most of the teams wearing throwbacks are referencing jerseys that originally had sewn-on numbers. Screen print in the pros was a relatively short-lived "innovation."

If by 'short-lived' you mean 20 years or so, then I guess screen printing was short-lived in the pros. Let's not confuse paint with ink, either. Similar in some ways, but definitely not the same.

Depending on how heavy the ink is applied, sometimes it will totally block out the holes in the mesh. Michigan had really heavy printed numbers on its jerseys before switching back to tackle twill.

Heat transferred numbers could sink into the mesh a little bit, but they wont blow all the way through so you can see the holes. Football jerseys are never are made with heat transferred numbers anyway. They're just not durable enough. There are also different types of heat applied numbers and letters. Some processes leave you with a more permanent number than others.

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If by 'short-lived' you mean 20 years or so, then I guess screen printing was short-lived in the pros.

Considering that football jerseys have had identifiers sewn on to them for about a hundred years (at least), then yes. I'd consider 20 years or so to be relatively short-lived.

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This is what sort of bothers me here. It's one thing for "authenticity" but aren't all teams using the modern twill numbers on their throwbacks? The price really doesn't reflect it that much. I paid almost as much for my throwback as I did for my home/away and they are twill, three color numbers, have the sleeve logos sewn, and have a two color sewn wordmark on them.

I don't know how true this is, but from what I was told by a few people I know down in Tampa, the Buc team shop actually caught a lil' bit of flak for trying to sell a "too authentic" authentic last season when they revived these things. The crux of the ill will was the numbers--some folks couldn't justify paying two hundred-something dollars for "a replica". Gut guess is if this was the case, somebody got hip to that and afterward they started offering the throwbacks with actual twill numbers this go-round.

(Which, even though I already own plenty of creamsicle gear, I still dropped change on...couldn't help it. B) )

Just got my creamcicle in the mail today. It pains me to say this, but I'm a little disappointed. From my previous post, you can see price-wise why I'm disappointed. The jersey itself is completely mesh except for the side panels and Buc, they used twill numbers and letters on the name plate. It looks like a $40 jersey with $70 worth of twill on it...putting this Talib (hope he gets healthy and gets his behavior straight) by the home and away one sort of makes me wish I got the throwback first so I could be blown away by the other two.

Prices: Throwback $281, but used a coupon and got it for $253

Red: $284

White: $142 (using the buy one, get one half off coupon)

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This is what sort of bothers me here. It's one thing for "authenticity" but aren't all teams using the modern twill numbers on their throwbacks? The price really doesn't reflect it that much. I paid almost as much for my throwback as I did for my home/away and they are twill, three color numbers, have the sleeve logos sewn, and have a two color sewn wordmark on them.

I don't know how true this is, but from what I was told by a few people I know down in Tampa, the Buc team shop actually caught a lil' bit of flak for trying to sell a "too authentic" authentic last season when they revived these things. The crux of the ill will was the numbers--some folks couldn't justify paying two hundred-something dollars for "a replica". Gut guess is if this was the case, somebody got hip to that and afterward they started offering the throwbacks with actual twill numbers this go-round.

(Which, even though I already own plenty of creamsicle gear, I still dropped change on...couldn't help it. B) )

Just got my creamcicle in the mail today. It pains me to say this, but I'm a little disappointed. From my previous post, you can see price-wise why I'm disappointed. The jersey itself is completely mesh except for the side panels and Buc, they used twill numbers and letters on the name plate. It looks like a $40 jersey with $70 worth of twill on it...putting this Talib (hope he gets healthy and gets his behavior straight) by the home and away one sort of makes me wish I got the throwback first so I could be blown away by the other two.

Prices: Throwback $281, but used a coupon and got it for $253

Red: $284

White: $142 (using the buy one, get one half off coupon)

Can you post pics of the throwback?

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